GUN Store owner found not guilty in death of robber

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by TL1000RSquid, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. TL1000RSquid

    TL1000RSquid ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    So how does Fl work can the shitbags family try to sue him since he had been charged for the death?

    Storer: NOT GUILTY

    Tampa, Florida - A Jury in Hillsborough County Circuit Court has found Lawrence Storer not guilty.

    Storer was on trial for manslaughter in the 2003 death of 24-year-old Shantavious Wilson.

    Storer was rennovating his restaurant at 11:30PM, when Wilson robbed Storer at gunpoint, and Storer ran down Wilson in his Ford Explorer SUV, killing Wilson.

    Storer is the owner of Sumos Thai restaurant on Twiggs St., just a couple of blocks from the courthouse where he was acquitted.

    Jury deliberates fate in restaurant owner's manslaughter trial
    By: Sara Dorsey

    Tampa, Florida -- Jurors are now decided victim or vigilante in the the trial of a restaurant owner charged with killing a robber..

    A restaurant owner charged with killing a robber took the stand in his own defense today.

    Lawrence Storer is on trial for manslaughter, after he chased and ran over his armed attacker, Shantavious Wilson.

    Storer's entire defense rests on his shoulders now. A blow to his case came this morning when his lawyers tried to introduce a witness who was also robbed by Wilson in 1998, but the judge ruled the woman could not testify, due to legal reasons.

    Now Storer's own words could make or break him.

    When asked if he knew Wilson’s weapon was only a pellet gun, Storer replied, “It looked real to me.”

    It was this pellet gun and robbery that the defense contends caused an emotional Lawrence Storer, who believed the police were on the way, to get in his truck and chase after his armed attacker.

    “I accelerated as he started to run,” Storer said on the stand. “We both went down Polk Street together, and then my vehicle struck him.”

    Storer says he was hysterical when he leaned over a dying Wilson for one last exchange, which was caught in surveillance video.

    “You've been caught, and you're not getting away with this,” Storer says he told Wilson.

    The defense has rested on its questioning of Storer. Prosecutors tried to chip away at his testimony in cross-examination.

    If he's convicted, Storer could face up to 15 years in prison.
     
  2. Aequitas

    Aequitas If it keeps on raining, levee's going to break.

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    He might can be sued since it happened before the law was passed.:dunno:
     
  3. TL1000RSquid

    TL1000RSquid ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    New article about it.
    www.sptimes.com/2006/08/03/Hillsborough/_Excusable_homicide__.shtml

    'Excusable homicide' makes a free man
    “I didn’t think I was going to walk from this,” said Lawrence Storer, acquitted of manslaughter.


    CARRIE WEIMAR, EMILY NIPPS and ALDO NAHED
    Published August 3, 2006

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    TAMPA — Cheers and homemade banners greeted Lawrence Storer as he returned to his restaurant a free man Thursday afternoon.

    “Each moment is becoming more real,” said Storer, 36 , as a stream of friends and customers stopped by his Sumos Thai Cafe, 301 E Twiggs St., to offer congratulations.

    The impromptu celebration broke out just minutes after a jury found Storer not guilty of manslaughter in the death of 24-year-old Shantavious Wilson.“I am free,” Storer said, as passers-by pumped their fists or honked. “I don’t have to live under a microscope anymore.”


    Meanwhile, Wilson’s father, Augustus, returned to his Tampa home and popped several Aleve tablets. The constant headache he has suffered since his son’s death in 2003 was pounding.


    His son may have robbed Storer, but he didn’t deserve to die, Wilson said.


    “He took my son,” Wilson, 46, said of Storer. “It wasn’t my son’s time. He got a judge. He got a jury. My son didn’t get any of that.”



    In the end, a provision of Florida law that permits homicide under extreme circumstances spared Storer from a guilty verdict and a potential 15-year prison sentence.


    Florida law says homicide is excusable when it occurs by “accident or misfortune in the heat of passion, upon any sudden or sufficient provocation.”


    Storer’s lawyer, John Fitzgibbons, said his client’s situation perfectly matched the definition of excusable homicide.


    “The main thing we wanted to demonstrate to the jury is that this is an ordinary, hardworking citizen who was confronted with a sudden, horrific situation and acted out of character,” Fitzgibbons said from his law office Thursday afternoon.


    Juror Andrew Thornton, who works in patient transport for Tampa General Hospital, said he found Fitzgibbons’ argument convincing.


    “We felt the homicide was excusable,” Thornton said. “Not justifiable, excusable. We believe he meant to hit him.

    We believe he did not mean to kill him. We figured at 20 miles per hour, he probably figured he’d knock him to the ground, but didn’t think it would be enough impact to kill him.”


    The panel of four men and two women deliberated for almost five hours over two days before returning the not-guilty verdict. Thornton said there was never much doubt they would reach a unanimous decision.


    “One person was glad we waited until the next day,” he said. “We were kind of there (Wednesday) night. But he had some doubts that were laid to rest when we went through all the evidence and looked at everything carefully again.”


    By Thursday morning, the jury was 100 percent certain they had reached the correct verdict, Thornton said.
    Storer said he didn’t know what to expect as Circuit Judge Barbara Fleischer summoned everyone back to the courtroom at 10:50 a.m.


    “The prosecution had a valuable argument to make,” he said. “I didn’t think I was going to walk from this.”
    Storer showed no emotion as the clerk read the not-guilty verdict. But his tears began to flow as he sat down next to his lawyer. Fitzgibbons leaned over and patted him on the back.


    “You’re free to go,” Fleischer told Storer as the jurors left the courtroom.


    Assistant State Attorney Jalal Harb said he was disappointed but not completely surprised by the verdict.


    “I respect what the jurors did,” Harb said. “I think they gave it their best shot.”


    Storer was sitting in his Ford Explorer outside his downtown restaurant on the night of Oct. 29, 2003, when Wilson thrust a gun at him and demanded money.


    The big, silver gun later turned out to be a pellet gun.


    Storer said he was scared Wilson was going to kill him and pleaded for his life. Wilson ran off with $15.23 in change from the restaurant as Storer dialed 911.


    Then Storer climbed back into his Explorer and chased Wilson. The pursuit ended on Polk Street. A surveillance tape showed Storer leaning over Wilson’s lifeless body, pointing a finger at him.


    Fitzgibbons said his office has been besieged with calls from people offering their support for Storer.


    “I think a lot of people are fed up with crime,” Fitzgibbons said.


    But Hillsborough County State Attorney Mark Ober said he was obligated to follow through on the charges.


    “It was a case that needed to be tried,” Ober said. “The message that it sent is the law places a high value on human life, and citizens need to be ever so cautious before they take a life.”


    Florida is one of a handful of states with an excusable homicide provision, said Robert Batey, who has taught criminal law at Stetson University College of Law since 1977.


    Excusable homicide is different from justifiable homicide, Batey said. For example, if Storer had shot Wilson during the robbery, it could be called justifiable, he said.


    “Even the defendant wasn’t arguing that he was justified in doing this,” Batey said. “In this case, you’re saying you’re sorry you did it, but you have some extenuating circumstances.”


    The jury’s verdict should not be interpreted to mean robbery victims can take the law into their own hands, Batey added.


    “All they’re saying is, we’re sorry he did it but we don’t think he should be punished to the fullest extent of the law,” he said.


    Storer said he’s eager to get on with life with his wife, 13-year-old stepson and 3-year-old daughter. His restaurant will be open for lunch today.


    As for Augustus Wilson, he’ll put away his son’s prized Michael Jordan baseball card and try to move on.


    “It’s not the verdict I wanted,” Wilson said. “But there’s really nothing I can do about that.”

    Blah blah he was such a good boy :rolleyes:
    Then why the fuck is he sticking a gun in someones face? Its not Stoer's fault he's dead its the parents fault for raising worthless dirtbag kid.
     
  4. Artyboy

    Artyboy Necessity is the excuse for every infringement of

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    :werd: The kid is a direct reflection on the parents. Of course the parents are going to defend their kid's character to their last breath.
     
  5. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

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    maybe the guy who killed the shit bag should sue the father for not parenting proper and forcing him unnecessary emotional trama for having to kill him :mamoru:
     
  6. TL1000RSquid

    TL1000RSquid ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    And for damages to his vehicle.
     
  7. Sssnake

    Sssnake meh

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    The real message that was sent was to the DA and the courts saying that the people are tired of criminals being victims.
     
  8. Gimik

    Gimik New Member

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    I LOVE that message.
     
  9. Artyboy

    Artyboy Necessity is the excuse for every infringement of

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    :bigthumb:
     
  10. BigBadJohn

    BigBadJohn Pay-back time OT Supporter

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    .


    I think the American court systems are retarded, where you can sue anyone for anything, and where criminals are called victims.
     

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