stationary bike rpm to mph?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Leo95SE, Mar 9, 2006.

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  1. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    is there a consistent calculation that can be used?
    the only numbers ive seen are 55rpm = 15mph.
     
  2. blam

    blam New Member

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    you would need the radius of the tire.
     
  3. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    arent they standard for stationary bikes?
     
  4. blam

    blam New Member

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    Maybe, but who the fuck knows that kind of shit?
     
  5. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    not up to bringing a tape into a gym and measuring while someone is staring down at me.. lol

    id just assume they were all the same.

    someone go ride a stationary bike and tell me what it says :big grin:
     
  6. Vailripper

    Vailripper Daywalkers have feelings too.

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    The bikes at my gym show both? :dunno:
     
  7. blam

    blam New Member

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    Figure out what type it is and look on the manufacturers webpage. They should list it under specs.
     
  8. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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  9. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    4' tire!

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    went there. precor - nuttin .

    bah.
     
  11. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    btw, correct formula?

    circumference = pi*d
    4' tire (!!!) = 150" circumference

    tire travels (you move) 150" in one rev. (12.5ft)
    so, 80rpm * 12.5' = 1000ft/min, or 11.3mph
     
  12. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    sorry most ppl dont measure circumference, but diameter. i just misread.

    however, i dont think you calc'd right, did you?

    4' cir = 3.6mph from my retard calcs.
     
  13. houseofdon

    houseofdon Simplify Moderator

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    Well, it would depend on what resistance you have it on. Since those levels effectively serve as gears do on a normal bike, speed will be related to more than just RPM.

    I think it's way more effort to figure this out than what it's worth.
     
  14. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    resistance is changed by the tightening of the belt around the wheel. why would that play a factor in distance travelled? wouldnt that be work performed?
    tighter belt(gearing) means more work, or slower rpm, but still same conversion of rpm to mph, whether slow or fast..
     
  15. houseofdon

    houseofdon Simplify Moderator

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    Do whatever the fuck you guys want, I'm just telling you that every single bike I've been on will factor in your resistance level when calculating the speed.
     
  16. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    another approach is considering resistance level, and using an arbitrary formula to calculate rpm/speed based on some predetermined ratio.

    ill get to the bottom of this..
     
  17. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    i did that. data not avail. ill contact manufacturers when i have some free time.
     
  18. ACURA TL-S

    ACURA TL-S OT Supporter

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    Well if you think about it, you can do 100 peddle rpms and only go 5mph on a bike in first gear, or you can do 100 peddle rpms in 27th gear (or whatever the fuck bikes go up to these days) and be doing 35 mph. The difference is going to be the resistance of the peddle to the force generated by your feet. And although there is no real way to recreate this on a stationary (mainly because you can't freewheel like you can on a road bike) it would be more appropriate if you considered your speed as increasing as your resistance increased (assuming the same peddle rpms).
     
  19. houseofdon

    houseofdon Simplify Moderator

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    Thx. My point exactly.
     
  20. houseofdon

    houseofdon Simplify Moderator

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    And furthering my argument that you are going to drive yourself insane trying to figure this out.
     
  21. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    this is a good point, power would have to increase if resistance increased to maintain rpm. (common sense, huh?)

    i was hoping to avoid the calculated gearing on the bike but i dont think you can. not for the direct reason that seems obvious, but b/c i think the display generates some calculated rpm/mph based on a programmed resistance, or assumed wheel diameter. since you essentially arent really moving, it has to make up one of these variables, i think.

    'real' bike gearing is like 1:1, 1:2, etc. im guessing stationary bikes have to assume one of these ratios for the formula to work, AND, since you have to input weight (and if you change it, notice the other variable change as well), this also plays some odd factor in the calc.

    either way, all guesswork at this point. ill see if any of the manufacturers can provide me with some good info. :)
     
  22. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    fine with me, i enjoy it. it was obviously created an entered into some sort of plc or microchip so that means theres an answer. im sure the answer will have no bearing at all though, it will be completely arbitrary, and the time/distance spent on a stationary bike will wind up not related at all to real ones. (im not talking wind resistance, terrain, etc either)
     
  23. SantorinA4

    SantorinA4 New Member

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    The bikes at my gym show both and when I go 90 rpm it says it is around 11 mph.
     
  24. gkb

    gkb im confused

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    I'm a bit of a biker, and while I've never been on a stationary at a gym. I've been riding my bike on my trainer a lot over this winter. Really your rpm is not very translatable at all to what your speed is gonna be out on the streets.

    Your best bet is just finding the highest resistance which you can hold about 90+rpm. You'll see your speed/endurance on the streets increasing a lot, especially if your new.
     
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