Static IP and Wireless router

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Slid., Apr 3, 2004.

  1. Slid.

    Slid. I'm a guy.

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    I have a linksys wireless-b router. I know that the default settings are for DHCP but if I turned DHCP off does that mean I can use static IP addressing with it? I would only assume so since you either have DHCP or static but I just want to make sure.

    I have a DHCP connection at home so I can't really test it out.

    Thanks.
     
  2. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Which side of the router are you asking? For the LAN side, yes you can use DHCP or Static - it's up to each computer setting to decide if the IP should be static or assigned by the DHCP server. If you are asking on the WAN side, that all depends on the service you have with your ISP. Most ISP's plans change their IP addresses on a regular basis unless you purchase a Static IP from them. In the case where they don't provide you with a static IP, you'd have a hard time setting the router's WAN IP to the correct IP address and if it were to change and not be valid with the ISP, you'd end up losing your connection.
     
  3. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    On the LAN side, you're free to use both static and dynamic addressing. Say your router is 192.168.0.1. It might be configured to act as a DHCP server and hand out addresses between 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.50. Everything from 192.168.0.51 to 192.168.0.254 is yours to assign manually.
     
  4. Slid.

    Slid. I'm a guy.

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    Okay - that partially gets me where I want to be. I am actually looking for the WAN side of things. What I am doing is buying cable or DSL service with 4-5 STATIC IPs. So with a wired hookup I just manually assign IP, gateway, subnet and DNS to each computer - now with a wireless setup I'd be able to do the same thing?

    Lets assume that my ISP gives me the IPs 172.64.155.105-108 - I can turn DHCP OFF on my wireless router and it will -route- my requests for static IPs to my ISPs server?

    This is in a business situation - the reason why I'm not just using DHCP.

    Thanks, I appreciate the help.
     
  5. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Let's start from the beginning - do you have a good reason to have that many public IP addresses? There's no need for them unless you are serving, and even then you can be selective on what you allow through. If they're desktop computers that need access to the internet, I would NOT give them a public IP.

    Now, to use the router as you have suggested, you can use it as a wireless access point, however, when you connect the router to the DSL modem, do NOT use the WAN port in your case. Simply hook up a cable from one your other ports to the modem.

    Having said all of that, I would seriously let us know what youa re trying to accomplish with each computer and its role. My gut feeling is that you have too many static IP's.
     
  6. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    WAN side: Assign it one of the IP addresses from the block your ISP allocated you.

    LAN side: Let your router act as a DHCP server with NAT enabled for your computers.
     
  7. Slid.

    Slid. I'm a guy.

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    UGH - made a big post but was owned by an Expired Page.

    Anyways - I need static IPs for my 4-5 machines because of a retail program that we run. If we attempt to use DHCP then only one machine is capable of logging in and that is no good.

    I need static IPs on my LAN side, any way I can get it. Right now in most of our stores our DSL modems come with a 4 port hub built in so we just plug into that. We have a new setup coming in this week that has only one port so we need a router OR a hub.

    What is my best bet to go with if I want to pull 4-5 static IPs from a single-port cable modem? I would think that I could setup a router to connect through the modem using DHCP then turn DHCP off on the router and configure the computers for static IP addressing.

    I understand that there are risks with static IPs but in order to use DHCP we need to open up a new port in our server and we aren't all that comfortable with that.

    Thanks fellas!
     
  8. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    You need a router that can disable NAT on the LAN side. Its on by default and it doesn't matter whether you assign 192.168.x.x addresses manually or let the DHCP server do it, they're still NATed. I'm no sure if the $50 routers (ie Linksys, Netgear, D-link, etc) will let you turn off NAT and pass public IP addresses through to LAN. You might need to get a more expensive one than has more flexible firmware.
     
  9. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    Ok. I read it again. You should be able to connect the cable modem to a hub/switch, then connect a wireless access point to another port on the hub/switch. The access point is basically a wired to wireless bridge (OSI layer 2) so it doesn't matter to the cable modem that they're wireless instead of connected directly to it via Cat5. Assuming the cable company has assigned your 5 static public IP addresses, you can just assign one to each PC.
     
  10. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    You don't need to buy anything other than a switch or a hub for what you are doing then. The modem itself is a router of sorts, on one side the ISP, on the other, your public IPs. Simply plug everything into the hub/switch and you're set (although you may have to use the uplink toggle button on the last port to join the hub with the modem). Here's how I would do it:

    Desktop Computers and laptops not requiring Public IP's
    |
    | (Router LAN Ports)
    V
    Router
    |
    | Router WAN port
    V
    Hub <-------- Computers requiring Public IP's
    |
    | Uplink port (possibly - depends on the modem)
    V
    Modem

    The computers connected to the router would be set to DHCP, the router would hand out DHCP addresses, but would have static WAN IP (one of the IP's you are provided). The Public IP computers would also have to be static.

    If you need your wireless PC's to have a public IP (which I totally do not recommend), then you need to connect the router to the hub via one of the regular LAN ports, and assign Public IP's to each of the wireless PC's
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2004
  11. Slid.

    Slid. I'm a guy.

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    Awesome thanks guys. I was just trying to do a mock setup using a dsl/cable router before we went live with it but I'll go straight at it with a hub. I don't need the wireless connection so I can just slap a hub down and plug into that - it is pretty clear to me now.

    Thanks again.
     

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