Starting hi-fi setup for around 2.5K AUD

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Wudan, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. Wudan

    Wudan Insert Avatar picture here:

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    Looking at getting into some quality budget hi-fi gear for a stereo setup.
    I've got a budget of about $2000 stretching to $2500 depending on the gains. I want to start this system as a decent stereo setup with the aim of expanding into surround sound latter as money presents.

    For the mains/fronts, I'm interested in some big sound and looking at floorstanders, with a budget of about $1000-$1500.

    My choices are either looking at kits, or prebuilt speakers. I've been looking at kit speakers from LSK [www.theloudspeakerkit.com] and Vaf [www.vaf.com.au]. Both the F6 mkII and TL6 from LSK are in the right price range ($1199). Is there a reason why the prices are the same for these two designs? I would have expected their flagship range to be more expensive than the deluxe. Is there any reason why the F6's would be preferable to the TL6?

    The TL6 seem to have a greater frequency response (30 compared with 37 for F6's) but a lower sensitivity (89.5db compared to 90db for F6's).

    From Vaf, I can really only afford the DC-7 G4 speakers. As a kit, these are $1399, which is $200 more than the speakers from LSK. I can't find any specs on these speakers from the website (might not be looking hard enough), but are they worth the extra investment over the kits from LSK?

    Prebuilt speakers, there seems to be a few around my price range, but how do they compare to kit speakers? I have no problems getting my hand dirty to make the speakers, but if the gain is small, then it might be more worth my while to get prebuilt speakers. Would a set of prebuilt speakers at the ~$1200 mark sound much different from kit speakers of the same cost?

    How do floorstanding speakers from Jamo, KEF, B&W, Mission and Wharfedale in the $1200 range compare?

    Now for amps, I'm not entirely sure where to go. I've been looking at ranges from Cambridge Audio (540A v2 and 640A v2), NAD (C352, C372 or C320/325BEE).

    Both the 540A and the C320/325BEE are around the $600 mark and put out about 50W per channel. Would there be that much noticable difference going to the next range up at $900 for either the 640A or C352?

    My initial choices were to go for the C352 NAD amp with the LSK TL6 floorstanders, but should I get a cheaper amp, and spend more on the speakers? e.g. C320BEE NAD amp and the Vaf DC-7 G4's?

    Any input would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

  3. GammaRadiation

    GammaRadiation Active Member

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    That is about 2900 and change for us Americans.

    I love Dayton for budget awsomeness.
     
  4. Wudan

    Wudan Insert Avatar picture here:

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    Just found a deal on JBL Studio L890's for $1625 for the pair, down from a rrp of $2499. Think I might go try them out. Probably skimp a bit on the amp and get a NAD C352 or even NAD 325BEE.

    Any comments on JBL Studio L series?
     
  5. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    e-price: 1200 per pair

    that RRP is bull shit unless there are tariffs

    the sudio l series should be pretty decent for home theater use and and whatnot, probably not as defined in soundstaging etc as other manufacturers might be, but demo them, if you like them, get them, that price is probably good considering they had to ship them to australia

    1,625.00 AUD

    =

    1,368.42 USD

    thats actually a good deal it seems like
     
  6. Wudan

    Wudan Insert Avatar picture here:

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    That's what I thought. I knew there was a markup, everything in Australia has a serious markup, especially if it's not made here, because our market is so small. Not to mention the speakers weigh in at 60lbs each.

    I know the US rrp is about $799 each, so $1600 for the pair with and exchange rate of 0.841, that's about $1900 AUD.

    In USD, that's about $685 each speaker.
     
  7. TFunkadelic

    TFunkadelic One Nation Under A Groove

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    There are advantages and disadvantages with both prebuilt and kit/completely DIY speakers.

    A typical rule of thumb is that prebuilt, or store bought speakers are priced at around 3-4 times the cost of the parts, so on paper, a $1,000 speaker that you built yourself should compare well with $3-4,000 speakers.

    The major problem here is that you can not (in most cases) invest as much money in research and development as a large speaker company. When you build a pair of speakers, if you design them yourself it is unlikely that they will sound their best on the first try due to less than ideal crossover/box design and driver selection. Since you will have likely already invested many hours and a good chunk of money in the speakers, you're stuck with what you have (other than crossover adjustments), or you have to rebuild the entire project at your expense.

    Speaker kits attempt to reach a compromise between buying prebuilt speakers and complete DIY by offering a tested design and instructions, and often a pre-built, decent quality cabinet, albeit at a lower performance:cost ratio. They'll also include all the parts you need.

    The option that I took myself was the last I'll mention, which is building a speaker from scratch using pre-existing, and tested plans. In this way, you get maximum performance:cost ratio, while following tried and true specs. I chose to build a clone of the Proac Response 2.5 speaker (when originally sold, they went for about $4,500 a pair) and it ended up costing me a little under $1,000 total price, and they sound and look great. The biggest drawbacks with this method are having to build your own box from scratch, and tracking down all of the crossover components (not very difficult).

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    che guevara ftw, is that your room?

    is it super active with all of the concrete?

    my floor for my ht room is concrete with backed carpetting and i wish my floor was something else sometimes. i like regular floors that will help carry tactile response to the seating location, wood/floating etc.
     
  9. TFunkadelic

    TFunkadelic One Nation Under A Groove

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    Basement where they're currently in use. I've never had big problems with reflections in this basement since it's not very open (big chimney and furnace in the center of the room), I've got a bunch of those thick area rugs throughout the basement, and is otherwise filled with random shit. My listening position's also only about 7 feet away, which helps alleviate some of the problems.

    I tried to set up a home theatre in my cabins basement once, however, which is basically just one big open concrete room, and had enough problems that it wasn't really even nice to listen to.
     
  10. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    after i get a new stereo channel amp i think im gonna order an acoustic panel kit from real traps or somethin
     
  11. TFunkadelic

    TFunkadelic One Nation Under A Groove

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    Get the room treatments first, they'll give you a more noticeable improvement unless your current amps don't work.
     
  12. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    hm i might just do that then, i might ante up for a beaster kit
     
  13. TFunkadelic

    TFunkadelic One Nation Under A Groove

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    If you can build a basic wood frame (like a picture frame) you can build your own that will work better for much, much less than commercially marketed sound treatment solutions.

    Get a hold of some Owens Corning 703 insulation, throw it in the frame and cover it with the fabric of your choice and you're good to go.

    The premade treatments and kits are often marked up the same way as "audiophile" cables.
     
  14. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    are there any designs on the net i can go by? i really dont enjoy woodworking in the slightest
     
  15. TFunkadelic

    TFunkadelic One Nation Under A Groove

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  16. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    are all sound panels pretty much of the same idea?

    i want bass traps though for sure, so just 2 sealed sides and 2 perforated ones with the inside filled absorbative material?

    and for wall mount stuff for reflection points i just need to build frames and then throw the acoustic insulater over it and then put some fabric on for asthetics? that should be pretty easy then

    i can probably do corner traps, some bass traps and some big wall traps for reflection points
     
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  17. TFunkadelic

    TFunkadelic One Nation Under A Groove

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    There are two main types, absorption and diffusion. you already know what absorption panels do, and diffusion panels work by scattering the sound wave in to many, smaller and less harmful waves.

    Many of the best studios use a combination of both.

    I've heard of people doing the design you mention, you can also build cylinderical ones pretty easily http://www.teresaudio.com/haven/traps/traps.html
     

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