A&P Someone tell me about product photography

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Public Enemy Rated R, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. Public Enemy Rated R

    Public Enemy Rated R Sexobsessedpussylovinman OT Supporter

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    I would like to take the best pictures I can of the antique lamps, lighting fixtures and shades that I can. Also, I don't want to have to spend much time editing the pics before uploading them. One problem I'm having is the different colors of the room as well as the flash reflecting on the shiney brass and nickle finishes on some of the lamps. What kind of advice can you OT photography geniuses give me to get me heading in the right direction?
     
  2. Mr_Penut

    Mr_Penut Elitist Member OT Supporter

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    don't use flash, and use one type of light to minimize post processing. Look into building your own softbox or something, as this will allow you to take pics in a controlled environment for cheap. search this forum for more info
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    The best advice I can give is to hire me to take your pics.

    The second best advice is to get yourself a seamless or other neutral background. Place your product a few feet in front of the back ground. Do not...repeat DO NOT... aim a flash directly at the lamps.

    Using two softlights on either side of the product will give you much better results. However, if you don't want to buy softlights, here is a poor mans soft box solution.

    If you only have one flash it must be taken off the camera. Buy a sheet of white foamcore (4' x 8') and cut it in half. Place your now 4' x 4' sheets of white foamcore on either side of your lamp, but put one of them about 6' from the lamp and the other just outside the frame (in other words, about 2' from the lamp) Aim your strobe into the foamcore farthest away. This will "bounce" the light from the foamcore back onto the lamp. The other piece of foamcore (the one closest to the product) will reflect the bounced light onto the shadow side of the product. You will have to play with distance and flash power/camera aperture to get the light just right.

    If you want to shoot a pic of the lamp with a bulb in it lighting up the inside of the lamp, you need to go to plan B. Adjust your camera's white balance setting to about 2600K. Do the same setup as above but use regular high wattage bulbs to bounce the light. You'll need to use a longer exposure time and fine tune the white balance. You may also need to get a cheap dimmer to connect to the lamp to balance the light inside the lamp with that of the other lights.
     
  4. Public Enemy Rated R

    Public Enemy Rated R Sexobsessedpussylovinman OT Supporter

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    Wow, I have no idea what you are talking about. I'm a photography primitive. I generally point and shoot but my nikon digital cam does work in user defined settings. Is there a book or books you can recommend that will tell me the basics of camera settings and whatnot? I can pick up on things pretty fast if I have something to get me started in the right direction. I can whip up the light box no problem.
     
  5. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Why yes....yes there is.

    http://forums.offtopic.com/showthread.php?t=2292040

    However this site is far more inclusive.

    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech.htm
     
  6. Public Enemy Rated R

    Public Enemy Rated R Sexobsessedpussylovinman OT Supporter

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  7. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Buy the book "Light Science and Magic" and read every page. Almost all of that book is inadvertently about product photography, and it is very well written with good examples.
     

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