Sofa king awful dealership detail and how to fix it

Discussion in 'That'll Buff Right Out' started by Scottwax, Aug 13, 2009.

  1. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    I did the estimate on this '03 Cadillac CTS about 10 days ago. From 50 feet away at his complex, I knew it was his car (he told me it had swirls). He just bought the car and the dealership gave him a pretty good price due to the paint-they claimed that is how the car was traded in. If that is in fact true, it stuns me that any dealership would put a car this bad on the lot without even making an attempt to remove the swirls. The car had been repainted on all but the passenger side doors, roof had visible sanding marks under the paint. Obviously it isn't a car worth spending $1000+ making perfect because there are issues that will require repainting to correct. He said the main thing he wanted removed was the rotary swirls and if anything else came out in the process he'd be more than pleased.

    After washing with ONR and claying with Opti-Clay, I got a good look at how truly bad the paint was:

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    Whoever buffed this car out takes sucking at using a rotary to a new level.

    Got busy with Meguiars #105 and a yellow Meguiars polishing pad at 1000-1400 rpms, on the trunk, hood and C pillars, I had to step up to an American Buffing orange waffle cutting pad at 1000-1400 rpms, then back down to the first combo to remove the light buffer trails I was leaving with the cutting pad-buffer trails that were significantly fainter than what was original on the car and I am sure #105 is more aggressive than whatever was used on the car.

    This after shot is a pretty direct comparison to the last before shot, I had done the #105 orange/yellow passes and then #205 using a yellow Meguiars polishing pad at 1000-1500 rpms (finishing with light pressure at 1000 rpms).

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    These half 'n half shots are after the #105 orange then yellow pad steps:

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    Before:

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    After #105/205 steps

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    #105 only:

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    #105/205

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    I then took a 30 minute lunch and let the paint bake in upper 90s temperatures. Came back and got busy with 3M Ultrafina using a blue Ultrafina pad at 1000-1800-1000 rpms.

    All polishing steps, no wax.

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    I then washed the car with ONR to remove the dust and then waxed it with Clearkote's Carnauba Moose. Total time on the car was about 7 hours, nothing done on the inside except cleaning the glass. Obviously the paint isn't 100% perfect but short of a repaint it won't be. There are still a few light spider swirls remaining in a few areas (only visible at odd angles) that he said he could live with rather than pop for a few hundred $$$ more of polishing. Plus the car sits outside 24/7 and he works at a hospital (cardiac therapy) so the odds the car won't remain perfect long are pretty high. However, for the time spent and how bad it was to start, I was very pleased with how well it came out and my customer was absolutely thrilled. :)

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  2. GuiltySparc

    GuiltySparc OT Supporter

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    wow!

    Seeing swirls like that makes me a little nervous about trying machine polishing myself...Is it possible to fubar your paint that badly with something like a PC?
     
  3. themolsen

    themolsen New Member

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    holy cow...really nice transformation!
     
  4. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    With a PC, absolutely not. That kind of damage can really only be done with a rotary. If I had to bet money on it, I'd say that was probably done with a wool pad, too. Foam pads can burn like that too, I've done it on practice panels intentionally before (just to see how bad I could make it and still be able to repair it), but it takes more effort to cause that kind of damage with foam.

    Excellent work as always, Scott! I do have a question for you though, just from curiosity: what backing plate do you use with the ultrafina pad? I just have my W68 that works fine on the SB2.0 pads, but the 8" ultrafina really seems too big to just use that plate with. Works fine, but I think I'd have more control with something else....
     
  5. seismic

    seismic New Member

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    Nothing is better than your threads, Scottwax!
     
  6. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Not sure, it was the one that came with my Dewalt. I believe it is a 5.5" BP. I also have a larger one, but the UF pad seems to work fine with the smaller one.
     
  7. Run N. Gun

    Run N. Gun Active Member

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    That is amazing work, Scott!!! :bowdown::bowdown: This should be a solid commercial/testimony for 105/205. The results are startling and awe-inspiring. :eek3:


    I'm curious, did you intentionally "let the paint bake in upper 90s temperatures" for a detailing reason (pre-ultrafina), or just because it was lunch time?
     
  8. HattoriHanzo

    HattoriHanzo New Member

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    wow thats amazing, one more reason to pay a pro to wax my car. lol
     
  9. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Sometimes if you let the oils in the polishes flash (or "bake"), they will reveal defects that weren't fully removed (and were instead just hidden/filled).

    The old Meg's polishes (80 series) would flash quite a lot and show a ton of defects that came back, though I haven't noticed that 105/205 are nearly as bad thanks to the non-diminishing abrasives. You just have to get a feel for how long to buff before all the defects are removed as opposed to just recognizing when the abrasives are all gone.

    Obviously the alternative would be an IPA wipe-down, but why do that if you can skip a step? :bigthumb:
     
  10. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Cool... so you're operating under the same mentality I am -- "It works, so fuck it." :bigthumb:
     
  11. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Both. I'd been working on the car close to 5 hours straight and needed a break, plus the heat will bake out any oils that might be filling. IPA wipedowns aren't that good to do out in the full sun (streaking mostly) so I let the sun to the work.
     
  12. Run N. Gun

    Run N. Gun Active Member

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    Ahhh, that's a great idea. :h5: Never thought of it that way.
     

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