So who AutoXs?

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by ParticleMan, Nov 17, 2003.

  1. ParticleMan

    ParticleMan Guest

    It looks like fun, I am thinking of going very soon, I would like to become a better driver in those types of situations. Can someone tell me about it? I know a litle about classing, are AutoX events like show up and run, or do you have to make reservations? WOuld there be alot in the Housotn area?

    I have two cars, which would you recommend?

    1992 Nissan 240sx, LSD, sway bars, couple power mods, clutch etc.

    2000 MR2 Spyder, exhaust, lightweight flywheel

    I assume the MR2 because of it's weight and cornering abilities. I will be adding a front sway bar soon and some suspension bracing. I have been told that it could really eat up the AutoX with the right mods, but the 240 is very well balanced, 50/50, had an LSD and is very neutral handling.
     
  2. TheKrazyRaven

    TheKrazyRaven New Member

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    i'm gonna start in the spring w/ my 94' SHO
     
  3. ocular

    ocular Active Member

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    ibblaise
     
  4. ae86andkp61

    ae86andkp61 Guest

    Either car will work just fine. You could even try both and see which you prefer.

    Typically you show up to the event and go through a registration/tech inspection. Details will differ depending on exactly who is putting on the event, but almost every auto-x I have ever been to is split into two run groups, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. So you show up at the beginning of the day, fill out an entry form, your car is inspected for basic safety, and you determine which class you car fits into best...this is usually based on vehicle type and mods, and once again, varies from region to region. Somebody there will be able to help you figure it out, and some events have a "first timer beginner" class to let you get your feet wet in any type of car.

    Then you will typically be asked to help work while you are not driving. You could be out on the course, watching for cones that get knocked over, or you could be helping with the timing equipment, or you may be helping line the cars up while waiting for their next run.

    When it is your group's turn to run, there will probably be some sort of staging lanes...stay near your car, be ready to go, helmet on or close by, etc.

    One car at a time against the clock, a starter will release you and then go for it!

    The course can be confusing, but if you get there early, there is usually a time when competitors can walk the course to help get a mental picture of it...and the organizers may hand out course maps.

    Hope this helps! Have fun...:big grin:
     
  5. Pure Energy

    Pure Energy Guest

    Doesn't matter which car you pick, your learning curve is going to be so steep. The best thing to do is when you get to registration, tell them you're new and they will probably pair you up with someone that has experience. We do that all the time in my region and I novice instruct regularly. Just make sure the car is in good shape and all cleaned out inside and go have fun.
     

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