So those plastic brushes are a no-no?

Discussion in 'That'll Buff Right Out' started by Maverick, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    I keep hearing that those brushes they use in the quarter spray bay are a huge no-no. If they're such a no-no, then why would a dealership use the same kind of brush to wash their cars? I work at an Acura dealership in SoCal and we use a soft plastic bristle brush for washing all the new and used cars. I just noticed the past couple of days that the cars that just come off the truck look better than the ones that have been washed on the lot. It looks like there's millions of light scratches on the cars. Using a sponge would take too much time and would kill out backs. What would be a much better alternative? I've already had one customer remark about the "spider webbing". :hsd:
     
  2. Bigsnake

    Bigsnake OT Supporter

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    A sponge is also a no-no. There is no place for dirt particles to go and they're dragged across the surface.

    The only two alternatse I see is spending the money on boar's hair brushes and then using them properly. Or getting Wash Mitts and using them. As a dealership they can be gotten pretty cheap from AutoInt.com.
     
  3. Parabellum

    Parabellum Molon Labe!

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    you answered your own question. The next time I buy a new car I make sure to tell them not to clean it or take of any of the plastic covering on the paint
     
  4. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    Or just ask them to polish and wax the car before delivery. They're not very deep scratches, they're very very light scratches.
     
  5. GJBenn85

    GJBenn85 New Member

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    There are two scenarios if a customer asks a dealer to do this:

    1) The dealer will use a glaze and the swirls/scratches will reappear within a couple of months.

    2) The dealer will use a wool pad on a rotary, introducing the ever so common rotary marks because most dealers do not have experienced/qualified detailers.

    In most cases, it is best to just not let the dealer touch your paint.
     
  6. Buck-O

    Buck-O Guest


    :werd:
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  7. Parabellum

    Parabellum Molon Labe!

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    Why would I trust a dealer to do that. The majority of them will fuck it up even more.

    At best they'll use a wax with a lot of fillers in it to hide the scatches and swirls.

    I think Scottwax has been fixing cars from BMW dealership near him for years.
     
  8. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Why? Because the makeready manager is a complete idiot and you can tell him I said so. Only a complete moron would direct their employees to use a brush to clean a car. Kick him in the nuts for me. :mad:

    I don't even use the Meguiars body brushes and those suckers are super soft. Not worth the risk, especially since I have a black car.

    If the dealership actually cares about their customers they would insist the cars be washed correctly. My number one rule is to never let the dealer wash, wax, vacuum or in any way clean a car.
     

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