So my computer no longer has MSWord...

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Slowmo, Oct 1, 2004.

  1. Slowmo

    Slowmo New Member

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    I reformatted last month, but nothing got erased...just disabled. I got around to deleting all of the useless crap, but when I was finished Word was gone(note, I went through every single file and folder carefully, so I wouldn't delete it).

    I tried to search and start the .exe but it gives me an error about missing files. I looked online and I have to pay for Word...but I don't wanna :p.

    What the hell happened?
     
  2. Aimless

    Aimless Resident drunkey

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    :wtf:
     
  3. Slowmo

    Slowmo New Member

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    :werd:

    My thoughts exactly. All the problems I had before reformatting are gone now though :dunno:
     
  4. Scn64

    Scn64 Guest

    How do you reformat without erasing anything? :confused:
     
  5. Slowmo

    Slowmo New Member

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    Once again, I have absolutely no idea. It did disable EVERYTHING though...
     
  6. Scn64

    Scn64 Guest

    I'm not sure how you would get Word running again but, have you tried formatting a second time? :dunno:
     
  7. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Sounds like he reinstalled the OS over the old one. You have to reinstall word to get it to work again. you are missing all of the Registry entries for it (including the COM registrations).
     
  8. skybreaker

    skybreaker Guest

  9. 127.0.0.1

    127.0.0.1 New Member

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    sounds like you need to do a low level format, instead of the windows reformat as the only one
     
  10. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    You can't low-level format IDE drives. He didn't format it, he reinstalled without formatting.
     
  11. Aimless

    Aimless Resident drunkey

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    Um, I call bullshit?
     
  12. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    You can't low level an IDE drive. Low level formatting rewrites the drive geometry. This used to have to be done because drives used stepper motors to move the heads. The motors had a finite number of positions they could go to. Over time, the tracks would drift, so the heads would no longer land centered on the them. You would then Low Level format the drive, which would lay down a new drive geometry that matched the drive head positions. It also required using the drive controller BIOS to do, and required that the drive operate in native mode. The drives you could low level format where MFM, RLL, EDSI, and I think some early SCSI drives (*for the record, my first computer used a 40 meg MFM drive, and I have fond memories of using the cryptic drive controller format utilities).

    IDE drives use voice coils instead of stepper motors that allow an infinite range of motion for the drive head position over the platters from inside to outside. IDE drives use ZBR, zoned bit recording, and run in translation mode (vs. native mode). ZBR allows for variable numbers of sectors per track, instead of a fixed number like the old drives used. They also have control tracks that only the drive, not the PC, can access. The heads are aligned and the drive geometry is layed down at the factory. After that, it's set for the life of the drive. Only the manufacturer can LL format IDE drives. Same for SCSI these days.

    What most of you probably think of as a low level format is just a Zero Fill, where the PC instructs the drive to essentially overwrite all the data on the drive (including the boot sector) with 0's.
     
  13. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :werd:

    But yeah, do a new install and actually format the drive this time so it erases everything.
     
  14. Aimless

    Aimless Resident drunkey

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    Technically that's accurate, but a zero fill is what 99.9% of IT calls a low-level format these days. A true LLF can't be done on ANY (SCSI included) modern hard disk.

    Edit: I can't type.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2004
  15. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Yup. I normally wouldn't care too much about something like that, but there are enough people who don't know the difference but remember enough of the "old ways" that it causes some confusion. Confusion leads to broken stuff, which leads to phone calls, which usually leads to me asking some dumbass relative or friend (of god forbid customer) "you did what!?"
     

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