So I just disabled swap in Vista

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by eideteker, Jan 1, 2009.

  1. eideteker

    eideteker Who jarked off in my frakkin' coffee? OT Supporter

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    Am I going to regret it? I've got 4GB of RAM, and it doesn't seem to be using any more memory than it used to...everything seems to be running the same or slightly faster (could be the placebo effect though).
     
  2. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

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    i have just found it is better to let Windows control that stuff.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Disabling swap in Vista doesn't do what it used to do in XP, because Vista runs like Windows Server -- it caches as much stuff in RAM as it can, instead of putting it in the swapfile. By the time the Vista swapfile starts getting hit a lot, it's because you're out of RAM and you really do need the swapfile.

    As for whether you'll ever reach that point with 4GB of RAM...probably not for another couple of years.
     
  4. eideteker

    eideteker Who jarked off in my frakkin' coffee? OT Supporter

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    I'm going to play some graphics-intensive games and see what happens.
     
  5. notladstyle

    notladstyle New Member

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    windows swap doesnt store data until you max out physical memory.

    By disabling it you will not change anything except force a crash when you load a memory intensive game.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Windows XP swap does store data to free RAM. Windows Vista swap does not. This is an important distinction.
     
  7. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    This is not exactly true, programs can force data to the page file. Some programs do it to store large amounts of data to prevent running down physical memory. MS/SysInternals ProcMon is a good example of this. Granted, most software that does this wouldn't be running on a user PC, but if the page file is not there and a particular program expects it to be, it will freak out. Been there, done that, got the mug (they were out of t-shirts).
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    That's cool, the mug lasts longer.
     
  9. 1999TL

    1999TL New Member

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    Word.
     
  10. CodeX

    CodeX Guest

    Photoshop will not run without one, I know that.
     
  11. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

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    so, what's the point anyway? if you're not using the swap file, it shouldn't be any faster either way. it'll just save disk space. but, these days who is really concerned about disk space?
     
  12. Swerve

    Swerve OT Supporter

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    A Swap file is from a processes perspective just more RAM. The term is Virtual Memory and both the RAM and the SWAP file ( the hard drive) are both separated into fixed size areas (pages).

    Todays OSs don't fill RAM with the page file due to the programs running only require the most often used and locally located pages in memory 90 % of the time. An example of most used would be a variable used for loop counting, an example of locality would be an array.
     
  13. CodeX

    CodeX Guest

    No, the term is not virtual memory.

    I know I am just being an ass but virtual memory is the virtualization of the address space of program memory by the operating system. Each program gets a memory address space with a base of 0 (or 0x00000000). The only way this is possible is because the OS's memory manager keeps a map of the physical memory address that corresponds to the progams address of 0. This is virtualization of memory, and has nothing at all to do with the swap file.
     
  14. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    You're not being an ass, it's a valid point.

    In order to run more than one program at once, either each program has to know about all the others and be designed to run in its own pre-specified block of memory (at which point it's not really multiple programs anymore), or else the computer has to be able to make each program think it's running all by itself and then switch between programs every few milliseconds.

    In order to make each program think it's running by itself, it's necessary to translate each memory request a program makes into a real location somewhere in the RAM chips. This is what virtual memory does, and it's actually an integrated circuit hardwired onto the motherboard. (Well, nowadays I guess it's part of the Northbridge, but it used to be separate.)

    Anyway, the swap file is a totally different concept, and it doesn't have dedicated hardware -- the operating system handles the swap file instead. It could be done with dedicated hardware, but the hard drive is so slow that it doesn't matter how much time the OS wastes performing software calculations to manage the swap file. That's not the case with virtual memory, which has to run as fast as the CPU itself, because it gets used for every single command the CPU runs.
     

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