A&P so how do you set up white balance from a gray card in camera?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by White Stormy, Oct 24, 2008.

  1. White Stormy

    White Stormy Take that, subspace!

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    the Canon menu has a Custom WB option.. you select a picture to use.. then change the WB option to Custom.

    How does it pick the white balance out of the source picture? If I was to shoot a gray card, do I need to fill the frame with it? I don't see a way to select which part of the source image to use for WB..

    If it's really this difficult, I see why you guys all do it in photoshop.
     
  2. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    it's a pain in the ass.

    Yes, you need to fill it.

    post production > in camera custom

    try this - add it to your first image, shoot on auto WB, then when you import your set, select all of the images from the shoot, and use the white balance tool in LR or camera raw and click on the grey card from the first shot.

    it wil neutralize the grey card, removing any color cast, and apply those settings to your whole set.

    IMO, this is the only remotely plausible way to use a grey card digitally...
     
  3. NOR*CAL

    NOR*CAL OT Supporter

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    Use spot metering, and select it to the center.

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  4. White Stormy

    White Stormy Take that, subspace!

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    thanks
     
  5. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    wow all of your guys dont read your manuals... regardless of metering modes (you dont have to be in spot meter), CANON camera will automatically read from the 12-15% circle inteh center of your frame as your white balance.

    and fyi i wouldnt use a grey card for white balance.
     
  6. adamlewis88

    adamlewis88 New Member

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    Ive never used anything for WB.
    I take all my pictures on AWB and thats a true story.
     
  7. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    I have the black, grey and white cards on a lanyard on the way, I think the best option is to shoot raw and adjust wb off the white card in LR later. I think it might be possible to adjust exposure off the grey card in LR as well, I don't know.
     
  8. NOR*CAL

    NOR*CAL OT Supporter

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    According to my 5D manual, fill the spot metering circle with a 'plain white object', snap photo, and use as custom w/b.
     
  9. adamlewis88

    adamlewis88 New Member

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    WTF is a manual?
     
  10. White Stormy

    White Stormy Take that, subspace!

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    1D/5D > my 30D though :(
     
  11. White Stormy

    White Stormy Take that, subspace!

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    :rofl:
     
  12. NOR*CAL

    NOR*CAL OT Supporter

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    30D has spot metering, which is a major + over the 20D.
     
  13. White Stormy

    White Stormy Take that, subspace!

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    I usually use CWAVG :noes:.. I've never seen a difference when changing metering so :dunno:
     
  14. adamlewis88

    adamlewis88 New Member

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    Ive noticed I get some funky frames from the 5D but I honestly never had one from the MkIII. Whatever it used to figure out WB was VERY good :cool:

    When I do get an odd frame with the 5D though, I just click on something I know was white in the picture or I just adjust it to where it looks right. I care more about what LOOKS white more than what is exactly, definitely, scientifically, 255/255/255-ly white.

    Same thing with horizons. I care more that the horizon LOOKS level more than it actually IS level. It happens a lot with sports and end zones/goal posts/etc.
     
  15. wizeguy4

    wizeguy4 New Member

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    although it is called white ballance, you use a grey or neutral area of the image for adjusting it. the key word being "neutral" and grey is neutral
     
  16. ej25power

    ej25power OT Supporter

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    :rofl:
     
  17. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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  18. adamlewis88

    adamlewis88 New Member

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    I always operated under the assumption that a white card was for white balance (like an expodisc or the old coffee filter trick) while a gray card was for exposure.

    Like I said though, I have always used AWB and I meter off my hand or the playing surface for exposure. I personally think that with histograms and LCD screens, gray cards are a waste. I can see why people would use a white card for white balance, but Ive always had fine results just changing it myself if I need to in post :hs:
     
  19. Girth

    Girth ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ OT Supporter

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    Its relatively simple on my D300. Just go to the "pre" setup on the WB mode, hold it down until it flashes on the panel, take a shot on the card, then BAM... set!
     
  20. Dwight Schrute

    Dwight Schrute New Member

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    No, you use a gray card for white balance. The term white balance causes confusion; color balance is more accurate.

    From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_card:

    The first paragraph is talking about exposure with regards to a light meter, but a digital camera sensor operates the same way.

    For white balance, I prefer the second technique described in the last paragraph above. Shoot raw, take one photo of the gray card, shoot the rest of your photos, and then in post sync the white balance of all your photos with the photo of the gray card.

    There is so much confusion on this subject, especially in this forum. I think we need a sticky.
     
  21. ej25power

    ej25power OT Supporter

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    Same with my D50 and I'd wager very similar, if not the same with most Nikons.
     
  22. Girth

    Girth ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ OT Supporter

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    My D80 is the same way. I imagine you'd win that wager. :bigthumb:
     
  23. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Actually you can use a grey card for both exposure and white balance. However, I agree with you about adjusting WB in post.

    The times I've had to use a gray card for exposure are when I was shooting film and my subject was very light or white. I would take a reading off the grey card if I didn't have an incident meter with me.

    Today, I simply overexpose the subject (assuming it's white) by a couple of stops and chimp my histogram to make sure I'm not blowing out the highlights.
     
  24. Dwight Schrute

    Dwight Schrute New Member

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    Correct. That's what I was trying to say. The article I posted talks about using a gray card for both exposure and white balance.
     
  25. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    care to write up an edu on histogram reading? My xti has a r g b histogram, but I'm clueless on what it means and how to use it.
     

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