SRS Smoking Addiction

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by registeredPORK, May 2, 2008.

  1. registeredPORK

    registeredPORK Happy Poo Poo

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    I have a smoking addiction. It might not sound as bad at face value but, it really still is.

    I really want to stop... but I can't seem to find myself to stop.

    I think one of the reasons why it's so hard for me to stop is because I smoke when I'm angry, upset, frustrated, sad, annoyed... it's an emotional thing for me when I smoke. I smoke because its a psychological thing too... I like holding the butt in between my forefinger and my middle finger, the inhaling of the smoking and the exhaling.

    I don't know, maybe I'm an emotional smoker in general but it makes it that much harder...

    Has anyone, or does anyone feel this way about smoking? Was it hard? What did you do to help you?
     
  2. luke2o9

    luke2o9 New Member

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    I had smoked for 7 years (average 1 to 1.5 packs/day) before I finally stopped. I had probably tried to quit seriously 3 or 4 times in the past few years and never really lasted longer than a couple weeks. I know different people have different methods but for me, cold turkey worked. The reason I stopped was because smoking and dipping help cause gum recession in my mouth and I had to pay $6000 to have them do surgery to clean underneath my gums and to do 4 quadrant gum grafts. I think one of the best thing you can do to quit smoking is to start running and you'll realize how bad out of shape your lungs are. The more you run, IMO, the less you'll want to smoke. Oh, yes, I do still get cravings but for me it was the first 2 weeks that were the hardest. I got rid of my ashtrays (the one at home and in my car), got rid of my lighters and avoided social situation where I normally smoked. If you really want to quit, you'll be able to meet the challenge. Good luck on quitting.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2008
  3. I did quit for seven years during one period but I started again. At least for a couple of years, I only only took three puffs from each one. Now for a long time, I only take two puffs. I still feel the same satisfaction. I'll keep trying.
     
  4. Drifter87

    Drifter87 Yippi-kay-ay, Motherfucker

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    I use to be an emotional smoker, what I did is instead of smoking, was to find some other activity to replace smoking.

    Instead of having a cig I would go running, hit the gym, and I picked up a new hobby that would completely distract me.
     
  5. luke2o9

    luke2o9 New Member

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    My friend did laser therapy about 1 1/2 years ago, he was a heavy smoker and haven't had one since. http://stopsmokingnow.com/ It cost him $300 to get the treatment but he has saved so much more since he has stopped.
     
  6. Diesel Fumes

    Diesel Fumes Guest

    Talk to your doctor about Chantix. Or use patches. When you wear a patch you don't really want to smoke. And if you do, it usually makes you feel uneasy.

    I failed with patches though and went to Chantix and quitting was a breeze.
     
  7. Yail Bloor

    Yail Bloor OT Supporter

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    are you still on chantix, or have you stopped taking it?
     
  8. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    I was the same way. In fact, addressing the tactile portion of my smoking addiction was the key to helping me get and stay smoke free. It's been about 9 years now and I'm soo thankful I stuck with it.

    I used to patch to address the physical addiction to the drug nicotine. Then I used a number of techniques to address the tactile part.

    I would use ball point pens as cigs. I know, not the same thing but far safer. I would "smoke" my pen. No I wouldn't light it up but I would puff on it and flick it like it had ashes on it. I would roll it around in my fingers whenever I wanted a cig and I really would put it to my lips and then inhale just like I did a cig.

    This is important because most people breathe very shallow breaths. Only when smoking do they take deep breaths. Well I would do the same with the pen.

    Sometimes a pen was too heavy so I'd use a real cig....but not too many times. It was too close to the real thing and I really wanted to get off the cigs. I would use anything round, small and easy to manipulate.

    Sometimes I'd just sit there and do deep breathing exercises.

    No matter what, keep trying to get off of those damned cigs. It's totally worth all the effort you put into it and it's one of the best things you can do for your health.

    Anyways, good luck and be sure to search this forum. There have been many great suggestions over the years.
     
  9. Xicculus

    Xicculus OT Supporter

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    ^^ After 9 years, do you still have cravings or is it totally gone? I passed my 2 month mark a few days ago (or 8 weeks, which sounds much longer!) and I still do, from time to time. Wondering from your experience how long that lasted, or if it ever disappears completely.
     
  10. Woppin Wild

    Woppin Wild OT Supporter

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    I quit a couple of months ago after smoking 1-2 packs/day for the past four years, and me quitting was kind of out of the blue. I had been wanting to quit for a while (what smoker doesn't) and had been trying off and on to no avail (what smoker hasn't), but when I actually quit I wasn't even trying to.

    I had gotten sick with my typical biannual bronchitis/respiratory infection that was no doubt attributed to me smoking. After a few days it got to the point that I could barely breathe, let alone smoke. This wasn't the first time this had happened, in fact it has happened at least once a year for the past three years with more frequency lately, but this time I didn't want to smoke anymore after I started feeling better and was actually physically able to smoke again.

    The biggest thing that kept me from stopping before was that smoking was ingrained in everything I did. When I woke up I would have a cigarette, when I drove to work I would smoke two or three cigarettes, my first job of the day is Starbucks, and obviously coffee and cigarettes go hand in hand, so I would smoke like crazy on my breaks there. I would then come home and smoke in my house until my second job. I'd smoke a couple more cigarettes on the way to my second job which is delivering pizza, so all my night consisted of basically was driving around and smoking. I was ridiculous with the smoking.

    I think other than getting sick that there were three things that helped me stop. First, my grandpa died of cancer that started in the lungs and spread through the rest of his body this past December. He found out he was sick around Halloween and died on December 12. He was a very heavy smoker (~4 packs/day) from the time he was about 10 until eight or nine years ago when he completely stopped, but by the time he stopped it was obviously too late. So I didn't want to die at 67 like he did. I want a long healthy life that I'm able to enjoy. My second and third reasons are kind of tied together. My girlfriend has bad asthma and respiratory problems, but she smoked too in spite of her health problems. This has however caused her some very bad problems over the past year or so, and she gave up the habit about six or eight months ago. Her quitting kind of let me know that it is possible to quit (I obviously knew it was possible, it's just when someone close to you does it I think it makes it easier) while at the same time I knew that by me still smoking, her chance of relapsing back into smoking was much higher, and I would feel horrible if I were to cause that to happen. Also, due to her not being able to be around smoke, I started smoking outside or in the garage instead of in the house. If I wanted a cigarette I had to inconvenience myself in order to do it.

    Now that I've been without for a while I can feel my sense of smell coming back quite well. I sometimes get a whiff of the fabric softener on my shirt when bending down, or a whiff of my cologne, or any sort of light scent that I know I'd never be able to have smelled before. Speaking of smelling the fabric softener on my shirt or my cologne, I don't think anyone would have previously been able to smell that before because I basically just smelled like an ashtray. I like knowing that I smell good and not like I just walked out of a campfire. I actually went to my mom's house last week and she smokes inside, and smelling the smoke, especially in such a confined area, as well as on my clothes and everything grossed me out.

    I've also been snoring much less and am overall much less congested. My sleep is much more quality sleep, and it's kind of nasty, but I used to wake up in the morning or middle of the night with my nose filled with boogers from the smoking (my nose was actually almost constantly like this, but it was at its worst while I was sleeping), but that no longer happens. It's amazing how much better you feel with being able to easily breathe through your nose, especially while sleeping. I'm still coughing up some remnants of the garbage that's in my lungs, but nowhere near the smoker's cough or anything that I used to have. Overall, I'm feeling my health come back and it's an exciting feeling. I also feel happier and more positive now that I don't have to rely on a cancer stick to help uplift my mood or lift me out of a stressful time.

    I've had a few cravings, but they're not typical cravings. If I see someone smoking, I'll get a slight craving for the action of smoking, but if I smell the smoke from their cigarette I'm instantly turned off to it. I really think this is going to be me quitting smoking. I guess the best advice I can give as far as quitting is take the situations where you smoke the most and either avoid them, or if you can't avoid them, try to focus on the positive change that will occur after you quit smoking and replace the smoking with something that isn't harmful like chewing gum or toothpicks or something. For example, I loved smoking while I drove, but now I'm very happy that I won't be making my car smell like hell, and I won't be having ashes all over my car.

    I'm sorry for being so long winded. I just wanted to share my story and what I thought might help you to quit. Good luck on whatever you choose.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2008
  11. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    Most times, I don't crave a cig at all. In fact, after the first year my cravings pretty much dropped to nothing. I did have to fight the urge to light up for about 6-8 months or so.

    There are times when I do crave one....it's like, "get out of the fucking way, I need a cig" kind of thing. Thankfully I just keep putting off that cig till the next day. But you know...there's no one solution that helped me quit. I used every technique that I could think of and even some I heard from others. Just keep trying because you'll get there eventually.

    It does get easier....but it takes time. Don't quit 5 minutes before the miracle happens.
     
  12. 07

    07 18-1

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    Chantix is the craziest drug in the world. Do not even buy the patch or gum. Go straight for Chantix, it makes you not even think about smoking...it really is fucked up.

    (coming from a guy who would literally get sick to the stomach from stopping smoking)
     

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