Shoulders

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Rooster Cogburn, Feb 22, 2008.

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  1. Is it overkill to do front raises, laterals and military press all in the same workout? I do an upper/lower split right now.

    I guess I should add that I'm a beginner and definitely not trying to put the finishing touches on my physique or anything, just build a solid base. Should I just stick with military press right now maybe?
     
  2. retorq

    retorq What up bitch??

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    When I first started I did just military presses on my upper body days ...
     
  3. Boston George

    Boston George New Member

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    id say your fine then again im about to make a thread about over training.

    Try doing fronts and sides. get like 10lb dbs and raise them straight out fron your sides and then down and then raise them in front of you... Killer exercise
     
  4. michael

    michael FLORIDA > *

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    dont bother with the front raises. chances are you cheat enough on your other exercises or do enough benching that they get hit plenty.

    lateral raises
    db/bb presses
    arnolds
    chest supported rear delt flyes
     
  5. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Often when the deltoid muscle becomes dominant as the person performs shoulder abduction, the humeral head glides superiorly because the downward pull of the rotator cuff muscles is insufficient and cannot counterbalance the upward pull of the deltoid. As the humerus continues to abduct, the compression forces generated by the deltoid muscle maintain the humerus in this position. If the same person flexes rather than abducts the humerus, the movement impairment is not evident. This can be explained by the reduced participation of the deltoid muscle. During flexion, the primary activity is in the anterior portion, which is just one third of the muscle, as compared with activity of the entire deltoid muscle during abduction.

    Another dominance pattern involves the posterior deltoid. When the posterior deltoid has become the dominant lateral rotator, the result is anterior glide of the humeral head during the motion. One of the most challenging aspects of developing exercises for the rotator cuff muscles is ensuring that the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles are participating optimally and that the posterior deltoid muscle is not the primary rotator. One method of assessing the degree of participation of the different lateral rotators is to monitor the head of the humerus during the motion and not just the distal motion of the humerus. In the prone position with the shoulder in 90 degrees of abduction, the elbow flexed to 90 degrees, and the forearm over the edge of the table, the patient is instructed to laterally rotate the shoulder. The therapist places his of her fingers under the humeral head to monitor the motion. The humeral head should not anteriorly glide and exert pressure against the therapist's fingers. When the deltoid is dominant, in addition to the humeral anterior glide, the shoulder often extends, and the posterior deltoid muscle belly becomes prominent with dimpling evident just inferior to the posterior deltoid muscle belly. When the teres minor and infraspinatus are the dominant lateral rotators, the motion is pure rotation and the head of the humerus is pulled toward the glenoid and does not glide anteriorly. Careful performance of this exercise is critical to correction of rotator cuff dysfunction.
     
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