TAT should I be worried?

Discussion in 'Vaginarium' started by IntheWorks, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    It's been a week since I got my new tatto done and I'm still swollen and pretty sore, and it's starting to get really red at the base of the tattoo on the back side of my leg. I've been getting really bad cramps in my leg and when I wake up in the morning it hurts to stand..... I don't remember my other tattoo being this bad, although it isn't as detailed or as big....

    it's red right at the bottom below the blue.... this pic was the day after it was done, so the redness isn't there.
    [​IMG]

    I've followed the instructions that were given to me to a T, I used only dial anti bacterial soap and a curel fragrance/dye free lotion? could something like the soap be irratating my skin?
     
  2. Nickos

    Nickos Active Member

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    id ditch the dial anti bacterial.. ive found it to be way too harsh.. its a week old, new skin is already over the tattoo, keep usint the lotion but washing it regularly is overkill and is probably hindering the healing process and adding irritation
     
  3. Sparky511

    Sparky511 Leben ist gut.

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    Are you putting on any ointment or anything? Are you still shaving it? (Or has your hair just not grown back?)
     
  4. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    nope... not using anything other than soap and curel.... the hair is starting to grow back now.....
     
  5. Sparky511

    Sparky511 Leben ist gut.

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    I am a firm believer in A&D ointment. Give that a try, and a milder soap maybe.
     
  6. Bharnz

    Bharnz New Member

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    From my shop's tattoo care sheet
    To ensure that your tattoo lasts, It is necessary to follow these simple rules.
    1. Keep it covered for at LEAST 3 hours. Your tattoo is basically a wound, and must be covered for 3 hours. (Over night is best)
    2. After you remove the bandage, use a washcloth, with warm water and soap to scrub off any mini scabs that have started to form, pat dry with clean towel, and allow to air dry 10 minutes.
    3. Apply a THIN layer of ointment to the tattoo, BE SURE to blot off excess, because keeping the tattoo covered with ointment will cause the ink to be ejected out of the skin, causing a faded looking tattoo.
    4. Apply a good quality, non perfume lotion, to
    the tattoo 2-3 times a day. Lubriderm is recommended. BLOT OFF EXCESS.
    5. Your tattoo may scab up or become flaky for up to 10 days, DO NOT PICK ANY SCABS, picking scabs, WILL PULL OUT INK.
    6. When washing the tattoo, after the first day, use only your hands soap and water, rub lightly, do not try to remove scabs or flaky skin, it can take 4-16 days for your tattoo to look bright and clear.
    The first week or so, colors will not appear bright. As it heals, it will brighten, and colors will look better. DO NOT PICK SCABS !!!!!
    7. Wear loose clothing.
    DO NOTS
    DO NOT allow your tattoo to become excessively wet, no baths, swimming, hot tubs, or soaking in water for 10 days, showers are OK.
    DO NOT pick scabs or itch your tattoo.
    DO NOT use alcohol or hydrogen peroxide on your tattoo.
    DO NOT use anti bacteria ointments, such as neosporin, bacatracin, or similar products.
    DO NOT re-bandage your tattoo, air must reach your tattoo, it is better to keep it dry.
    www.TATTUZ.com
     
  7. Nickos

    Nickos Active Member

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    when were these aftercare sheets created? some of that stuff is very outdated information...



    This is modern wound healing technique which can be documented in the literature. == During a tattoo the skin secretes fluid forming droplets on the surface. If the blood particles in the fluid dry on the surface they stick on the surface looking like little black specs. If allowed to remain without being wiped off or removed (gently) they adhere strongly to the surface like glue and other damaged cells and particles accumulate. They dry and begin scab formation. Scabbing prolongs the healing process because epithelial cells must grow beneath this heavy burden scab to seal the skin. Eventually though the skin will heal (in spite of the obstacles created.) Scab creation is not Best Practice because it takes longer to heal.

    Presuming minimal physical damage to the skin, the speed of healing is related to the amount of moisture in the area. Remember, a properly done tattoo by a professional should heal completely within 3 to 4 days without scabbing provided best healing practices are used. The three top rated healing ointments are Bacitracin Zinc, A & D Ointment and Petroleum. It is the petroleum in all three products that produces the best healing speed because it makes the skin occlusive. Occlusive means neither water nor air can penetrate to the skin surface. The skin responds to an occlusive condition by providing moisture to the area internally creating the ultimate healing condition.

    When a tattoo is just finished there is generally no oozing (exudate) and the surface is relatively dry (an indication that the procedure did not excessively damage the skin). When a petroleum product is applied (an occlusive condition is created) droplets of fluid will begin to appear because the body is producing exudate. The liquid exudate is necessary to create an environment which stimulates rapid wound healing; the clear exudate should not be washed off. By allowing the area to dry (which we should not), the beneficial cells are removed, cells dry, cells die and even serve as a bacteria medium. A wound maintained in a moist environment with exudate has a lower infection rate than a wound which is dry.

    Because this mechanism of the body was not understood it was thought petroleum caused ink to leave the skin because when it was applied the skin began to ooze. Today we know this view is not true. Three or four days is required for new epidermal cells to grow across the surface. Damaged cells will float on the top of the new cells until removed. Light amounts of petroleum-containing lotions should be continued for another week but Bacitracin or other anti-bacterial containing ointments, if used, should not be used for more than 3 or 4 days - read the box. The constant application of antibacterials is not necessary to avoid infection and will actually interfere with the wound healing process. All antibacterials interfere with the wound healing process. An ideal procedure (Best Practice - and yes there are Best Practices): immediately after the tattoo is finished apply a petroleum based ointment and watch the area for oozing and droplet formation (instead of bandaging and sending the client away). If the droplets that ooze to the surface are pink they should be dabbed off carefully, or the area lightly rubbed periodically to prevent platelet and dead cell buildup. Removing those little black specs as soon as they appear will speed healing. This should be repeated until no pink oozing is seen and the area is clear colored. Now the client has a good chance for the fastest healing. After this, the ointment should be applied heavily enough to look shiney. Too thin and the surface will dry and prolong healing. Ointment applying and the plastic wrap for the shower or sleeping for a few days will help protect the tattoo from getting wet or damaaged under these adverse conditions.

    Procedures that recommend immediate bandaging and being left on for several hours or day and then the area washed, or washed every day or several times a day are not conducive to speedy healing. That is not best practice.

    Bandaging is necessary if the area may be irritated or exposed to foreign matter. Otherwise it is not necessary. Usual practice by those with tons of tattoos is just to rub ointment on almost continuously and forget about bandaging, etc.

    Washing interferes and prolongs healing but should be done if dead cells have been allowed to accumulated on the surface. Allowing the tattoo to accumulate dead cells and other necrotic matter for 8 or 24 hours is counter-productive to healing speed and will then require washing to remove as much of the dead material as possible. So you can see that washing is what has to be done because the initial hours of the tattoo created a bad condition for healing. Instructions recommending washing show the technique is wrong from the get-go. Good tattoo technique will produce preliminary healing in 3-4 days and should not be attributed to any new miracle healing preparation we have discovered or been sold, but to the healing abilities of the skin, the good tattoo technique of minimal damage and good aftercare with a petroleum product.

    There are plenty of promoters of "miracle" new healing preparations who want to separate you from your money. Their concoctions do not promote healing any more than plain petroleum.

    Reactions to antibacterial ointments look like small pimples around the area of application in which case the ointment should be discontinued and a moisturizer applied until healed. All moisturizers are not created equal. Look for one that contains more petrolatum. If it sinks right into your skin, like Curel, you will be better off with a brand that remains more on the surface.

    There are many different procedures followed for tattoo healing that have been used for years by different artists. Any one could be argued for based on the artist's individual testimony and experience: "My customers healed." The reason for the healing is often attributed to the wrong cause because there is no understanding of the healing process of the skin and what produces ideal conditions for repair. It should be kept in mind that it is the skin itself that does the work of repair, not us, and will repair itself, sooner or later, not because we are doing or using x, y or z, but in spite of the challenges we present to the skin. Tattoos heal sooner or later. If anyone continues using outdated aftercrae instructions well that's the end of the story. The most we can do is tell, can't force anyone to think rationally.
     
  8. S.N.A.F.U.

    S.N.A.F.U. Guest

    WELL SAID! :bowdown:
     
  9. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    Damnit..... so... should I not be using curel? that's what my tattoo guy told me to use.....
     
  10. CyberBullets

    CyberBullets I reach to the sky, and call out your name. If I c

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    use lubiderm unscented moisturizer.

    Anti-bacterial is probably what's causing the irritation and the pain.
     
  11. Bharnz

    Bharnz New Member

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    Thats a real good read, but most people do not even read the most simple instructions, alot of good info in there, . the instructions I posted, work for my clients, but to each their own, I have some customers swear by BAG BALM, and wont use anything else, others swear by Noxema, and you cant tell them anything Different.
    A few of my clients will use nothing at all, and they heal fine,,
    If it works do it, :big grin:
     
  12. pir8penguin

    pir8penguin Guest

    i think the biggest issue with after care instructions are for newbs and first timers. sure, your customers that have done more have figured out what works for them. i think nickos' post referes to techniques that should be safe and work reasonably well for anybody caring for ink. it's especially interesting to somebody considering their first tattoo.
     
  13. Nickos

    Nickos Active Member

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    yea exactly.. myself i prefer the oclusive bandage method.. same thing used for serious burns in the hospitals
     

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