A&P Shooting interiors, help

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by coughlin's law, Dec 20, 2007.

  1. Previously I have shot interiors armed with my Sigma 10-20mm on my XT, the pictures were okay but I knew there was more I could do to enhance my photos.

    Previously before I shot with these settings;

    ISO: 400 or 800
    TV: 0"3
    WB: Tungsten

    I felt I wasn't getting the full potential of a room so now I ask the following...

    1. What is the right aperture for shooting interiors?
    2. Would a speedlight help naturally light up a space, as compared to standard flash?
    3. What evaluative mode should I use?
     
  2. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    smaller - somewhere around 16?
    a speedlite is a flash, not a 'magical flash'
    use your brain + histogram
     
  3. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    :werd:
     
  4. redna

    redna New Member

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    No, actually a speedlight is a NIKON flash... thus making it magic and anything but standard.
     
  5. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    One light isn't going to "magically" make your interior pictures great. Study some good examples of interior shots and you'll see that they are a combination of:

    1. Camera placement/lens selection (putting the camera at eye level isn't always the best choice for interior shots)

    2. Lighting (time or day is critical or if using extra lights, placement of lights is crucial. Watch the shadows and use a lot of soft light in the foreground and "sharper" lighting in the background)

    3. Set design (or set dressing/props)

    4. Extremely sharp throughout the pic (using either a wide angle lens or small f/stop or both)
     
  6. I've been playing around with my camera often... and I've thought of some ways;

    Shoot F/8 or lower, use an exposure of 0"6 or 1... I'm still trying to figure out which Metering mode to use with the right AF Focus (One shot, AI Focus, AI Servo)

    1. Also, next question... is it possible to include normal looking windows (with a blue sky included, or say part of a building included?) as if the image goes together as a whole...

    2. How do I avoid blowing out the high lights? How many lights should be turned on in a place?
     
  7. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    for a scene that doesn't move, don't worry about the shutter time. Set the ISO as low as possible, set the aperture to what you want for depth etc, then adjust the shutter time to get the correct exposure, there is no 'right' time to use.

    Focus manually or set your af point on the main detail of the image (as long as it make for suitable DOF). Look up depth of field, hyperfocal distance. Keep in mind that DOF is something like 1/3rd in front of where you focus and 2/3rds behind.

    If you use AF set it to One Shot as it should be more accurate for stationary subjects.

    windows might need to be done as a second exposure and blended in your pp. lights should probably be off unless they can be adjusted down to come close to ambient light levels.
     

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