A&P shooting interiors again... help?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by coughlin's law, Nov 4, 2007.

  1. so i'm trying to figure out how to take photos such as these;

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jonny Chimpo

    Jonny Chimpo OT Supporter

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    good light + skill
     
  3. skill? i must be missing something
     
  4. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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    exactly
     
  5. skolen

    skolen Guest

    Yea, that would be skill then. If you don't know what that is.
     
  6. I don't know what kind of skill is needed, does it mean to get a speedlite as well?
     
  7. kristin

    kristin my dog > *

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    Speedlight would fall under light category :hsugh:

    Didn't we already have this whole interior shooting discussion?
     
  8. nicklk

    nicklk New Member

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    I think you will need 13 speedlites to produce the product you showed above
     
  9. so it's not equipment....
     
  10. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    I'll give you the benefit of the doubt here, and think you wrote this as sarcasm.


    These interior shots are shot one of two ways...

    1: a VERY small aperture and a LOOOONG exposure. (this is my bet, especially considering they're for work...)

    2: A realistic version of HDR where you use multiple exposures to only select highlight and shadow areas and blend them.

    Either way, there is some major post processing going on here. None of it too difficult, but it's definitely there.

    Oh, and it's a large part natural light. I'd say the speedlights are minimal here. All of the reflections I see can easily be explained by the window locations and amount of natural light coming in. There are no missing shadows or pointed shadow trails...
     
  11. Most of my interior shots have had limited light, a window or 2 per room... :ugh:
     
  12. When I was shooting yesterday, I was shooting 1"6 and 1"3 per room... had a tripod and shot under Tungesten
     
  13. nicklk

    nicklk New Member

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    100% sarcasm was used

    Post some of your results, it may help us, help you
     
  14. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    Oh shit.

    Didn't realize who's post I was commenting on.... Ignore that....
     
  15. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    shoot raw, auto WB (there are a ton of different light sources in that room...), Aperture priority and f22.

    see what you come out with.
     
  16. Here's one that had only 2 windows, located in the living room, that I shot with my back to;

    [​IMG]
     
  17. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Ultra wide angle lenses.
     
  18. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Also, it's nice to have a nice looking interior to start with. Both of those rooms are well decorated.
     
  19. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    ok, thats not bad....

    But that doesn't have NEARLY the natural light of the one you posted, so you'd greatly benefit from some additional rear fill light.

    You can do this with either a good flash bounced off of the ceiling, or a halogen work light or two sitting behind you.

    Just watch our for shadows coming from the halogens.
     
  20. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    Oh. and turn those lights off.

    In his shots, all of the lights are turned off except the ones under the sink. The hanging lights are turned off, but look bright because there reflecting the natural light. You don't want to blow out the light sources, OR get the reflections on the floor.

    Look at your examples... Notice any reflections created by the ceiling lights?

    edit: Not to mention, once you eliminate those light sources, you'll be able to increase the exposure time a TON more, giving you a much more even exposure, and much more detail.
     
  21. I'd hate to ask to do another reshoot... would photoshop benefit any of this? Yeah, and for the natural light -- most rooms only had 1 window... :jerkit:
     
  22. Another room, no lights... different apartment

    [​IMG]
     
  23. SenenCito

    SenenCito OT Supporter

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    I know its been covered already but just thought I would add to this

    WordNet home page
     
  24. Fucker

    Fucker out of the fast lane, bitches

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    I agree. Also, looks like a wide angle lens, probably on a view camera as the perspective has been corrected, though that could have been done in post.
     
  25. Jonny Chimpo

    Jonny Chimpo OT Supporter

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    First, expose for the highlights and fill the shadows. Repeat after me: expose for the highlights and FILL the shadows. Use strobe or bounces, and flag unwanted highlights.

    Second, DON'T MIX LIGHT TEMPS! Either gel the room lights to match the color temp of strobes/ambient or don't bloody use them.

    Third, if you have to/want to use room lights replace the bulbs with cheap AC slaves such as: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/89950-REG/Morris_11160_AC_Bare_Bulb_Screw_In.html

    Fourth, shoot ISO100 (max), aperture priority or manual and use F/11 or smaller.

    Fifth, a perspective correction lens (shift lens) will come in handy to eliminate converging vertical lines. Or use software to produce the same results.

    Finally, use appropriate photoshop tools. The objective is to have even, natural light without looking overly fake, so that all of the interiors details are visible. Shadow/Highlight and curves are your friends. Quick, careless and rushed example:

    [​IMG]
    *note how the light in the foreground is green and the light in the background is red? That's because of the mixed light source temperatures.


    You should probably know that all of the better interior shots I've seen any behind the scenes stuff on have ALL been composite images. Don't be afraid of shooting multiple exposures and merging the results. You don't have to create the shot with just a single frame.
     

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