A&P shooting in the subway

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Fedaykin, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. Fedaykin

    Fedaykin New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0
    How do you shoot in the subway using only existing light? Use a faster film?
     
  2. 00soul

    00soul halfsharkalligatorhalfman

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    28,325
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    the overlook hotel
    that's one way to help out
     
  3. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    9,484
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Amish Country, PA
    Tripod would also help immensely.
     
  4. quickmex

    quickmex New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2005
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ormond/Tampa
    Faster film, tripod, open the lens all the way up, underexpose then push the film when processing, etc.
     
  5. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,666
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    San Bernardino, CA
    9mm, or a .22 right against the person.

    Ohh fuck sorry, wrong thread. :hs:
     
  6. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    12,878
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Texas
    Pull the fire alarm. Those strobes will definitely add a little light.

    Seriously, faster film, larger aperture settings, slower shutter, flash (but you might get detained by homeland security, creating a terrorist plot to blind subway drivers)

    Use ISO 800 instead of ISO 100. Then open the aperture up some, and slow down your shutter.
     
  7. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,666
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    San Bernardino, CA
    :bowdown:
     
  8. lilcheen

    lilcheen New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2003
    Messages:
    2,386
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jax, FL

    when using a large aperture, will a longer shutter decrease the bookeh or make it more blurry?
     
  9. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,666
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    San Bernardino, CA
    Bokeh has nothing to do with shutter speed.
     
  10. After reading the thread title I was expecting to see a dead body in the subway or something.. :dunno:
     
  11. lilcheen

    lilcheen New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2003
    Messages:
    2,386
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jax, FL
    sorry, i meant sharp
     
  12. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,666
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    San Bernardino, CA
    Well, long exposures shots should be on a tripod.

    Unless you are asking about how much stuff will be in focus with a large aperature lens. Dof= not so much.


    Use a wide angle and a flash.
     
  13. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,666
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    San Bernardino, CA
    Actually fuck use whatever you want, just bounce your 580ex.
     
  14. lilcheen

    lilcheen New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2003
    Messages:
    2,386
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jax, FL
    lol. i was really out of it last night, thats what i was trying to say, with a large apeture, would a longer shutter increase what would be in focus?
     
  15. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,666
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    San Bernardino, CA
    No.
     
  16. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,134
    Likes Received:
    90
    Location:
    east coast
    a longer shutter speed (used with your camera on a tripod) would allow you to use a smaller aperature (which increases depth of field) however anything that moves would be blurry due to the longer shutter speed. For most situations in dim light, faster film is the answer even if you're shooting with a flash. Faster film allows you to still capture some of the overall background while using a flash to light the foreground. The trick is to use a diffusion over the flash to soften the light and cut down on it's intensity.
     

Share This Page