setting up a wireless network in my house

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by sleev, Oct 8, 2003.

  1. sleev

    sleev It's sleep, life, and death It's speed, coke, and

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    I'm probably going to set up a wireless network in my house (the cables through the wall thing looks like too much of a pain in the ass). I'll probably try to use the G standard and a linksys hub.

    Anyone done this yet? Any serious pitfalls or loss of bandwidth through walls? Any advice/stories/or warnings are appreciated.

    :yum:
     
  2. bandit320

    bandit320 Guest

    I use the linksys setup, not a problem at all. I wouldnt reccomend putting the router in a basement tho, i didnt get quite the range as when i put it on my first floor
     
  3. Seeker

    Seeker Guest

    I too have a Linksys setup (802.11b) and it works really well. The router is on the second floor and offers great signal anywhere in the house. It was also ridiculously easy to install and that's always a good benefit.
     
  4. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

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    Learn how to secure it so people can't sit outside your house on your connection. ;)
     
  5. sleev

    sleev It's sleep, life, and death It's speed, coke, and

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    yeah, I saw some maximum pc review on a device you can use to find wifi spots. I'm not to worried about it though, I live in Cul de Sac so it would look suspicious if someone sat there all day in their car.
     
  6. Little Spunky $#!T

    Little Spunky $#!T :cool:

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    I'm havin a hell of at time with a small wireless network. I run the cables, but for my laptop I have a PCI card in the server, going to the pcmcia card in my laptop (G)..... The strength sucks for some reason :dunno:
     
  7. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    http://www.cantenna.com

    That should solve all your signal strength problems. :)

    But be sure you turn on the MAC address filter and WEP encryption (You'll have to do it on both the router and all the wireless NICs). It's amazing how many wireless networks are wide open, and anybody can just attach and do anything.
     
  8. sleev

    sleev It's sleep, life, and death It's speed, coke, and

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    thanks for all the good advice!

    :bowdown:
     
  9. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

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    :o :o :o
     
  10. FLY-FAST

    FLY-FAST OT Supporter

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    Get the WRT54G - it's easy to configure and has four ports on the back if you change your mind. Just remember to enable encryption - that way your files are secure, and your neighbors can't use your bandwidth with netsniffer...
     
  11. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    Whoa, there, I wouldn't go so far as to say WEP encryption makes your network secure. There's a reason why it's called WEP. Stands for Wired Equivalent Protocol, meaning that with WEP enabled, your wireless network will be as secure as a standard wired network. But that's not even the case.

    It won't keep out somebody determined to get in. Programs like airsnort can calculate the key after capturing packet transmissions for only a minute or two.

    It makes it more secure than not using it. That's all.
     

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