Server mobo used for home PC?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Repentinus, Aug 26, 2005.

  1. Repentinus

    Repentinus New Member

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    I recently read an article in Maximum PC where they built a Dream Machine. It was very very nice. 2 CPUs, 2 video cards, 2 Terabytes of storage....like I said very nice.

    Well the mobo they use in it is a Tyan K8WE S2895, which is a server mobo, and the procs they use are AMD Opteron 275s, which are server procs. Now can this be used for any PC? Even one at home?

    Why is it given the designation of a server proc and mobo? If it can be used in a home PC is there any special considerations I need to take?
     
  2. Goonigoogoo

    Goonigoogoo Active Member

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    Depends entirely what the server will be used for. We sell our software here which it and the data is stored on a server consisting of a ASUS P4-P800SE, P4 2.8 to 3.2 ghz depending on how much he wants to spend and 512 or 1gb ram. The OS is SCO Open server 5.0.6. Our software doesn't need much CPU power to run, a 486 could do the job.

    So it totally depends what you need the server for.
     
  3. Repentinus

    Repentinus New Member

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    I wouldn't use it for a server. I would use it for gaming pretty much. Well playing Warcraft 3, Doom 3, watching a movie and Surfing the web. God I love technology!
     
  4. huntz0r

    huntz0r New Member

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    "Server" motherboards are usually perfectly standard in most respects, they just have a different feature set which is oriented toward use in servers. For instance dual processors, two (or more) integrated NICs, onboard SCSI, 64-bit PCI, greater memory capacity with ECC support, etc. Higher-end ones will often have a more specialized chipset, ie. Serverworks. Dual-processor boards will most likely be in Extended ATX format, requiring a full tower case to hold them, and may require a less common power standard.

    The main disadvantage to using a "server" board as the basis for a home PC or workstation is cost: they tend to be 2-3 times as expensive as your average $100-120 "nice" desktop board. Usually you'll find boards in an in-between range, designated as SOHO server/workstation, such as the Tyan Tiger series. Boards which are specialized for server use can also perform worse for some tasks (Serverworks chipsets are not so great for workstations) or lack features that are useless in a server environment but may be desirable in a desktop.

    While in the past dual boards have been desirable in certain situations, the advent of dual-core processors has instantly put an end to them in a desktop role. A single-socket board for Intel 754/T or AMD 939 can already support a dual-core processor, and more than that is entirely pointless for desktop use; quad-processing, while useful in server roles, has no real benefit on the desktop (witness the mixed-bag performance of Pentium D with HyperThreading enabled). Even dual processors are of no use at all for gaming, although they do keep the system much more responsive for multitasking.

    Of course, pure geek appeal remains, but that really is the only reason to want a dual-socket board anymore, and simultaneously is what retarded builds like the MaximumPC dual-everything rig appeal to. If that's worth an extra grand to you though, go right ahead. :p
     
  5. col_panic

    col_panic calm like a bomb Moderator

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    best '05 i've read :bigthumb:
     
  6. XR250rdr

    XR250rdr OT Supporter

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    :werd:

    I'd like to add that this has been tossed around for years. The consensus has never changed: dual proc boards are a waste for home use.
     
  7. Repentinus

    Repentinus New Member

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    Nice huntz...thanks! :bigthumb:
     

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