Seagate Barracuda shows 300 GB instead of 320 GB

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Jago, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. Jago

    Jago It helps if you hit it.

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    Bought two of these ST3320620AS drives from Newegg at the same time for a new build. One shows up as 300 GB (279 GB useable) instead of 320 GB (298 GB useable). Ran the Seagate DiscWizard utility and it shows the same thing. I'm using a Gigabyte DS3 motherboard. Any ideas?

    Here's the Newegg link:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16822148140

    And screenshots of the two drives:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2007
  2. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Definitely something wrong there. Your best move is to contact Seagate.
    They have great customer service, and they will take care of it promptly.
     
  3. mace

    mace i don't read

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    Well you're never going to get 320GB the way windows sees it because of the way windows and manufactures measure their drives.

    Manufacturers see 320GB as 320 billion bytes, while windows sees it as 298 GiB

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=320+billion+bytes+in+GB

    Now why you only get 279GB on one drive I have no idea. You don't have any other partitions on it?
     
  4. Jago

    Jago It helps if you hit it.

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    None at all. :dunno:
     
  5. Jago

    Jago It helps if you hit it.

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    Thanks, I'll give them a call this afternoon.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    The difference between drives measured by n*1000^i versus n*1024^i has been discussed before, and one would hope that most everybody is at least passingly-familiar with the concept by now. The problem this particular person is having is most likely a mis-labeled drive.
     
  7. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    It's not even mislabeled though - those ST codes are internal to the HD itself. Kind of interested in how this turns out - just out of curiosity - switch IDE controllers on the drives - see if the problem follows the drive or the controller.
     
  8. Jago

    Jago It helps if you hit it.

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    These are SATA drives but I'll try moving them around tonight. I talked to Seagate and they said to RMA it. The tech had no idea what was wrong.

    Funny thing is, I found some other guys having trouble with this model drive on another forum:

    http://whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies-archive.cfm/597604.html
     
  9. keleko

    keleko yes, he is

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    a) formatting

    b) bits vs. bytes, which leads to

    c) marketing
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Once again...

    The difference between the label on the disk and the readout in Device Manager is that the manufacturer says 1MB = 1000KB = 1000000B, whereas Windows says that 1MB = 1024KB = 1048576B. The apparent discrepancy only gets worse from there, but the actual number of bytes is exactly the same. (on a side note, the fact that 1B = 8b has nothing to do with the issue, because nobody measures disk space in bits.)

    You can argue (and you are arguing) that the hard drive companies are marketing their drives as being bigger than they really are, but I argue that computer programmers are so mired in the concept of binary math that they forget normal people measure things in powers of 10, not powers of 2. So who's right? I'm gonna side with the hard drive companies -- even if they are profiting from the discrepancy -- simply because the unit of measurement they use makes sense to 95% of the industrialized world, instead of the other 5%.
     

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