MIL Scope For M16

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by hooahrcr, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. hooahrcr

    hooahrcr Chris_Hearn

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    i need info on where to get one website with pics would help a great deal thanks in advance
     
  2. DaRkPhAnToM

    DaRkPhAnToM FML OT Supporter

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  3. hooahrcr

    hooahrcr Chris_Hearn

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    are there any cheaper one out there
     
  4. Ranger-AO

    Ranger-AO I'm here for the Taliban party. Moderator

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    holy buttwipe! :eek3:
     
  5. footratfunkface

    footratfunkface New Member

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    What's your application? Meaning, what are you wanting to do with it?

    If this is your primary weapon, you probably don't want a normal telescopic optic, as it will pretty much eliminate your ability to conduct CQB properly. If you go with something like a 3x ACOG, you can still do CQB just fine. There are a lot of cool things about the ACOG, but there are other options. I'll go into two major options, which are also the two most popular, and they're both issued by the US military.

    The first is the ACOG. Number one, yes, they're expensive. Welcome to the world of quality gear. But they're not as expensive as the MSRP listed on the site. You'd have to look around to see who's got them in stock, but the best deals are always online, and most often listed on ar15.com.

    Okay. Now, with an ACOG, you have magnification. It's low-power, like 3.5 or 4x. This allows you to use it in close somewhat. However, 3x will not be useful indoors, and 3.5 or 4x will be even worse, so if building clearing is an issue, you might want to rethink a magnified optic. The other awesome feature of the ACOG line is the Bindon Aiming Concept. Basically, what it does is, you keep both eyes open, look through the optic, and sight in upon your target. Your brain will combine the two images, and basically impose one upon the other. You'll have one picture, with the reticle over your target. This gives you a large field of view, and you can practice to focus back and forth betwixt your eyes when you need to. It's really rather cool. I'm not sure if ACOGs are parallax-free. Parallax is the shift in the apparent point of aim that is caused by moving your head. Basically, if you're using iron sights, and you move your head, your sights are no longer in line with what you're looking at. Without parallax, you look at the reticle in an optic, and no matter how much you move your head, if you can still see the reticle, it's still on your target. That's also a nice feature if ACOG's indeed have it. ACOG's have either a tritium illumination, or both fiber optic and tritium illumination of the reticle. This allows you to see in the daytime or night. If you were BUYING an ACOG, the two to look at are the TA11F and the TA31F. They're the ones you want for using on the flattop of an AR15/M16 series rifle. The big difference is just magnification. I'd go with the lower of the two if there's even a possibility of CQB.

    The other option is the Aimpoint. Now, the military issues far more Aimpoints (M68's) than ACOG's. They're cheaper, and that's probably why. Aimpoints are a zero-magnification optic. They are what's known generally as a red-dot optic. They have a clear view, except the red 4 MOA dot over your target. Now, Aimpoints ARE parallax free, and the model issued to most troops is NV compatible. The CompM2 and CompM3 are the two Aimpoint models that are most popular, with the M3 being the newest one out. The M3 is available with a 2 MOA dot, which is smaller, and better for more precise distance shooting. What the Aimpoint models lack is magnification. That's where Aimpoint's newest product comes into play: The 3x magnifier. The magnifier is exactly what it sounds like: it's a magnifier that goes between your eye and the Aimpoint, and gives you a 3x magnification, similar to an ACOG. The price of an Aimpoint and the magnifier actually comes out to right at the price of an ACOG. And the magnifier can be fitted with quick-detaching mounts, so you can instantly remove the magnifier for close-range shooting, and just use the straight up Aimpoint. The ACOG does not have any ability to do anything but be there, or be NOT there. You can get quick-detach mounts for it as well, but in order to remove an ACOG, you'd have to pop two levers, remove it, put it somewhere, then flip up your backup iron sights, then acquire the target. That's a bit slower than flipping a lever and using an Aimpoint that's already on and running. Aimpoints run on batteries, but the life of the batteries is around 50,000 hours on the M3. That, by the way is about 5 years, 8 1/2 months worth of life, if you left it on the brightest setting you'll ever hope to use it on the whole time. Realistically, you'll probably never use it on even half bright.

    The magnifier for Aimpoints works on other red-dot sights as well, so it's very versatile. Now, if you're in the military, you may be able to get an Aimpoint or an ACOG issued to you. If that's the case, cost is not an issue. But let us know what exactly you're wanting to do with it, and we'll be better able to help you out.

    Aimpoint Comp M3
    Aimpoint 3x Magnifier
    Trijicon TA11F
    Trijicon TA31F
     

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