GUN school me on gun care please?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by huntz0r, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. huntz0r

    huntz0r New Member

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    Okay, been playing with my Ruger Mark II for a while now. I took it apart once it cleaned it out, wiped it down, and poured oil all over the bolt before reassembly. But I really don't know what the hell I'm doing here and can't find any guides for clueless n00bs like myself, the manual is totally a big help ("Clean and lube the gun regularly, I will assume you aren't stupid and know how, this page intentionally left blank')

    I see people talk about the 3 different lubes they use and all I got is this cleaner oil stuff for squirting all over anything that looks suspicious. What do I really need to do to keep stuff from getting screwed up? With what and how often?
     
  2. Y2kAccord

    Y2kAccord Everything happens for reasons I just dont know

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    unload it before you clean it :noes:
     
  3. NISMOTom

    NISMOTom JAFO

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    Okay - I'm going to be VERY general, not specific to a Ruger MkII.

    First off - make sure you clean the weapon AS SOON AS POSSIBLE after firing, this gives any corrosives that may have been in the ammunition less time to harm your weapon. Further - it's easier to clean if it hasn't set.

    MAKE SURE THE WEAPON IS UNLOADED. Verify this using both a visual and a tactile inspection. Remember.... Drop the magazine first, THEN cycle the action.

    Field strip the weapon using the manufacturer's directions. Do NOT go past field stripping unless you are proficient enough to do so. Nothing is as embarassing as carrying a box of parts in to a gunsmith saying "can you help me?" He'll look at you like an idiot for not requesting help in the first place. Also - if it is a duty weapon of some sorts - only armorers should go past a field strip due to liability reasons.

    After field stripping, I prefer to start with the barrel since it is my least favorite part to clean. Use a cleaning rod that has very little flex, and is made of a material softer than the barrel itself. I recommend carbon fiber, or nylon sleeved stainless steel.

    You have two options on how to feed the cleaning rod. You can insert it from the bore and then place the soaked patches or the wire brush on the rod once it is through the chamber... or you can push the patches or wire brush from the chamber end first. The important thing to remember is to feed the cleaning material through in the same manner that a bullet would.

    You can use several different materials to clean your bore. I prefer to use a foaming bore cleaner and let it sit for a while.... use manufacturers directions. Other bore cleaners suitable for routine cleaning are Hoppe's No. 9, Kleen-Bore, Slip2000's #725, among others. Don't use Copper cleaners on a routine basis. VERY few of them are safe enough for routine cleaning, and may cause pitting of the barrel.

    First push (or pull) a soaked patch through the barrel. Allow it to sit for 2 minutes or so. If you are using a foam - push a dry patch through once the foam has cleared so you can see through the barrel. Next use a nylon brush and take 3 passes through the barrel. Push a wet patch (with the bore cleaner of course,) followed by a dry patch. Alternate with wet patches and dry patches until the wet patch emerges without any fouling.

    After the patch emerges without fouling - inspect the bore visually by looking through the chamber side - with the barrel crown pointed at a light source. If you see any fouling on the lands of the rifling, pass through the bore again, this time with a brass brush. Repeat wet and dry alternating until the bore is clean.

    If your weapon requires a separate chamber brush clean the chamber as well - using a bore cleaner or a "carbon cutter." "Gun Scrubber" "Carbon Cutter" and even Brake parts cleaner are sufficient to clean carbon buildup from the chamber area, and locking lugs.

    Make sure to run a final dry patch through the barrel to absorb any extra bore cleaner. Follow this dry patch with a lubricant to protect the barrel from humidity, etc. I personally use CLP, Militec, or Slip2000 for this. Only use a LIGHT coat, and pass a dry patch through the barrel after this. You only need a light coat.

    Next, you should focus on the frame. I soak a bristle brush in carbon cutter or even bore cleaner and scrub away at the entire frame area, the trigger assemblies, etc. Make sure you dry the cleaning solution thoroughly and apply lubricant to the manufacturer's specifications.

    Next up is the slide assembly on a pistol. You should scrub this using a carbon cutter, paying special attention to get any crud out of the extractor and ejector areas. You should also take special care to keep the firing pin or striker as clear of cleaning solvents as possible. It is almost impossible on most weapons to thoroughly dry this, and it will then attract dirt and dust, crudding up the channel and possibly causing a failure. If you want to clean the channel - use compressed air.

    Sometimes on the breechface I will scrub away with a brass brush to clean up any hard to get fouling, following by a nylon brush and bore cleaner to remove the brass residue left by the brush.

    Thorougly dry the cleaner from the slide assembly and lubricate to manufacturers spec.

    Next - reassemble your weapon, and perform a functions check.


    Other things to remember:

    Magazines are integral to your weapons function. Clean your magazine bodies after every 3-4 range sessions.

    The above instructions are GENERAL in nature. Some weapons systems (AR15, Glock, 1911) will have certain parts requiring cleaning not covered above. Typically these weapons systems will ship with instructions on how to clean their specific parts.

    If you have specific questions - feel free to post them here, or pose them to the few members with a clue on this board. You can also browse forums specific to your weapon platform or larger boards such as www.thefiringline.com or www.thehighroad.org for extra hints and tips.

    Hope this was of help. Shoot safe.
     
  4. joo

    joo New Member

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    ^^ good how to
     
  5. Bigsnake

    Bigsnake OT Supporter

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    I have a 22/45 and it's the same gun pretty much.

    For cleaning I have a small cleaning rod made for handguns. Also have a jag for a .22lr for pushing patches through and a brush for .22lr.

    I'll run the patches in from the breach area to the muzzle. When I start out I'll run a couple wet patches through, then run the brush through a couple time wet, and then run another wet patch through and then some dry patches. I keep repeating this whole process until the patches come out clean. The breech area and the area the bolt slides will get pretty fouled up with power residue so you'll need to spend some time on there. Same with the bolt. It'll get a good bit of build up on it.

    This gun isn't that hard to clean and I shoot non jacketed bullets though mine so you don't have to worry about copper build-up. Mine also doesn't seem to have a problem with lead build up either.
     
  6. huntz0r

    huntz0r New Member

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    Well it sounds like I don't have the right stuff to clean with. This is what they sold me at the gun shop:

    [​IMG]

    Seems like I need some kind of flexible device to clean from the breech side rather than this rod type thingy (which I was following the instructions in the kit, soak the wire brush and shove it down the barrel from the muzzle end and back out, repeat, switch with soaked patches, repeat).

    This all sounds like a lot of work too... 2 hours of cleaning after 150 rounds of shooting :o I thought you don't really need to break it down fully except every once in a while, just clean out the more obvious bits.

    My gun is a complete bitch to field strip too :(
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2005
  7. ryanbum

    ryanbum Its the one that says Bad Mother Fucker on it

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    over lubing = gummed up crap and slippery gun. Your firearm requires very light lubrication with a high quality oil like Miltec.
     
  8. Anders 7

    Anders 7 I aim to misbehave OT Supporter

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    Some people on here are a little too anal about cleaning their guns. They don't need immediate cleaning after each time fired. It's not a bad idea but a quality gun was made to take some "abuse".
     
  9. Bigsnake

    Bigsnake OT Supporter

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    You can remove the bolt and clean with a rod through the breach that way.

    My 22/45 uses the same instructions for a Mark II to field strip. It's easy after you've done it a few times.

    I often just clean the bolt, reciever and lubricate it a little when it starts to get sticky. Periodically I'll clean the barrel out after I know it's been awhile.
     
  10. Dangerousmind

    Dangerousmind bad-ass amnesiac

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    I've been tying patches onto a piece of string and pulling it from the barrel side to clean from the breach. That seems to work quite well, and is low cost compared to all the other things you can buy. Plus it fits any bore size. I do eventually want to get a bore snake for each cal. I own though.

    How many rounds do you all usually put through before you clean everything out?
     
  11. spankaveli

    spankaveli OT Supporter

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    holy thread revival batman
     
  12. Dangerousmind

    Dangerousmind bad-ass amnesiac

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    I figured it would be better to revive it than start a new one to ask my question.
     
  13. Keesh

    Keesh New Member

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    Boresnakes are cheap and are so much easier than anything else. I put anywhere from 500-1000 before I clean my 22/45. It doesn't take me more than a few minutes, I usually just wipe the bolt and the receiver down. I've broken the bolt down a few times and cleaned everything but it's not really that necessary.
     
  14. purebad

    purebad I don't need your approval, right?

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    Its the cool thing to do these days..
     
  15. BigBadJohn

    BigBadJohn Pay-back time OT Supporter

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    I clean my guns after each use. Even if I fired one single round, I still clean it.
    I also wipe them down with a rag with a light oil on it after Ive been handling them. Even if its for a brief moment
     
  16. jehan60188

    jehan60188 New Member

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    fwih, "old" bullets (or maybe blackpowder...) used to have a powder that was corrosive, so people are (still) in the mindset to clean, clean, clean.
    You have to consider though- if the Colt SAA "won the west" in as adverse conditions as likely were around, then cleaning a /good/ gun isn't necessary after shooting it once...

    That being said, nothing ends a day at the range better than putting on a nice, big cup of tea (or brandy), and sitting at my desk cleaning my guns...

    Also, while we're on the subject, should I not pull my cleaning patches back through when I clean a barrel? So, no back and forth motion through the barrel, and just go "the way the bullet goes"?
    Also, do I /have/ to get 9mm patches, or can I just trim the 12 ga patches I have?
     
  17. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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    I would disagree
     
  18. jehan60188

    jehan60188 New Member

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    disagree with the fact that old powder technology was corrosive, or the fact that one may use the example of the SAA as one reason to justify not cleaning a gun after shooting it once, or that new powder technology is not corrosive?

    You're probably more right than I am on any of those points; for the sake of abating my ignorance, please expound on your opinion.
     
  19. purebad

    purebad I don't need your approval, right?

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    OCD on the guns? :)
     
  20. bpa00

    bpa00 New Member

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    I clean and lube my "easy" guns, such as my glock after every use... Other guns I have that are more of a pain to clean/lube, I usually clean every few hundred rounds...

    As to the original (old) post... "poured" and "squirting all over" are not terms that are generally positive when talking about gun maintenance...
     
  21. BigBadJohn

    BigBadJohn Pay-back time OT Supporter

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    I simply look for any sort of signs of wear and lightly drop or wipe oil on the area
     
  22. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    The important thing is you know how to clean your gun. We can debate after how much use you need to clean your gun but the truth is many people do not clean their guns because they do not know how.

    First step know how your gun works and how to clean it properly.

    Regarding the other thing I clean my guns regularly. If nothing else it gives me a chance to spot problems and replace parts. As a competition shooter equipment malfuntions are really expensive. Having a reasonably clean gun eliminates a whole bunch of factors. I say reasonably as I also believe my guns are more accurate when they have some fouling. I typically clean the gun one match before a big match then do not clean it again until after the big match.
     
  23. Bacardi 151

    Bacardi 151 New Member

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    If one is using corrosive ammo, such as surplus ammo, you do want to clean it after each use or you risk damage. It doesn't have to be a heavy clean but you at least want to clean the barrel.
     

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