A&P Saving Images for Printing

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by nozoki, Jul 16, 2006.

  1. nozoki

    nozoki Hail to the king, baby.

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    How do you guys save your images to have them printed at large sizes? I'm interested in what format you save as and what resolutions and color schemes. Basically I'd like to know your steps from first opening a pic in photoshop to saving it for printing. Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    I keep a folder for the original file untouched. Copy those images to another folder for post processing. I keep a few as .psd files for the ones I know I'll probably print or tweak further at a later date. Then I have another folder for all the post processed images resized for web use. I use the high res images (jpg) for prints since these are only 3-4mb files. My psd files are usually 17-20 mb.
     
  3. jTranz

    jTranz Lost in Translation

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    :cool: i do the same thing with my folder / work structure

    this tool who shot one of the girls i shot, sent her a dvd comprised of 3.61 GB's of images. turns out there were 10 pix on the dvd each being about 350-400mbs... :rofl: :hsugh: :greddy:
     
  4. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    no way she can upload those pics to her myspace page haha
     
  5. nozoki

    nozoki Hail to the king, baby.

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    Do I need to resample an image to a certain resolution? My images always seem to be set at 72 ppi in photoshop when I first open them. So let's say I open a new pic and the image size says

    [​IMG]

    If I set the resolution to 267ppi without resampling I get a smaller print size but the same amount of pixels

    [​IMG]

    Or I can resample it to get more pixels I get a bigger print size but I'm afraid it will lose sharpness.

    [​IMG]

    Or does this even matter. Is it just for on-screen imaging and not affecting actual printing resolution? Thanks for the help guys.
     
  6. CRC

    CRC New Member

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    from what ive heard and seen, the dpi doesnt matter. as long as all the pixels are there, the printers do the rest :dunno:
     
  7. nozoki

    nozoki Hail to the king, baby.

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    thanks for the info
     
  8. MojoDojo

    MojoDojo New Member

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    I would argue that DPI does matter.

    DPI = Dots Per Inch, this is what will be printed and the higher the number of dots the better with 300 dpi being the norm that I print at.

    Examples
    4" x 6" @ 300dpi = good sharp detail for a continous tone image and acceptable quality for vector or sharp edges like that found in text
    4" x 6" @ 72dpi = loss of detail for a continous tone image, absolute crap for vector or sharp edges like that found in text

    Opposite to this idea is for instance printing large billboards or large posters. You could get away with a lower DPI as your not actually focusing on a very tiny area up close.

    You can always lower resolution but you can't add resolution to an image after the fact. As in you can't go from a 2"x2" web image at 72dpi and hope to print a 8"x8" 300dpi image without it looking like crap. Vector or resolution independent images are excluded from this problem.

    JPG image compression is the most widely accepted print format at the 1hour quicky locations (Walmart, Target, CostCo) but you don't want to save to this format multiple times. Each time a JPG is saved it throws away valuable image data, you can lessen the data loss by choosing the HIGHEST QUALITY setting when saving. This will make for a large image file, just so you are aware. When you doing any sort of image editting you will want to save it in a format such as PSD or TIF and the final version as a JPG if you must. Some higher-end photo printers will accept PSD or TIF as well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2006
  9. nozoki

    nozoki Hail to the king, baby.

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    Thanks Mojo!
     
  10. 00soul

    00soul halfsharkalligatorhalfman

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    in for later
     
  11. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    resmpling is adding in new pixels, don't do that unless you have to. just change the dpi to what you need to get the print size you want.

    if you have to blow it up bigger than available, send it to someplace with a better interpolation tool than photoshop. if you have to do it yourself, do it in small amounts, say adding 10% each time
     

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