ruby on rails. plone. should I be considering learning these for my project?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by piratepenguin, Feb 11, 2008.

  1. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    This shit is like nothing I have ever looked at before. I know PHP, but I was thinking more like using Python or Perl for this project I'm working on, learning them in the process.

    It's a website, basically, that needs to interact with a lot of web services (via XML RPC I think, it's so simple).

    It's actually not all that complicated, the website, but I was looking at ruby on rails, and I used to be interested in learning Plone, but I can't figure out if it will be useful for anything I have in mind. I'm used to programming the old school way - simple text editor, get a proper structure with #includes or what have ya, compile it or visit it in your browser.

    What is the advantage of learning this next-gen RoR or Plone stuff? It's not even the language that gets me, it's the method.

    I figure, the world seems to want this shit so I should learn it, but it's so fucking different and I don't get the point really, so maybe the worlds being stupid again, or someone run me through it, please.
     
  2. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    I'm not familiar with Plone, but I use Ruby/Rails all the time for client projects and I have been very happy with it so far. It really encourages dev to be better programmers. The MVC paradigm along with ORM (ActiveRecord) and everything else is about as modern as you can get.
     
  3. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    If you already know perl, I'd take a look at Catalyst. It is similar to Rails, but as it is perl there are a million ways to do anything so its less committed - you can use any M/V/C easily, any ORM you want. Most people use Template Toolkit and DBIx::Class, and I've had a great deal of success with it.

    Johnathon Rockway also has a new book out about it, which is really helpful, and the guys in #catalyst and #dbix-class on irc.perl.org are always really helpful.

    http://catalyst.perl.org/

    But to answer your question: Rails or Zope/Plone would be good things to know, yes.
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Ruby and Rails are just the latest "fad". Don't worry, it will blow over, soon.

    If you want something to learn (and don't already know it) there is a huge market (and will continue to be a market) for ASP.Net.
     
  5. whup

    whup I wish you had children and.. so that I could step

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    I'm using Castle Project with .NET. It's the hotness.

    MonoRail (no relation to Mono, though you can run it on Mono) = MVC
    ActiveRecord = ORM (on top of NHibernate)
    Windsor = IoC / DI

    Highly recommended.

    Alternatively, find corresponding libs/frameworks for PHP and use those.

    Zend framework has an MVC
    Not sure about ActiveRecord pattern implementations (if Zend has one or not. There's bound to be lots)
    Same with IoC / DI libs.

    So perhaps stick with PHP. The improtant stuff to be learned is language agnostic and can be applied to nigh on all the languages.

    RoR has always seemed very fadish to me. Just very well marketed, and with a big bandwagon. I've always looked at it as the Visual Basic of the web, if that's a bit harsh or inaccurate.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    Here's the thing. I'm writing 3 things for this project. 2 are daemons and one is a web-based front-end.

    Also, they should be very cross platform (there's one of the daemons which I will want to be usable on mobile phones, set-top boxes, as well as obscure operating systems (such as Haiku, which is a BeOS clone)). Maybe I should be looking at Java?

    But would Python be just as useful? The reason I'm mentioning Python over Perl is because a similar project to what I'm doing is written in Python using mod_python. Plus Google use Python, so how bad can it be. What kind of framework would Google be using, I wonder.

    Would ruby and rails be very useful for writing daemons (like a web-service) as it is for writing websites?
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    python is really ugly and frustrating. Google uses it because I have no fucking clue why. I will do many things to avoid ever having to use it again. I got my share working with ensim -- and never again, let me tell you.

    ruby/rails is a fad. It is not a viable language for any large project.
     
  8. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    I've been beginning to learn mod_python, and some python basics, and I've been liking it a lot.

    I'm going to begin a proof of concept release using this language I think, and I'll be telling ye when that's done, and I'll take further advice about structure and language choice.

    Danke, all! It's been informative, and what some of you are saying about RoR being a "fad" seems quite credible. Although, I will always be interested in learning different languages which will help me build web-apps in particular, and I will obviously be becoming more and more interested in productivity and such as my work becomes more serious. But right now, I think I can begin to write with Python, even if I will abandon it in 2 months time, it can't do much harm to learn it.
     

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