1. I work in small office (2 people) I use alot of different scanners for documents and pictures and other such nonsense. Well between the 4 scanners it's got my Business spec dell (pent IV, 1gig ram, XP home) just about maxxed out, (it lags on even simple functions.)

    So I i noticed that we had an extra PC (same specs as above) laying in the storage room a day or two ago. I asked about it and was told i could use it. I bought a small KVM switch so that I can use my single monitor, mouse, and keyboard. so far so good!

    We are on a wired connection and the router is way in the back and all the wires are run through the ceiling. I want both of the PC's to be able to be on the office network so I can share all my files. There is only one network cable coming out of my wall.....

    What to do. I have an old netgear wired router at my house, can i use that? I want it to just repeat the signal I guess? How do i go about setting this up?
     
  2. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    I would try to find a cheap switch or something like that. You can also just simply run another wire from the router closet to this PC (easiest method).

    If you wish to use the router you should know the implications of having to NAT twice. If there are other PC's on the network they will not be able to reach you or the other computer unless you initiate the connection (so the router has a NAT entry for that connection).

    I do not suggest using another router since you do not seem to be very familar with the problems that could arise out of it. I think you should just simply run another cable or just buy a small 4 port netgear switch or something of the sort. (DO NOT USE A HUB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
     
  3. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    He can use a hub without any problems. In fact, a hub may be faster.... A switch will have switching overhead... And since traffic is going to be from either machine over the existing cable, a switch will not help him, anyway. 3 nodes will not benefit from a switch because at least 2 nodes are needed, and the 3rd would have nothing left to "talk" to.

    So actually, a good hub would outperform a good switch in this situation.

    However, I think his budget allows for neither.... And I'd probably recommend a cheap switch, which is "good enough for government work".

    Furthermore the netgear router wouldd work and he would not have to NAT twice. He could very easily disable the DHCP server, and use the router's built-in 4-port switch as just that -- a switch!
     
  4. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    Can I quote you on this.... I have to say this is probably the funniest thing I have ever heard someone who thinks they know what they are talking about say.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    A GOOD hub, will definitely not be slower than a switch when you have 3 machines, with most traffic occuring between the server and the machines, and not machine-to-machine.

    As soon as you add a fourth, it could change, but in this scenario it is NOT prudent to disallow a hub.
     
  6. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    sorry -- got sidetracked from the previous comments by P07r0457 -- despite his idiotic comments about hubs he did bring up one valid point which is to uplink the "router" to the other switch and then plug your PC's into the router and disable DHCP on the router.
     
  7. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    do you not know how HUBS work? so 100/half at best is better then 100/full. broadcasting every packet you send is better then directing the packets only to the port they need to go? Not to mention the implications on the rest of the network when you add a hub into a switched environment. You do realize that it is fairly easy to cause an STP loop when introducing a hub.. especially if you are careless.
     
  8. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    You are a fucking moron. I said a GOOD hub. I understand you're probably some 12 year old kid who thinks Linksys=Cisco, but I'm not talking about that, at all. A GOOD hub will give 100 full duplex, no problems. There is no fucking routing loop if you're not a fucktard when you set the damn thing up. You don't broadcast every packet, a hub simply sends it to each node... Which is TWO nodes because ONE is sending the packet. As a result, ONE node receives a packet it didn't "need" but it doesn't fucking matter because that node would be UNABLE to send on a switch because the node it would be talking to is receiving the packet being sent by the original node! The packet, once it travels on the node to the MDF, is now entering a switched environment, and assuming even cheap Layer-2 switches, will only travel to it's destination thanks to the layer-2 switching being done at that level.

    IN THIS PARTICULAR SCENARIO (and I am specific to apply that condition) a hub will be at least as efficient as the switch -- and due to switching overhead, the hub could eek out as being more efficient.







    NONE of this makes a hum send a packet as "broadcast" if it was not sent that way. And even if you utilize switches, a broadcast is still a broadcast, and a switch WILL still send it to all nodes.
     
  9. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Jolly's right... and I feel dirty for saying it. Even a single server environment doesn't really need a switch since it will max out the pipeline to and from the server anyway. Get into load balancing or at least multiple servers, and switches become waaaay better.
     
  10. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    first off linksys=crap and != cisco by any means.

    secondly I fairly sure I know more about networking then you do. I do have a masters degree and I am a dual Cisco CCIE (Security and R&S) working on voice now.

    I have never found a single hub that would outperform any single switch. You also give the end users too much credit for setting the hub up. Just two years ago I was contracted out to the United State Dept of Labor to redesign their BGP environment. While I was there, an end user decided to try to do exactly what this guy did and plugged his hub into the network twice and due to a very common misconfiguration (not shutting down ports where bpdu's are recieved from trunks not participating in STP) the loop caused the core switches (6509's w/ SUP720) to crash. This exact scenario happens a lot often then not.

    There is also no such thing as a real HUB that supports full duplex. You are talking about switching hubs which are not really hubs in the true sense of the word hub. A true hub only allows one station to send at any given time and you will find quite a lot of collisions. I really want you to show me some real world proof of a hub working better then a switch in a business scenario.
     
  11. So if I just plug the cable into my router run all the appropriate lines to each of the PC's and disable the DHCP it will just work? What other things do i need to change?

    To be honest we don't really sahre that many files on the office network. I just use it when my PC bogs down to throw files on so i can work from another PC. (If any one is wondering, I scan in sports slides from the 1920's-1970's. I Use a superscan and it can scan up to 500 slides while in repeat mode.) If i load it up with slides it can take up to 4 hours to fully scan all the slides @ 350DPI.

    Just having the ability to share between my two PCs at my desk is what i'm looking to be able to do.
     
  12. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    just ensure you uplink the router/switch in the closet to the LAN port of the router not the WAN port. Then disable dhcp on the lan ports and plug your other two PC's into the LAN ports. If your router's built in switch does not support auto MDIX then you will need a crossover cable (simply cut the end and recrimp it or buy a crossover adapter for it (like $0.50 from graybar or the like)
     
  13. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    We have demonstrated that you do NOT know more about networking. And certifications have NEVER meant jack shit.

    You are a fucking moron. This is for several reasons. However, I will address only one... It is PHYSICALLY IMPOSSIBLE to do this in this users scenario. The REASON he is even having this problem is that he has TWO machines and only ONE patch cable to the MDF. As a result, If he were to buy a hub there is NO PHYSICAL WAY to connect TWO patch cables to the MDF. If he could, then he wouldn't have this problem in the first place -- he could simply plug a discrete drop into each machine.e

    Um, no. A switching hub will allow multiple nodes of mixed speeds to communicate, and allow 100Mbps nodes to sync at 100Mbps with clients on the hub that are running at only 10Mbps. Realistically, this is created by having really two hubs, and each port can be switched onto either one. If all clients are 100Mbps Full Duplex, then the switching function will be dormant.

    I think you need to show some real world proof. I have explained my reasoning and it is logical. Yours, however, is not. That being said, if I have time, I will do a demonstration. However, not likely to happen.
     
  14. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    This has me very concerned. With all the "experience" you claim to have, it's certainly not prudent to recommend a crossover "adapter".
     
  15. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    i'll reply to your comments after lunch, in the meantime please find me a link to a full duplex hub and then find me online documentation on full duplex hubs.

    hub = repeater
    switch = bridge

    in the truest sense of the device in question find me different. I would love to be proved wrong. Please provide me links and articles that will prove me 100% wrong. I will just about guarantee you that any full duplex "hub" you find is actually a switch.
     
  16. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    The guy obviously can't run a new cable or that is what he would have done. If the device in question is not auto MDIX it is not going to have an uplink to the switch/router in the closet. If this is the case how do you best suggest the user fix this? I doubt cutting, crossing over, and recrimping will be of interest to the user -- if he could do that he would just simply run another cable.

    thus really the only other alternative would be something like this:

    [​IMG]
     
  17. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    No, I think you should simply pick up some textbooks and actually learn what you're talking about.

    and in this particular scenario, there is nothing wrong with it being a "multi-port" repeater. Depending on certain conditions, it is possible the overhead of switching could decrease performance. In reality, it won't be noticeable or matter.... The point I have been making this entire time (while you have been scrambling for excuses) is that a hub is a perfectly acceptable solution for this user. If he has one laying around, there is no sense in paying for something else.

    I have already proved you wrong. You're just a douche for not conceeding the point that you were incorrect. A hub is perfectly acceptable for this user.
     
  18. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    no you have not, and this has not been about if a hub would work for this user for quite some time now. It is simply about what you think a hub is vs what a hub actually is.

    I am tired of arguing such a stupid point with you, but I am certainly not going to admit being wrong until you show proof. I have looked on google and other places for about 20 minutes and could not find a single full duplex hub that after reading the specs was a real hub in the truest sense of the word.

    Companies can call products whatever they want.. I can create a switch and call it a hub all I want but it does not make it a true hub.
     
  19. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    :rofl: you're a hoot.
     
  20. Kewlb

    Kewlb New Member

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    no I am bored and stuck in a 1-month contract where I do nothing all day. I have nothing to do but try to argue on the internet to pass time. :o

    I did just start watching the Hero episodes about 2 hours ago, at least its something to do.. very well written show.
     
  21. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    yes and yes
     

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