"Robinsoncove" Home Theater/Bedroom Construction Thread

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by veonake, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    So, I may post this over on AVS forum, but I figured I'd give it a shot here first and see if you guys are interested.

    Since I transferred schools I've been living at my parents place, and been staying in the old master bedroom. Before the details, I basically decided I wanted to remodel the room since it is from the 60's, and once I got started I decided to turn it into a hybrid bedroom/theater. There's a lot of progress already made, so this first post will start from demolition to the present state, and I'll make updates as they happen. On to the details.

    The room started about 16x20. On the short wall there was a medium-sized full-bath and a tiny office area that shared a wall with the bathroom. This left about 12x16 for the bedroom area. I decided to completely knock out both the original bathroom and office area, and create a smaller (~6x8) bathroom in one corner. This allows for a 10x8 alcove along with the main space of 12x16.

    Ok, the fun stuff. I went a little crazy and decided I wanted a double-stud wall with double-insulation, one layer of soundboard, and resilient channeling. In theory, this should lead to an STC (sound transmission class) of ~60, which is defined as "Superior soundproofing; most sounds inaudible". Now, I'm sure mine isn't that good, but it's pretty damn good.

    Equipment:
    Screen: DIY 96" fixed-frame w/blackout cloth
    Projector: Optoma HD70
    Source: NAD T534 DVD Player
    Amp: NAD C352 Integrated Amplifier
    Front Stage: NHT SB3
    Sub: NHT SW10ii

    For now I'm not going to run a rear stage. To be honest I don't watch enough movies that utilize a rear stage for it to matter enough, and I've never been left unsatisfied by my setup thus far.

    Ok, the reason people actually read these threads... Pics:

    Early demolition, you can sort of see what the room looked like before (my brother painted the walls black before I moved back home lol). Oh, and I forgot to mention the door opening to one of the hallways was sealed off.
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    Starting the double-wall:
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    New adjustable depth electrical boxes to allow for the layer of soundboard + resilient channel:
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    Here you can see the soundboard up and caulked, plus some of the resilient channel going up:
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    Yay, drywall is going up finally:
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    "Media box". Shows nice fully-jacketed component cable (about 3/4" thick) from canare, plus speaker wire, ethernet, and coax.
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    Speaker outlet on the opposite wall so no cables are seen (equipment rack will be on the wall opposite these speaker cables). There are also 2 RG59 cables here. One is for the subwoofer, and another is for future use. Both are "jumpered" to the media box on the opposite wall:
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    Projector location (about an 11' throw), with component cable run in the orange conduit:
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    All the ceiling drywall is now up and taped except for the projector location because we are waiting for the mount to arrive. I'll update later with those pictures. Let me know any comments/suggestions/questions you have.
     
  2. aonghus

    aonghus bsmf

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    pretty sexy.....
     
  3. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    nice dude

    PS no STC 80 no care
     
  4. ngsm13

    ngsm13 New Member

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    w00ts.
     
  5. JRock10

    JRock10 Active Member

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  6. Dodge guy

    Dodge guy OT Supporter

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  7. David02

    David02 Guest

    Nice work man! I wish I had the confidence to try a project like that! :bigthumb:
     
  8. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Thanks. It took over a year with help from my dad and a couple friends on weekends to finish it completely, meaning all trim, paint, bathroom, wiring, etc. My dad has been doing home improvement (on our homes, not professionally) since before I was born, so I've just learned from him and the rest we just figure out as we go, which really isn't too tough. It's fun to tackle if you have the patience.

    Just as an update, it was painted a cool gray with white trim, and real cherrywood floors. The bathroom turned out pretty nice too, except I regret installing a shower pan instead of tiling all the way.

    As far as sound insulation is concerned, it NEARLY met my expectations. I can blast music and you'll never know anything is playing at all in the room that is 3 feet from the wall (not the side my room with a door, but the other room has a door facing my wall) UNLESS there is heavy bass. Bass is the killer unfortunately, and I knew this would happen. I think bass traps may alleviate this issue. Also, although I have a solid door I don't have a sealing strip along the floor, so that's really the weakest link currently.

    My dad and I really did all the work ourselves with the exception of installing the glass doors on the shower, obviously something we couldn't do. So labor was basically $0. I don't remember exactly how much the materials cost, but it was fairly reasonable.. lumber only ran I think around $200, soundboard ~$300, drywall... can't remember now. Resilient channel was ~$100-150 IIRC and insulation was probably $200. Point being, you can make your room nearly soundproof for ~$1000 if you know how to do some construction.

    I'll try to get updated pictures and post them.
     
  9. ECD

    ECD New Member

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    nice, post the updated pictures.

    i'm been trying to do the same thing to an area in my basement that is unfinished. did you use the green acoustic insulation for the roof?
     
  10. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    I'm not home, but I'm going to try to either have someone else take them or take them myself over the thanksgiving break. I used the same brand insulation as is in the walls (don't remember the brand, but you can see the initials are JM and it's thermal and acoustic insulation), except it's extra thick, I can't remember the R rating off the top of my head. It is meant for ceilings though.

    Since you are doing the basement, your main issue is going to be passing bass into the rest of the house through the ceiling of course. I recommend going to avsforum.com and looking around their construction threads for people that did heavy sound isolation in their basements. They usually suspend the ceiling drywall/sound deadening boards using metal channeling similar to mine but is a bit sturdier and is isolated by rubber standoffs.
     
  11. ( * )( * )

    ( * )( * ) OT Supporter

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  12. CrazyInteg

    CrazyInteg Honda-Acura.net OG

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    so if the bed is still in there, where do you sit? I bet you would never awake to any noises in your bedroom!

    Why regret the shower pan?
     
  13. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Good question. It's somewhat complicated, partially due to the fact that I have not yet hung my screen due to my projector being stolen during a home robbery :)rant:) and lacking motivation to hang it. Anyway, currently the bed is against the wall where the screen will be. The screen will be hung using a french cleat or something similar above the bed. I did some measurements, and this will only be less than a foot higher than where my old screen was hung and I don't think it should present any real eye-strain (it's a 90" screen anyways). I have two theater chairs that are about 4 feet from the foot of the bed facing that wall and two other chairs can fit easily on the side and still have optimum viewing. More chairs can be added with a less optimum viewing angle, but still more than satisfactory.

    I have my speakers all wired up and so have been playing music plenty, and the listening angles work well. The speakers are on stands on either side of the bed, and the subwoofer is in an opposite corner, mostly out of view. Hmm, I really need to get pictures, kinda hard while living 3000 miles away.

    Any other questions?
     
  14. CrazyInteg

    CrazyInteg Honda-Acura.net OG

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    Yeah why do you regret doing the shower pan? Why would you rather have tile on the floor?
     
  15. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Oops, got caught up in your first question.

    Once I get pictures it will be more obvious why, but basically because everything in the bathroom looks pretty cohesive, but the shower pan just looks kind of cheap when it is surrounded by lots of tile and a nice glass swinging door. Making a custom pan using tile would not be very easy, but it's definitely doable even as a DIY, but we already bought the shower pan before deciding on tile and no way to return it. Basically, the entire room was pretty much done "to the max", with the exception of the shower pan haha. Not that everything was very expensive (it wasn't), it was just done "right". Looking back, a shower pan is just an "easy" way to have floor in your shower, but is actually more expensive than tile and doesn't look as good (if you do it yourself, otherwise it is cheaper). Oh well.
     
  16. CrazyInteg

    CrazyInteg Honda-Acura.net OG

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    Great! I would love to see the pictures. I'm still in the dream phase, but I have found a guy that can do tile pretty cheap. I figured I would keep the old shower pan and get new tiles on the walls and bathroom floor. So I'm interested to see yours.

    I like this one.
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