Road Test - Ford Falcon FPV GT/GT-P

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Ford is back with a vengeance. It doesn't matter where your loyalties lie - the facts speak for themselves.

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    Just a few years ago, Ford Australia wasn't exactly wowing the Joe Public with its volume selling family car, the AU Falcon, and it's V8 Supercar entrants were being punished by an impeccable Mark Skaife and the well-drilled Holden Racing Team.

    2003, however, has ushered in a new era for the Ford operation in Australia.

    Sales of Ford's new BA Falcon are up, it's new AWD wagon is almost ready, the Blue Oval has just launched it's flagship sportscar brand [FPV] in direct answer to HSV's dominance of the performance car market, and Ford is now consistently winning races in Australia's premier racing category, the V8 Supercars.

    This is an intriguing situation and begs the question: What was the catalyst for such a turnaround? In my humble opinion, the new BA Falcon. Plain and simple. It's an Australian car with a level of refinement and technology that belies it's humble origins and the benefits of the new car can be seen just as clearly on the racetrack as on the road.

    Perhaps the superceded and much-maligned AU Falcon's styling to too radical and that was its downfall a few years back, or maybe the VX Commodore was just a better vehicle?

    Whatever the case, the Falcon is back, and herein we'll take a look at the big chiefs - the flagship Falcons in the new 2003 BA range if you will - the GT-P and GT.

    Drive

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    Ford Performance Vehicles, or FPV, has unleashed what is a seriously focussed sportscar of historic proportions. One of the things I had trouble with accepting after getting to grips with the way the car drives, was just how good FPV's premium muscle car is. I'll be honest - I was expecting a fast car, but not with the levels of refinement found within.

    HSV has been tuning humble Commodores for nigh-on 30 years, then in comes this upstart FPV group and in its first year has unleashed a fire-breathing, giant-killing, take-no-prisoners, wob-wobbing V8 that pulls 0-100km/h sprints in under 6.0 seconds -- yet still has four cup holders, enough room for the entire family and wads of bootspace. E-gads!

    And while price doesn't often come into play when we're on test, you'd be hard pressed to get this sort of quad-cam V8 performance for such a bargain price. $70,000 may sound like a lot for the GT-P, and $60,000 for the GT ain't piecemeal either, but when the 300kW HSV GTS coupe and sedan fetch almost six figures, it's hard not to be impressed by the value on offer.

    In fact, there are no other quad-cam V8s in the world offered at this price (at the time of writing). Jaguar's got quad camshafts in a number of its sporty models, but it's also got that ultra-premium 'image' thing going on, which means you'll be paying more than double the cost of one of these local lads, and getting perhaps two-thirds of the 5.4-litre capacity.

    From the get go, it's evident that FPV has done it's homework. Despite a killer kerb weight of roughly 1.8 tonnes, the suspension setup is perfect - these cars can really be thrown around.

    While the GT-P is a well sorted performance car that turns heads quicker than Danni Minogue wearing a pair of freshly dry-cleaned hot-pants, it's also a practical vehicle, one that loses few of the basic Falcon's sensible features.

    But let's face it - most drivers will be handing over between 60 and 70,000 bones for one thing: the Boss 290 engine. And rightly so, because after hammering the GT-P all over the shop, it's evident that Ford is on to something here: It's a little scary to think what's going to be on offer from the FPV laboratory in the next few years if this is their first effort...

    From the moment you press the glowing ignition button [a la V8 Supercars], you'll be instantly aware that this isn't your average Falcon. Cruise down the driveway - carefully mind, so as not to scrape the front spoiler - turn onto the road and ever-so-gently flex your right foot.

    Power delivery is nice and linear with really good control via the electronic throttle, but it starts off feeling somewhat limp in the automatic: Blame that on a combination of the torque converter and the car's heavy weight.

    At about 2000rpm the small black V8 mill starts to hit its stride and emits a lovely warble, and turns downright angry by 3500rpm, providing serious push and a much crisper note. Heaven on Earth? It could be... but one thing's for sure - if God were an Aussie bloke, he'd drive one.

    By the time you hit peak torque @ 4500rpm, you'll be grinning from ear to ear as the engine is now sucking in copious amounts of air, though the induction noise that is always present is now drowned out by a rising crescendo of eight fat cylinders pumping in perfect harmony, as the engine speed approaches it's 5800rpm redline.

    If you decide to frequent such lofty revolutions, you'll be pleasantly, but firmly pressed into the lavish leather bucket seats, and turning the stereo down to listen the engine's amazing resonance is a must.

    Two-hundred and ninety kilowatts at the fly-wheel is the number, and in real-world terms it feels about right in the auto, and the manual feels like a real 300kW+ weapon. We drove the GT-P in automatic guise for a week and then hopped in the lower-spec GT (with the same 290 Boss engine) sporting a manual shift for another five days and, it has to be said, both are flippin' brilliant.

    We'll look at the different gearboxes and the storming engine in more detail on page two in the engine section, but it's safe to say that whichever one you choose, you'll be stoked.

    Both drivelines offer noticable differences, and will suit certain types of drivers better -- granted, picking the GT stripe colours or wondering whether you need personalised plates are both considerable decisions, but the toughest part will be deciding which category you fit into: Manual or Auto.

    On the road, the two FPV sports sedans respond to driver input with gusto, perhaps too much at times. The traction control comes in very handy in both auto and manual models, allowing you push the performance vehicles without too much fear of retribution from Dr. Physics.

    Both the GT-P and GT track remarkably well round corners, feeling much lighter than their almost-1800kg dry weight would otherwise suggest. Body roll is kept to a bare minimum thanks to a more than competant suspension setup and the 18-inch Dunlop SP Sport 9000 tyres are incredible, gifting the FPVs with a level of grip that belies their hulking size. The steering feel is good, and communication between front wheels and the drivers hands is reassuring. The overall feel of the suspension rig is very good.

    The springs are quite tight which is a necessity in such a sportscar, and you will feel larger bumps and lumps at times, but the rebound and compression damping levels are such that they help soak up many bitumen blemishes, and even with the massive 18-inch wheels and thier miserly 40mm of sidewall, the big cars do a good job in tight urban driving and swift country cruising alike.

    Exterior

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    There are three instantly eye-catching aspects to the GT-P: The alloy wheels, the bonnet bulge and the high-rise rear wing. Together they form the crux of what most will see when you hammer past in the FPV motors, followed by a big Blue Oval badge, but other notable extras include the sculpted side skirts, low front and rear aprons (bumpers) and snazzy fog lights.

    As a whole, the GT-P looks tough, and while the GT has a more revered nameplate, the wheels really killed it for me. The five-spoke alloys of the GT are a little lacking in lustre when compared to the seven spoke mags of the GT-P, which suit the vehicles tough demeanour a lot better.

    Both cars are unique, however. They command attention wherever they go, particularly when you've got plates that read "FPV-GT". I've never seen so many people looking at a car, but it is an iconic Aussie muscle car after all, and this proves better than I could put into words that Ford has delivered a tough, but oh-so-sweet-to-look-at vehicle to rival HSV's tricked-up troupe of V8s.

    Almost all exterior aspects of the FPV sedans have been touched up over the XR8 Falcon, with which they share the intimidating bonnet 'bulge'. One admirer we met in Apollo Bay along the Great Ocean Road mentioned that the lump was more pleasing to him than any scoop or mesh insert from an Evo or a WRX, parting with the words: "Respect the bulge". The front end has a much larger (lower) air-dam, complete with a mesh covering with FPV insignia. Flanking this are two deeply recessed fog lights, with classy bezels not seen in other XR models.

    The side skirts give the car a more ground-hugging profile and help give the wheels a more integrated look, and come complete with faux brake coolers, while the GT/GT-P badging on the sides and the rear is appreciably big and bold.

    The rear wing is large, but not as impractical as you might think. The wing itself is actually quite thin - yet sturdy - so your rearward vision doesn't suffer too much. There's also grey inserts in the both the front spoiler (lower bumper) and the rear bumper, which helps break up the prime colours and adds a modern touch.

    As a whole, both cars look sensational and during a drive from Melbourne to Warrnambool, every time we stopped for a break or for some fuel, people would ask how it goes. "It goes off like a frog in a sock," I'd tell them. But even when motionless, the cars look determined and aggressive and damn - they're big and imposing too.

    The big, flat, low front end is race-car cool, and the rear wing isn't just for drying clothes, and while there is plenty of eye candy on offer, neither car has been overdone to the point of gaudiness.

    Interior

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    Stepping into the red GT-P, I was instantly confronted with what those three letters mean. The 'GT' stands for Grand Tourer - she sure is roomy and comfy - and it is also a throwback to another Ford hey-day when the iconic GT name first entered the Australian domain in 1967 with the XR Falcon GT.

    And the 'P' stands for posh. Or premium, as stepping into the cockpit is an experience unto itself. The leather bucket seats have lovely side bolsters to keep you secure during high-gee cornering and the headrests are much bigger (and better) than those found in the GT.

    Then there's the satellite navigation, dual zone climate control, auto headlights, classy LCD multi-function display, six-stacker CD stereo with seven speakers, a 150W amplifier and tasty rear-mount subwoofer just for good measure.
    While many of these, such as the sat-nav and sub-woofer are cost options, they make driving the GT-P that much more of joy - a complete package if you will - and so come highly recommended.

    Is this GT-P worth an extra 10,000 clams over the GT model though? It all really depends on what means most to you as a driver. Both offer almost identical drives, but if you don't mind spending the extra cash, the premium options are more than worth it.

    There's leather everywhere in both models, with a smattering of suede on seats and in the door inserts, faux carbon fibre (it's the thought that counts), electric everything including fuel filler opener, and who could forget that very special starter button.

    Some hate it, but for mine, it's the dogs bollocks. It reminded me - every time I started the car - that yes, this is something special. It adds a twinge of excitement before you drive off and is far more pleasing than just turning a key.

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    The GT gets slightly different seats to the GT-P: Not quite as plush, but I found them better suited to enthusiastic driving. It also misses out on the 100W stereo, sat-nav, fancy information display centre and climate control, but this by no means relegates its to cheap and nasty -- it is still a very nice place to spend your driving hours.

    Interior space, like all other Falcons, is commendable, and the idea of having such a highly-strung sportscar with enough room to cart around the entire family and lug a great big trailer is a bloody good one.

    While the car's are primarily designed to hard and fast, created to eat up corners like a hungry goldfish slurping down pond scum, they offer remarkably good slow speed control, and your passengers in the back will be more than happy with the plush rear bench. In the rear, there's also a fold-down armrest, which houses two cupholders.

    The steering wheels in both FPV sedans are identical, and have been crafted with solid ergonometrics. They're quite curvy and contoured but are lovely to use, with lots of leather, which is also covering the handbrake lever and auto shifter. The manual stick is a good-looking polished steel Momo job.

    The dials are tastefully finished with FPV decals, light up Ford blue at night and have a 270km/h limit. Like the dials in the XR6 Turbo, you can quickly glance at them and be fully informed as to what the car and the engine are doing. Like the XR6 Turbo, again, there's no redline marker on the bold tachometer and the manual models don't have a gearing guide, which is a little odd.

    All things considered, and the GT has a very comfortable cabin with great front bucket seats and easy to use controls. The GT-P takes things to another level, with more creature comforts than you can shake a stick at, and is a fitting vehicle to sit atop Ford's reinvigorated locally made line-up.

    Comfort and Handling

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    Around town, the automatic transmission wins out. While both transmission types will happily meander in and out of dense traffic and navigate around obstacles at low speeds (the low-end torque is useful here), the auto is just easier. While it's not a hassle with the manual, it's more responsive nature means you'll have to be light on the throttle and quick with the shifts.

    Parallel, reverse and general parking duties can be daunting with the low ride height of the car and wide assortment of bodykit extras, but the turning circle of 11 metres kerb-to-kerb is pretty good for a car of this magnitude and helps reduce the anguish.

    If commuter traffic is a regular part of your driving regime, the automatic gearbox again gets the nod, with its ability to quickly drop gears for overtaking and lane changes. The manual won't protest in heavy traffic, but your left foot will after repeated applications of the fairly well-weighted clutch.

    The driving position in both the FPV GT-P is good, but I found that the GT is better suited to hard driving. While the latter doesn't have the GT-P's taller seats, for me the GT offered a more supportive driving position. That said, there's very little difference between the two, and both have multi-direction electrically adjustable drivers seats.

    The automatic GT-P we drove also had the adjustable foot pedals. While I personally found the factory setting to be fine, the level of adjustment is impressive, and will be a godsend for those who prefer to driver with the seat pushed back or have short limbs.

    Take the time to drive these beasts out of town and their mild-mannered personas fly out the window as the lusty V8 siren song takes over your senses.

    The 5.4-litre V8 engine is a work of art. Sure, it looks good, with numbered FPV build plates, 'Boss 290' badging on the engine cover and the biggest cylinder heads this side of a maritime mill, but it's the crisp sound and physical response of the powerplant that is most pleasing.

    While the GT was quicker, due to the manual transmission, the GT-P was no slouch and the sports shift tip-tronic mode works brilliantly with the V8; it's ability to hold gears even at the rev limiter is commendable, giving you more control when firing out of corners.

    Approaching corners at speed in the GT and GT-P feels a lot better and safer than you would think for such a huge car, and Ford has really done well getting such a reassuring 'feel' to the way the car sits on the road.

    Tickle the brakes (or feather them lightly if you've opted for the rip-snorting Brembo package), set up your line and revel in the way the car grips: The FPV's track wonderfully through even the tightest of corners, and the chassis dynamics are so good that small corrections mid-corner won't upset them. Once you've reached the apex of the corner and can clearly see your exit, it's time to get back on the loud pedal, and both cars respond predictably, with a hint of oversteer if you push a little hard as the the rear hoops step out, only to be persuaded back to the land of adhesion thanks to the non-intrusive (for Australian cars) traction control. The FPVs can hold a much higher corner speed than I anticipated their attitude on the road is very confidence inspiring.

    While there are limits to the vehicle's grip, you'll have the push the über-sticky Dunlop SPs extremely hard to do so. To be honest, I was surprised at how focussed and planted the car felt around corners - the word 'racecar' springs to mind here.

    The FPV engineers have done stellar job tweaking the suspension, with both front and rear ends getting stiffer spring rates, retuned dampers and improved anti-roll bars. There is mild bodyroll during high-gee cornering, but the lardy cars keep most of the weight transfer under control, and you'd be surprised at how quickly and effortlessly these big brutes change direction at speed.

    Turn the traction control off and you'll have to have your wits about you, because the way the cars put their power down is frightening. The auto is very much the softer sibling and will suit drivers who like to go fast, but who don't like getting all crossed up with over-ambitious throttle prodding.

    With traction control turned off in the five-speed manual however, second gear fishtails are common, such is the sheer grunt available under your right foot. But even when things go a little pear shaped, the brilliant chassis dynamics will talk you through the whole thing in slow motion, allowing you to calmly re-correct and slot back into line.

    In manual form, the GT will go from 0-100km/h in about 5.8 seconds in good conditions and though we didn't get to test it on the quarter mile, word on street suggests a sub 14 second pass. We timed the 80-120km/h roll in just under 4.0 seconds in the auto, which indicates how powerful and flexible the powerplant is when cruising.

    Deceleration was gob-smacking (literally) in the GT-P, equipped with dinner-plate sized disc brakes of Italian origin. Up front, the GT-P makes use of 355mm cross-drilled, pillar vented discs, clamped with Brembo four-pot calipers that bite harder than a pit-bull at dinner time.

    At the rear are 330mm ventilated, cross-drilled discs again shod with four piston calipers, and to top it all off, you get stainless steel brake lines, and the now-obligatory EBD and ABS systems. The GT gets the 'standard' brake package, though the discs are too big to fit in anything less than a 17-inch wheel.

    They're not as fade-free and instantly arresting as the stoppers on the GT-P, but they still do a good job: Up front are 325mm grooved discs with twin piston calipers, while at the rear a large single piston caliper works on 303mm discs, supploed by PBR.

    As far as vehicle handling goes, the way the two FPV sedans behave is at odds with their sheer size and weight - they are serious drivers cars with serious potential. If you want the ultimate V8 sports tourer, you'd be hard pressed to find an Australian car that performs as well as this - and at this price.

    Engine

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    The Boss 290 engine is special for a number of reasons. To start with, it's the only quad-cam small block V8 engine in Australia for under $100 large. Secondly, it's arguably the most powerful Australian-built V8 on offer. It may be trailing the expensive Callaway-tuned 300kW 5.7-litre mill of the HSV GTS models by 10kW, but it spits out more torque - 10Nm more.

    The quad camshafts really do make this mill worth it's weight in gold, which would be a lot, 'coz this engine's massive! But even with an 80-odd kilogram increase over the Falcon's Turbo six, it still moves with lightning pace.

    While peak torque of 520Nm doesn't arrive until 4500rpm, the engine is very flexible, offering a large glut of usable torque from as low as 2000rpm. But in addition to the copious amounts of torque, the Boss likes to rev, and all the way until the 5800rpm redline the engine will be baying for more, pouring on speed at an exponential rate.

    Peak power of 290kW arrives @ 5500rpm and at this engine speed the clearly audible roar is profoundly moving. With a legit stainless steel exhaust sytem with extractors, this V8 warbles, rumbles and then barks ferociously at anyone who tries to dominate. Try being the operative word here.

    The engine has 4-valves per cylinder [32 in total], chain-driven quad overhead camshafts, variable valve timing, a cast-iron block, aluminium alloy head and a 'premium fuel only' 10.5:1 compression ratio.

    While the manual gearbox makes better use of the available torque, the auto slusher is still a very nice piece of kit, able to hit almost 90km/h in first and about 140 in second. The sport shift mode works very well with the larger engine [when compared to the turbo six] and puts the power down nice and fluently. Known internally as the M97-019, the auto 'box is built by BTR and uses improved internals when compared to the standard Falcon automatic. A new low-stall torque converter is also fitted and when throttling off in the upper reaches of the rev range, there's a very V8 Supercar-esque transmission whine that adds to the experience.

    The five-speed manual gearbox, supplied by Tremec and codenamed the TR3650, was used on the TS50 AUIII model - it's ability to cope with massive torque one of the reasons behind its implementation. The shifter itself is a classy Momo stick, and it shifts between gates quite nicely, though the 1st-2nd upchange and 3rd-2nd downchange would sometimes get snagged slightly. There's a little bit of notchiness involved, but generally speaking it's a joy to use.

    The feedback from the variable-valve timing capable engine via the gearstick is quite intense, and is a constant reminder of the rampant power on tap. The clutch is nicely weighted [I was expecting it to be heavier] and engaging gears was seldom a problem, nor even a chore, thanks to a large 280mm clutch plate.

    You get a slippery diff as part of the package and beyond the performance aspect of this brilliant engine, the sensory characteristics will put a smile on your face every time you bury the foot.

    Ford's bad-boy Boss 290 mill is a real winner. It's got an abundance of power and torque right across the rev range, it's tractable and responsive, it sounds spectacular and it's highly refined, giving it more appeal than other low-tech V8s on the market.

    Extras

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    Starting with the sub-$60k GT, the entire family gets 'leccy windows, heaps of leg, head and shoulder room, not to mention a single-CD stereo with steering wheel controls. The stereo is same item fitted to the XR6 Turbo and is good, but not a patch on the GT-P's premium setup, with woofer, amp and more speakers and 6-CD in-dash stacker.

    Both FPV sedans get cruise control [with steering-wheel mounted controls], a trip computer, air-con, drilled alloy pedals and the hallowed GT (or GT-P) crest on the seats, floor mats and door sills. The single in-dash CD player of the more cost-effective GT is adequate, but the stereo distorts at higher volumes. Both cars get 60:40 split fold rear seats, so you can throw long and unwieldly stuff in the boot, and the steering wheel adjusts by tilt and reach, which is good.

    There's also suede covering the central storage box/front arm rest in both models, power steering, traction control, ABS, EBD, plus drivers, front passengers and front side (thorax) airbags.

    The GT-P get's everything the GT has, plus it gets a fancy central control unit that displays what is often a confusing amount of telemetry, such as outside temperature, distance to empty, average fuel consumption and so forth.

    Our test GT-P had all the bells and whistles, with a good GPS-based sat nav system and the premium audio option. We also had a rather sketchy blowout on the Great Ocean Road, but this was the result of a well-hidden and fairly deep pot hole, which easily scarred the low-profile tyres. Ergo, the full-sized spare was a godsend.

    Overall: 4.5/5

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    After driving the XR6 Turbo, which is the first BA Falcon I've driven, I didn't think it could get much better, but Ford Performance Vehicles proved me well and truly wrong with the tuned GT and GT-P.

    First is the value: Both these cars represent better value than their 300kW HSV equivalents, and the new BA Falcon's depreciation rate is improving compared to that of the outgoing AU.

    Second is performance: Both these FPV sports sedans go, stop and turn with such ease and composure, you began to forget your in large car - both cars have a feel that belies their abundance of bulk. The drive is always involving and it's hard not to smile when punting these cars around.

    Third is the look: They are tough, yet slightly understated and could well become the thinking man's hooligan car, with the brawn to backup such subtle beauty.

    At the end of the day, there's a lot to like about these two FPV V8s and the only major gripe will be when it comes time to refuel and the lack of ground clearance. The manual is more efficient when driven softly, but this shortcoming can be overlooked in the face of everything else, and for a 5.4-litre V8, it doesn't too badly.

    In terms of bang for your buck however, these two have outdone themselves, and the Pursuit Ute at less than $55,000 is an absolute bargain. Ford Performance Vehicles has unleashed a pair of muscle cars that, for its first effort, are wickedly potent in every respect. HSV, it's your move.

    "Respect the bulge."

    Make: Ford Performance Vehicles
    Model: GT/GT-P
    Price: $59,850/$69,850 (as tested)
    Transmission: 4-speed auto, w/sports shift & 5-speed manual
    Engine: 5.4-litre, Vee Eight-cylinder, 32-valves, quad camshafts, variable valve timing
    Fuel Consumption: City cycle - N/A, Highway cycle - N/A
    Seats: 5
    Safety: Driver and front passenger SRS airbag, two side front (thorax) airbags, ABS, Traction control, EBD
     
  2. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    394HP 5.4L V8 - all the luxury trimmings and toys - $42,218.58 US base price

    It's like Ford's answer to the CTS-V we don't have. :(
     
  3. BLoG

    BLoG Scented Meat

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    I'd drive it if it was orange
     
  4. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Orange is offered.

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    Even the Mustang/Ford GTish side stripes are optional. :big grin:
     
  5. Priest Tango

    Priest Tango Custom User Tits

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  6. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    cARboN FiBrE h00d y0!

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    With stainless mesh.
     
  7. BLoG

    BLoG Scented Meat

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    orange + black stripes + wheels from the first one powdercoated black :cool:
     
  8. Sonic

    Sonic Live every day to the fullest, for yesterday is go

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    And we will never EVER see it.
     
  9. vikingen

    vikingen OT Supporter

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    yep. y'all keep dream'in now ya hear :fawk:
     
  10. F8Lstang

    F8Lstang in savasana

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  11. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Is Ford ever going to paint anything orange in the US?
     
  12. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    Interior stitching and details match the exterior color, must be a Aussie thing.
     
  13. n2_space

    n2_space Space > *.*

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    :cool:

    Now....

    BRING IT OVER HERE DAMN IT!
     
  14. Kerpal

    Kerpal handlobraes

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  15. Short Bus

    Short Bus Beep beep!

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    I don't like this current trend in steering wheels.
     
  16. fallenbox

    fallenbox Guest

    Oddly enough the stylings look like it would compete more with the gto - a car that is way cheaper than that thing. Either way, I'd take the gto and / or the cts-v over that thing. It's a nice ford though.
     
  17. Melvin_91GT

    Melvin_91GT New Member

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    :mamoru:

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    SIDE NOTE: Bring that damn thing to the US!!!
     
  18. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    My bad. :o

    I'm a fan of orange pony/muscle cars. :hs:
     
  19. Sonic

    Sonic Live every day to the fullest, for yesterday is go

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    We get such blah cars, I can thank the people that continue to buy Tauruses, Accords and Camrys for that.:mad:
     
  20. BLoG

    BLoG Scented Meat

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    04 cobra and mach1 are available in comp orange
     
  21. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    05 Stang?
     
  22. fallenbox

    fallenbox Guest

    The only mach1's I see around here are either blue or orange.
     
  23. Meeocky

    Meeocky New Member

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  24. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    This makes me so happy and so sad at the same time. :hs: has never been more appropriate.
     
  25. slowbird

    slowbird I am the son, and the heir, of a shyness that is c OT Supporter

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    I want one so bad :wtc:

    It'd make the perfect daily driver to keep miles down on my Ford GT.

    I think I'll go trip on acid until I think I own both those cars.
     

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