Road Test - 2003 Toyota 4Runner Limited

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, Jan 14, 2003.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Running Upmarket

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    By John DiPietro
    Last updated: 2003-01-09

    When the 4Runner debuted back in the mid-'80s, it was offered only in a two-door body style with a four-cylinder engine as the lone power choice. Eventually, the demand for a more practical and accommodating body style prompted Toyota to produce a four-door 4Runner. The slower-selling two-door variant was dropped after the 1992 model year. Today, nearly every SUV on the market comes only as a four-door, and four-cylinder engines are rare. With the increased weight that accompanies upsizing and adding luxury car features, most of today's midsize SUVs are powered by either six- or eight-cylinder engines.

    Competition in this arena is at a fever pitch, with everyone from Kia to Porsche throwing their SUVs into the ring. Toyota enjoys the advantage of having a strong nameplate; everyone knows about the company's solid reputation for excellent build quality and bulletproof reliability. People are willing to pay more for a vehicle they know will provide them with pleasurable and mostly headache-free motoring for more years than they probably care to drive it. When we saw the $42,539 sticker for our 4Runner Limited, though, we wondered how much more. For that kind of money, one could look at luxury-brand SUVs, such as the BMW X5 3.0i, Mercedes-Benz ML320 and Lexus RX 330.

    Of course, those are all six-cylinder base models and not every 4Runner lists for such big cake as our loaded test vehicle. Manufacturers typically place the top dogs in the press fleets, perhaps to put those vehicles in the best possible light. In addition to pampering journalists, this practice also has the benefit of allowing most optional features, all the way up to a navigation system, to be evaluated as well — obviously, this wouldn't be possible if the vehicle was a stripper.

    In the 4Runner family, there are three trim levels: SR5, Sport Edition and Limited. Each is available in both two- or four-wheel drive with a choice of either V6 or V8 power. Pricing starts at $27,715 for an SR5 two-wheeler, which includes automatic climate control, a tilt and telescoping steering wheel, power windows and locks, cruise control, an eight-way manual-adjustable driver seat, a sound system with both cassette and CD players, an automatic transmission, antilock brakes and stability control. The Sport Edition, more than just an appearance package of foglamps and a hood scoop, comes with hardware such as bigger front brakes, 17-inch alloy wheels with 265/65 tires and Toyota's X-REAS (Diagonally Linked Relative Absorber System). X-REAS (which is optional in the Limited) connects diagonally opposed shock absorbers (hence the "X" in the name) and transfers the shock fluid medium from the unloaded shock to the loaded shock, thus minimizing body lean in the turns.

    Our Limited test model was decked out with leather-trimmed seating, power heated front seats, dual-zone climate control, monotone exterior paint scheme, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a "double-decker" cargo storage system, rear-seat audio controls (though the wireless headphones are extra at $44 each) and a 115-volt outlet.

    With the new body style, Toyota kept some of the previous 4Runner's styling cues, such as the grille and C-pillar shapes. Although the squared-off wheel wells reminded one staffer of a Chevy Avalanche, the overall look of the new 4Runner is attractive, appearing aggressive and classy at the same time. Also noticeable is the new size of this 'ute. With a wheelbase stretch of 4.5 inches and a width increase of 2.5 inches, there's a healthy increase in passenger room, especially in the backseat. But although it may look as if a third-row seat should be available (it isn't), it would probably be very short on legroom (as is its upscale twin, the Lexus GX 470) since the 4Runner's solid rear axle wouldn't allow a dropped floor, a la the Ford Explorer with its independent rear end.

    Scrutinizing the cabin of our Limited had us thinking we were in a Lexus. Most materials are well-finished and pleasing to the eye. Real stitching on the door panels and armrests, as well as faux granite accents add to the upscale feel. Gauges are large and clear, and most controls are simple to use. We liked the location of the trip reset button, on the left side of the instruments, where it's much easier to hit versus the usual locale that requires you to poke your hand through the steering wheel spokes. The climate controls may seem a bit befuddling at first because they look like knobs you would rotate when in fact you press on them to work the various functions. As we've stated many times before, we prefer three simple twist knobs (fan, temp and airflow) to gee-whiz designs.

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    Another slight glitch in the ergonomics department is found in the adjustment of the steering wheel. It tilts and telescopes, but requires two separate levers to do so, as opposed to a single lever such as that found in many VW models. And why did Toyota put the fuel door release at the bottom of the dash, next to the hood release and the driver's left knee? The traditional placement next to the driver seat worked fine. If it ain't broke…

    While we're picking nits, although the optional DVD-based navigation system is a breeze to use, its screen does double duty by also serving as the interface for the audio. Not only do you have to glance at the screen in order to see where to touch it, but some of the displays, such as the bass and treble, are hard to see due to a lack of contrast. And if you order the nav system, you can't get an in-dash CD changer, as there's only so much space in the dash for various gadgets. However, those of us who still have a huge collection of tapes do appreciate the cassette deck that comes along with the CD player.

    At 75 cubic feet, the 4Runner's maximum cargo capacity trails behind most of its midsize competitors, including the Ford Explorer (88 cubes) and Nissan Pathfinder (85 cubes). The 4Runner Limited does come with a nifty double-decker-style divider, which allows items to be stacked without fear of crushing the ones below. Another unique feature is the roll-down (one-touch power both ways) rear window which allows small items to be placed in the back without lifting the somewhat heavy tailgate.

    A choice of two drivetrains is offered for the new 4Runner. A new, all-aluminum muscle-bound 4.0-liter V6 puts out 245 horsepower and 282 pound-feet of torque, numbers that would've been impressive for a V8 of that size not too long ago. It comes mated to a four-speed automatic transmission. Our tester had a V8, the same "i-Force" 4.7-liter mill used in the Land Cruiser, Sequoia and Tundra, not to mention a couple of Lexus models. A five-speed automatic gearbox comes with the eight. Although it corrals 10 less horses (235), it pumps out a stout 320 lb-ft of twist, which is more telling as it's torque that allows a vehicle to jump off the line and level hills with ease. And jump our 4Runner did, as it rushed to 60 mph in just 7.6 seconds and ran through the quarter-mile in just under 16 ticks, not bad for a 4,400-pound SUV. Gear changes were typical Toyota — velvety smooth — and the five well-spaced ratios make the most of the V8's power.

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    Of course, stopping is important, too, and we rated the 4Runner's four-wheel disc setup (with its 134-foot stopping distance from 60 mph) only average. Our resident test pilot felt that the pedal was a little spongy while he performed panic stops at the track, and other staffers agreed that the pedal could've been a little firmer.

    With a solid rear axle, full-time 4WD (V8 models only; V6 models get part-time 4WD), a locking center differential, skid plates and technology that helps the vehicle climb and descend hills in a slow and controlled manner, the 4WD 4Runner is ready to rock off-road. Downhill Assist Control (DAC) automatically modulates the brakes and throttle to maintain as smooth a descent as possible. And Hill-start Assist Control (HAC) helps prevent the 4Runner from rolling backward on steep ascents when you lift your foot off the brake to give it some gas (but why didn't they call it Uphill Assist Control?).

    It all works like a charm; when we ventured off the beaten path and tackled terrain that looked better suited for dirt bikes, the 4Runner handled it with dispatch, nary putting a tire wrong. We'd go so far as to say that this vehicle's capabilities off-road are probably quite a bit greater than most drivers' nerves.

    In the real world (the one with asphalt, potholes and crazy drivers), the 4Runner is a much-improved mount over its predecessor. Where the old truck felt lazy and loose, the new one feels spirited and taut. Running through our favorite twisty canyon roads, the 4Runner impressed us all with well-weighted and precise steering and minimal body lean (some credit must go to the X-REAS setup). Over broken pavement, the Toyota felt solid as a rock and delivered a smooth ride that made it feel more like a car-based 'ute than one built on truck architecture (which utilizes full-frame construction that is more rugged and ideal for off-road bashing). A new frame that features fully boxed rails goes a long way toward eliminating the torsional flex that the older model exhibited. On the freeway, only some wind ruffle intruded into the cabin, noticeable chiefly due to the lack of other noise, such as tire rumble or engine roar.

    There are standard safety features galore. In addition to the expected three-point belts all 'round and antilock brakes, the 4Runner has stability control (dubbed VSC for Vehicle Skid Control) and traction control as well as BrakeAssist (which supplies full braking power when it detects, via sudden pedal movement, a panic stop). A seat mounted side airbag and headliner mounted side curtain airbag package is a $500 option.

    Mulling over our week with the 4Runner, we were struck by how Toyota nearly always hits the nail on the head when revamping one of its vehicles. With the 2003 4Runner, the company has done it again by providing a level of ride comfort and on-road handling that rivals most car-based "soft-roaders," while also enhancing its already renowned off-road skills.

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    Pros: Composed on- and off-road, comfortable cabin, powerful optional V8.

    Cons: Spongy brake pedal feel, fussy audio controls (with navigation system), no third-row seat option, pricey.

    Edmunds.com Says: As expected, Toyota's updated 4Runner is a well-honed effort. For the best value, we recommend resisting the leather-lined Limited; the well-equipped SR5 should suit most folks just fine.

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  2. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    My grandparents got one that looks exactly but I think it has all grey leather, pretty god damn nice if you ask me.
     
  3. phatcow

    phatcow My boyfriend, who had already wept. OT Supporter

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    for fourty two thousand... jesus christ..


    Nissan Pathfinder please.
     
  4. Dr. Woo

    Dr. Woo Guns don't kill people

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    Great SUV.
     
  5. iZero

    iZero Guest

    It looks like it was designed by a committee. They took everyone's idea and tossed them all together. The hood scoop they put on certain models looks especially lame.
     
  6. ZAQ786

    ZAQ786 BMW: The reason Lexus is still 'In the pursuit of

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    X5 Please
     
  7. TenzoR

    TenzoR She is hot hot hot

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    my dad wants one ..but i want an evo .....mmmm go figure
     
  8. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    The Lexus flavor earned Four Wheeler's and 4Wheel and Off-Road's yearly awards.

    Not bad, but that's a lot of $$$ for a 4Runner.
     
  9. mucky

    mucky .

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    :eek: :ugh2:
     
  10. Platinum_Thunder

    Platinum_Thunder Reliability for life and liberty

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    Personally, I would rather have a used Land Cruiser
     
  11. F8Lstang

    F8Lstang in savasana

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  12. Sonic

    Sonic Live every day to the fullest, for yesterday is go

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    I like it.
     
  13. Accords 4U2 NV

    Accords 4U2 NV OT's Resident Desi

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    sorry it isn't one of your 10821081 ford SUVs
     
  14. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    :werd:
     
  15. Accords 4U2 NV

    Accords 4U2 NV OT's Resident Desi

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    :werd: x 403820832

    the 96 L.C. :bowdown: :bowdown:
     
  16. bioyuki

    bioyuki Ich habe Angst

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    Not bad for a SUV.

    I'd take that over a ML320 or X5 3.0 for sure.
     
  17. Platinum_Thunder

    Platinum_Thunder Reliability for life and liberty

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    :bigthumb:

    I always get shit for liking them...but people don't know what they are talking about
     
  18. 98R139

    98R139 Active Member

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    After owning a German-made Mercedes (a brand new one too) and you would greatly appreciate the reliability that Toyota (or Honda) offers.
     

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