Riding Techniques

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by 4cd-Air, Sep 2, 2002.

  1. 4cd-Air

    4cd-Air Rape seemed like the next logical step

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    Per flynfrog's request, this thread will encompass riding techniques we have all learned. Flynfrog can cover the Quads.

    1) Ride slow to ride fast-
    Never ever go faster then you are capable. Speed somes with learning the bike, and the best way to learn the bike is at slow speed.

    2) Smooth is fast-
    When you ride smooth, you will be faster then somebody who is erratic with their movements. Smooth on the throttle, smooth in and out of turns, smooth on the brakes. It is also much safer, as well as better to watch.

    3) Weight transfer-
    On a sport bike at least, your weight is your friend and your enemy. If you know how to support yourslef correctly, then corners become no big task. Use your legs and thighs, not your arms. Stay lined up with the bike, but don't be afraid to push farther away from you by sitting up.

    Everybody else can just add from here.:bigthumb:
     
  2. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    http://www.dirtwheelsmag.com/detail.asp?id=62

    ENTERING THE TURN

    When approaching a corner on a cross-country or motocross track, you should be in a slight crouch with your rear end off the seat and your weight towards the rear. This way, when you hit the front and rear brakes, there will be more weight over the rear wheels where it’s needed. Your arms resting on the handlebars will provide plenty of weight for pushing the braking front tires into the dirt. "In smoother track conditions such as TT and speedway, you would simply stay seated and slide your weight back to get better rear braking. The trick to racing just about any vehicle is to do most of your braking while travelling in a straight line—that’s when they are most effective." explains Denton.
    The one thing top racers don’t do is coast into a corner. You should stay on the gas hard until the last possible moment and then, at the same time, be applying the brakes to the maximum. So the order of business while entering a corner is full throttle, chop throttle, and at the same time full brakes—no coasting!

    What about the throttle and clutch? Many racers pull in the clutch and make their downshifts while they’re doing the initial braking, all the while keeping the revs up with the throttle. In the middle of the turn (at the apex), they start feeding out the clutch, feeling for the rear wheels to get traction before applying full throttle.

    DIFFERENT CIRCUMSTANCES

    There are basically two ways to attack a corner on a quad. Coming in tight to the inside and going straight to the outside, and then making a quick abrupt turn is called "squaring it off." The other way is to come in wide and follow the outside edge with more momentum. That’s called "rounding it off." Whether you square off or round off a turn depends on if you are going for a pass, if you are holding someone off, or where the next obstacle happens to be. If none of that is happening, you simply have to figure out which is fastest, but we can’t tell you how to figure that out. "Knowing whether to round off or square off a corner only comes with experience and race smarts," says Hawk. Gust explains another aspect, "Sometimes I like to square off a tall berm to get a downhill drive off the banking. That way I also protect my line from someone else diving in on me by taking up so much of the track."
    Of course staying tight to the inside and squaring it off is one of the most common defensive moves on the race track, even if it isn’t always the fastest. "You practically have to bump someone out of the way if they’re holding the inside all the time," says Denton. "But sometimes that’s what has to be done."

    MAKING THE APEX

    Once you’ve applied the brakes enough to make the corner, move your weight to the front and to the inside of the machine to give the front end a good bite and to keep the quad from hiking up on the outside two wheels. Alright, how far forward and how far off to the side? Well, that all depends on the surface in the corners, the type of tires you’re running, and the width of the quad. Narrow quads like stockers require a more pronounced "hanging off" than a widened racing machine. On a smooth TT track where the outside rear tire is searching for traction, you won’t be hanging off near as much. Feeling and knowing just how far forward and off the side you need to be comes with experience. Eventually, it feels instinctual.

    Some pro racers drag the front brake slightly in the middle of a corner to get more traction for turning. And when squaring off a corner, the key is to stay hard on the rear brake as you start the turn with the handlebars, thereby allowing the quad to spin around in a "brakeslide." Most of these moves at the apex are done with the clutch in and the throttle revved.

    One of the most fascinating things about watching Gary Denton race was how subtle his weight transfers were while cornering. "You don’t need to be wildly hanging off the side with your outside foot up in the air," explained the eight-time National Champ. "You want to keep your weight low and your moves deliberate and smooth, all the time feeling what your quad is doing and where it needs weight for traction."
    In the woods, Barry Hawk works on getting a certain rhythm going. "When my quad is working good and there’s no traffic in front, I can get really keyed in to the corners, slicing and dicing my way through the woods, he explains. "Hang off this side, hang off that side, keeping it smooth, keeping the momentum going, concentrating on how close the inside front wheel is getting to the trees, but always looking ahead to the next corner."

    GETTING OUT IS JUST AS IMPORTANT

    You may have been a hero at the approach and in the middle of the turn, but unless you get back on the gas as quickly as possible on the way out, the other guy may pass you. Basically you’re dealing with three things as you exit the corner—(1) traction to the rear tires, (2) getting pointed straight to the next corner, and (3) keeping the front end down.
    The keys to these three things are weight transfer and throttle control. "As you start to finish the corner, ease the clutch out with lots of revs to the point where the rear tires almost lose traction," says Gust. "That way you’re getting maximum drive. As soon as you’re pointed in the right direction, hammer it! Since your weight was already near the front for the corner, that should keep the front end down, but now you want maximum traction at the rear wheels, so you can slide back on the seat. You still don’t want to do a big wheelie on the straight or you’ll have to back off and blow the whole deal. Just rip through the gears and get to the next corner quicker than the other guys."
    So, you think you got it? Time to put in some practice. Brake as hard as you can while still travelling in a straight line. Work on squaring off, rounding off, and brakesliding. Try hanging off the side as little as possible, keeping your weight low. Ease the clutch out to get max traction with as little wheelspin as possible. And finally, keep the front under control as you throttle out to do it all over again.



    copied form dirth wheels mag

    one thing that is recomend between mx racers is never coast be on teh gas or the breaks or both at the same time coasting is slow time that you could bne goign faster the trick is knowing when to break and when to gas.

    Experince there is no repalcment for this you can have tons of natural ablity but if you make stupid mistakes you wont win a race i learned this by experince. i would be leading a race take one cornner to hard and lose my lead.

    Hole shots> The first step to a good finish is a good start

    The technique i use may differ form others but it has been pretty succsfull for me

    step one clean out the gate your tires wont get traction unless they can bite solid dirt so kick all of the loose stuff out of the box so you can get good grip.

    step two watch the starter depending on the tracks start system you migh be looking at lights or a flag i pay little attention to this once the 5 secons sigh goes. i focus on the gate pull second gear and slowly let out the clutch till i starrt to roll forward then when the gate drops i dump the clutch and roll teh trottle to keep the front down.

    step three ok you made it off the line now how are you going to fit 30 quads in a 2 lane track pick a good line and hold it dont second guess your self rember thare are 30 guys behind you ready to run you over if if mess up once your threw the cornner its a little less hectic and you can start to get your ryhthm
     
  3. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    [​IMG]
    jsut to help out my ego
     
  4. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    but notice my ride stance compared to the other guy i am off teh seat feet est wide arms relaxed
    hes on the seat wiht his legs in to close but he ahd the line in the cornner and i didnt
     
  5. katabrat

    katabrat Guest

    Its a quad,bikes are better.
     
  6. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    bikes are easy please dont runign a good psot with yoru midless shit
     
  7. katabrat

    katabrat Guest

    Ok,could not help myself,corners are easy,whats the tips on setting up for jumps,ridden bikes all my life,I was just given a quad,not to shure on setting up for jumps.
     
  8. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    well first and most important is the shocks i dotn knwo what kind of quad you have but its one of teh best things you can invest in on it

    you want to be accelrating all the way up the jump not punching the gas at teh top smoth throttle is verry important once you hit the top of the jump start adjusting for the landing try to land front wheels jsut before the back shifting your weight in teh air and throttle and brake in teh air will help to level out teh quad your shocks should be set up so that on the biggest jump on the track you barley bottom out.
     
  9. katabrat

    katabrat Guest

    The quad I was given is an ex 300 honda,2001,I would haved loved a 400 or any bigger quad,Thanx for the info I will give it a try.(worst I can do is crash)
     
  10. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    congrats on the quad if you plan to race invest in some turf tamers or hole shots and get soem bead locks for the back


    THE SINGLE BIGGEST IMPROVMENT YOU CAN MAKE IS SUSPNSION
    get a good pair of shocks tcs is a reasonbly priced brand stay away from works on your quad i would spend a ton but since yoru already down on power you need to have good suspension +2 arms and axel would also help but id find a differnt quad first






    always rember its not the jumping that hurts its the landing
     
  11. katabrat

    katabrat Guest

    Thats what I was thinking sell the 300 and get a 650 but not shure on what I want.Any ideas?About 4 years ago I had a 500 suzuki,that was a fun one,it was set up for the sand. :bigthumb:
     
  12. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    if you are planning to race i would not recomend a 650 they are to tall and heavy to race you have a coulpe of routs you can take if you want to race one would be to find a 250r frame and build your own like i did its proaby the best overall espcaily if you go with an aftermarket frame liek a roll or a leager. Or you can get a 400 ex add a big bore shocks arms wheels tires ect and go racing with a little work. New canodale race ready but cost 12grand the new suzuki shows promise my freind is building one of those. The biggest thing to rember teh motor dosent wint the race teh suspension does the 250r 400ex canodale and suzuki all have verry good suspensions there motors varry though. the 250 r the cheapes to work on the motor but the cannondale dosent realy even need motor work
     
  13. katabrat

    katabrat Guest

    To old to race,To young to die,just wana play(fast)
     
  14. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    hmm id look at a new suzuki parts are easy to come buy ahs great power and suspnsion out of the box but has lots of potental if you want to up grade


    or buy my 250r frame and start your own project quad :naughty:
     
  15. Josh717

    Josh717 Guest

    <----to do this: go fast and click your feet together in the air
     
  16. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    you forgot then put feet back on the pegs before landing
     

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