RedHat 8.0 help... or any linux pro just answer my questions :o

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Tk, Mar 24, 2003.

  1. Tk

    Tk Well-Known Member

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    i installed redhat today on the lappy... awsome os as far as i can see, just a lot different than windows and theres a lot more to it than i expected.

    i basically got it because i want to learn more about the system and how to use it. im going to arkansas tomorrow and itll be 8 hours in a car, with my laptop, that only has redhat on it.

    how do i install software? does all software come decompiled so you have to compile it and install it?

    i am trying to install kismet right now (wireless network sniffer) so i can wardrive all tomorrow, but i get past the ./configure and make install commands, and im left hanging because it doesnt say how to run or install the file.

    redhat automatically setup my networking settings, but how do i access files on my pc (if i even can). id like to copy over some mp3s and divx files.

    do i have to mount my cdrom/floppy drive every time i want to access them? ...or can i just add desktop shortcuts to them like windows?

    thats all for now... thanks a lot!
     
  2. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    Aight, I'll see if I can knock down all these questions. :cool:

    Not all software comes as source that needs to be compiled. Most applications will also be availble in a "binary package". For Red Hat systems they are commonly RPM's, which stands for Redhat Package Manager. http://www.rpmfind.net is an invaluable resource for any Red Hat user. Also read the man page for the rpm command. 'man rpm' will do that for you (w/o the ').

    After looking at Kismet's homepage it doesn't look like they have a binary package for RH 8.0. (One thing to keep in mind is that all binary packages have to match your architecture, for example if your laptop has an Intel of AMD chip in it, it is more than likely an i386 architecture.) Notice that all the binary packages are for the arm architecture which are commonly used in handheld devices.

    To install source software (or tarballs as they are commonly called) extract them and always read the INSTALL or README file, they will more than likely give you step by step instructions to installing the program.

    If your files on the other machine are shared through a Windows networking share then you can access them through Samba, the samba-client RPM should already be installed on a stock system. To mount the share create (as root) create a new folder 'mkdir /mnt/media' then you will have to mount the share with something like this 'mount -t smbfs -o username=username //10.0.0.1/mediashare /mnt/media' where username is the username that you use on your windows machine. And 10.0.0.1 is the IP of the windows machine. For more info on this see 'man mount' and 'man smbmount'

    There should be desktop shortcuts for the CDROM and floppy on the default Red Hat desktop. If not you can alter the mount command I gave above for mounting the CDROM and floppy. Something along the lines of 'mount -t iso9660 /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom' should work.

    Learn to use the 'man' command, w/o internet access on the road it will be your most useful tool.


    Hope this helped. :)
     
  3. Tk

    Tk Well-Known Member

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    holy fuck, thanks a lot rob... very good explanation :big grin:
     
  4. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    No prob. I once went through all the things you did. :big grin:
     

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