Recommendations for a Cam Corder

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by baldyguy, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. baldyguy

    baldyguy Deep, but not Profound

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    I'm currently looking for a good cam corder right now, and i'm willing to pay up to $600.00. I want something that's good and not too bulky. What's the difference between Hi-8 and Digital? Is it just that one has a small video cassette tape and the other uses a memory card? What are some of the pros and cons of each?
     
  2. baldyguy

    baldyguy Deep, but not Profound

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    Bump, come on guys, help me out :)
     
  3. jeck

    jeck New Member

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    here we go baldguy....

    hi-8: these tapes are analog tapes. theyre pretty old technology. lifetime doesnt last very long on these things. id give them about 4 years till you start seeing the nasty spurts and audio warps in your footage. from what i can concur.. the tapes are plastic based and like i said earlier... its more likely to get warped over time/temperatures.

    good thing about hi-8....

    theyre alot cheaper.. ALOT cheaper than dv cams... tapes are cheaper as well. hi-8 isnt the oldest, but it is one of the older mediums to run with. there is the option of the short lived digital-8, but i think sony is the only brand that supports it. though digi8 and hi8 may have the same body structure, a digi8 tape cannot be played in a hi8 cam. digi8 tapes can only be played and recorded by mostly digi8 camcorders. however, there are a couple camcorder that do both... you just gotta spend a little bit more. try looking for the sony dcrtrv350. it does both hi8 and digi8. digi8 will last longer and has almost the same funciton as real digital video(dv). and youll get the same firewire/svideo functions like the dv cams.

    both good choices starting out. but since youre spending 600 bucks...

    glass user is right. the canon optura20 is a good camera. it has a 3.5 inch screen, 16x optical zoom, 320x digital zoom, pretty good sized lens, and speaking of the lens, its a canon lens. youre getting a good quality lens that performs well in low-lit areas. very nice camera.

    but.. for digital video (dv)

    dv is the newer standard for digital video. theres dvd direct now, but if you ever read this thread again, ask me and ill post the pros/cons of direct dvd too.
    anyway.. dv the newer standard. its smaller and has a stronger, metal-based medium to right one. similar to the tape drives people never used. it was a good idea and now its being put to good use. with this, the footage acts more like a data standard rather than just normal footage. the benefit? youll have a longer lasting video without worries of warping or deterioration.

    the big advantage over analog tapes from dv is the higher quality of resolution and shit. dv cams record at 500 or 520 lines of resolution while analog hits the 300. the higher the lines.. the clearer the picture. its alot better if you watch it on an xbr or whatever.

    in addition to that shit, the direct connection from cam ot computer for editing is alot easier. analog hi8, youll need a converter box. these things will set you back like 200. firewire is a good thing. no dropfamerate. youll love it.

    you can probly find out that dv is a better buy. especially for 600... youll get and excellent camcorder. a normal analog hi8 cams doesnt even touch 500 bucks.

    you also mentioned about memory cards as the medium?? there are some dv cams that record on card... you just gotta flip the switch and it starts recording. but the difference between hi8 and digital is not tape and memory card.. its the type of tape.
    if you go to your local retailer.. youll find some cams that let you switch from tape to card.. the d-snap or panasonic SVAV100 records soley on secure digital/multimedia cards. it comes with a 512mb card that lets you record for a good amount of hours as mpeg2. mpeg4 makes it even longer... but with less quality.

    i hope this helps you out. if you have more questions.. feel free to ask. i sell cameras for a living and thats why i know all this shit. and yea.. i have a preference for sony and canon cameras if you wanna start shopping now.
     
  4. johnson

    johnson New Member

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    bump

    jeck, what are the differences between the Optura 10 and 20? According to the link, all I see is a 3.5 LCD vs 2.5LCD and bigger battery (probably more capacity for larger LCD). What other camcorders should I look at in this price range? Panasonic PV-GS70, PV-GS120, PV-DV953? I also saw the filter threads are 37mm. What are some useful filters to get? Thanks.

    http://www.canondv.com/optura10_20/compare.html

    Read about 2-3 reviews each for the cameras and put pros and cons below. Looks like the Optura 20 is a better choice.

    Canon Optura 10/20
    Pros:
    16X optical zoom
    3.5" LCD
    Excellent manual (ive read canon's are the best..i have a canon g2 camera)
    Lots of optional accessories

    Cons:
    Battery has to be attached to camera for recharging
    3.0"W x 3.6"H x 7.3"D and it weighs 1 lb 7 oz without tape and battery.
    Bottom loading cassette
    Tripod mount is plastic
    Viewfinder does not extend

    Panasonic PV-GS70
    Pros:
    3CCD
    Battery can be recharged outside of camera
    Wired remote control with mic for narraration
    2.8 x 3.0 x 5.2 inches
    Color viewfinder
    Top loading cassette
    Good color using GretagMacbeth ColorChecker

    Cons:
    10X optical zoom
    Magic Pix and Image Stabilization doesnt work well
    Lousy users manual
    No manual focus
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2004

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