R&T Nissan 350Z Challenge - Vs. BMW M3, Chev. Z06, and Porsche 911.

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  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    David and the Goliaths - With a sling full of value and performance, the Nissan 350Z takes aim at three sports-car giants.

    By Kim Wolfkill • Photos by Jeff Allen & Marc Urbano

    [​IMG]

    Ever since Nissan first talked about bringing back the Z-car at the 1999 North American International Auto Show, sports-car fans have been wondering just how good it will be. Now that it's here, the 350Z has shown itself to be a fun, fast and genuinely enjoyable sports car. And priced between $26,269 and $34,079, it has also turned out to be a refreshingly affordable one. Just as its progenitor did more than 30 years ago, the new Z shows that impressively high levels of performance can be had without breaking the bank.

    Having already tested the 350Z on its own and found it to be the real deal (see our full road test, September 2002), it's only fitting that we bring in some competition to see what it's made of. With that in mind, we've assembled three highly seasoned sports cars to measure the 350Z against: the BMW M3, Chevrolet Corvette Z06 and Porsche 911. They cover a relatively wide price spectrum, but with similar performance objectives. The M3 offers a sports-car experience with room for four, the Corvette enjoys unrivaled bang for the buck, while the 911, well, is a 911. The benchmark.

    Unlike previous comparison tests, there won't be the usual 1-2-3-4 ranking, but instead an examination of all four cars focusing on how well the new kid on the block compares with each of the other three (we'll call it the "Z Factor"). Performance and personality will certainly be instrumental to our evaluation, but given the range of prices for this foursome, so will overall value. In addition to logging laps and collecting data, we're also crunching numbers to see how the Nissan fares from a price-versus-performance standpoint relative to the M3, Z06 and 911. The other three may cost more, but how much (if any) extra performance do those thousands of dollars buy? Does the difference manifest itself in the form of better acceleration, handling and braking or a more satisfying driving experience? Where does price help the Z and where does it hurt?

    Nissan 350Z — Capable new contender

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    On paper, our 350Z Track model has all the makings of a modern sports car: a quick-revving 3.5-liter 24-valve V-6, short-throw 6-speed manual gearbox, independent multilink front/rear suspension and sure-stopping Brembo brakes. Power is a respectable 287 bhp at 6200 rpm with 274 lb.-ft. of torque. These are solid sports-car credentials wrapped in suitably racy sheet metal.

    On the road, the new Z does its best to satisfy the expectations its spec sheet quietly hints at. Fire it up and a quick spin around the block tells you pretty much what the 350Z has to offer. The cockpit feels almost instantly accommodating, albeit heavy on the plastic, and the controls do everything they're asked. The Track model's cloth sport seats provide necessary support during hard cornering without feeling overly confining around the thighs or shoulders.

    [​IMG]

    Lean on the throttle and a satisfying wave of linear acceleration accompanies the quick, mechanical throws of the compact shift lever. The V-6 pulls smartly from midrange[/B to its 6600-rpm redline, yet seems to lack the top-end snap some of us were expecting from nearly 290 bhp. Still, it's fast enough to blast the 350Z to 60 mph in a scant 5.8 seconds and through the quarter mile in 14.4 sec. at 99.7 mph. As revs climb higher, the cabin takes on a decidedly boomier tone, contrasting sharply with the pleasing growl emitted by its twin exhaust pipes.

    Dynamically, there are few cars so immediately comfortable to drive quickly. Thoughtful chassis and suspension tuning have made it relatively easy (and hugely satisfying) to hustle the Z around offramps and racetracks alike. Excellent overall balance allows it to seamlessly process braking, steering and throttle inputs without unduly upsetting the chassis. Fore-to-aft weight transfer has a minimal effect on the car's composure, allowing the driver to transition from braking to power more quickly when cornering.

    [​IMG]
    Despite being the least powerful of the group at 287 bhp, the Nissan 350Z's 3.5-liter V-6 delivers plenty of low-end torque, making the car feel quick off the line.

    At street-legal speeds, it seems there's very little a driver can do to upset the Z's composure. Overly enthusiastic corner entries result in a benign dose of understeer, while mid-turn throttle lift merely causes the nose to tighten its line. For those who really go overboard, Nissan's Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) uses the standard complement of speed/yaw sensors and selective brake intervention to effectively restore order. Adding to this sense of security are the Track model's Brembo brakes, which deliver consistent, fade-free performance in all conditions.

    Even at the high speeds we encountered driving on the 2.5-mile "Big Track" at Willow Springs International Raceway, getting the 350Z to rotate its tail takes a concerted effort. Its natural tendency is toward a slight turn-in/mid-turn push that gives way to a balanced corner exit drift. The result is a car whose considerable limits are fun to explore without venturing too far into the unknown. Senior Editor Andy Bornhop said it best following his first hot laps in the Nissan, "The 350Z inspires confidence because it doesn't feel like it will ever bite you." This confidence is most evident in the lap times, where the 350Z turned a fast lap just marginally faster than both the M3 and 911. Being able to push the Z comfortably right up to the limit contributed substantially to its surprising pace around the track.

    [​IMG]

    Now that we know the Nissan 350Z has the goods to be considered a genuine sports car, let's see how it stacks up against three of the hardest-hitting veterans in the game.

    BMW M3 With SMG II — Everyday performance made easy

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    One trip through the gears and it's readily apparent why people are so enamored of this car. With their latest iteration of the venerable inline-6, BMW's engineers have produced one of the sweetest running 6-cylinder engines ever built. Thanks to an abundance of technology — Double VANOS valve operation, six electronically controlled throttles, high compression and an 8000-rpm redline — the M3's 3.2-liter engine possesses an uncannily smooth power delivery.

    Not only smooth, but also flexible, the M3's six has a wide, usable powerband. Midrange punch is already good, but once above 4000 rpm, the engine adopts an even more menacing snarl as it pulls strongly right up to redline. "It begs to be wound out," said Executive Editor Doug Kott. "Where the Corvette and 911 are content to be short-shifted, the M3 likes to rev." It turns out 333 bhp at 7900 rpm and 269 lb.-ft. of torque.

    [​IMG]

    Chassis control is managed by an M-tuned MacPherson-strut front and multilink rear suspension mated to an M Variable limited-slip differential. Providing the necessary grip are 18-in. wheels and tires, while heavy-duty brakes keep all this speed in check. Also stepping in to offer occasional spin control is BMW's Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) system. For this test, our car is equipped with the optional Sequential Manual Gearbox (SMG) that uses electrohydraulic actuators to facilitate ultra-fast shifts of the 6-speed manual transmission via steering wheel-mounted paddles.

    Under street driving conditions, the M3 doesn't seem that different from a stiffly sprung 3 Series. The seating position feels natural, lines of sight are clear and the interior switchgear is first-rate. Grab a footful of throttle, however, and the engine springs to life, urging the car forward with a new sense of enthusiasm. Bend into a turn and the reward is a flat, stable cornering attitude with just enough understeer to advise caution toward the limit. Roll out of the throttle mid-turn and the rear rotates predictably until throttle is smoothly reapplied. With plenty of grip and near-instantaneous power, the M3 proves fun and exciting to drive quickly.

    Hit the track and it's much of the same. Similar to the 350Z, it can simply be jumped into and driven. It does what it's asked and accepts driver inputs comfortably and with little fuss. Balance is good and the car's cornering attitude can be easily altered with minor throttle and steering changes. As cornering speeds climb, the understeering safety net carried over from the street becomes more pronounced, costing a small measure of mid-corner speed. Rotating the car with throttle changes gets around some of this, but for serious track enthusiasts, an adjustment to the M3's wheel alignment would likely eliminate this situation.

    [​IMG]
    BMW M3's 333-bhp 3.2-liter inline-6 loves to rev, and possesses the best top-end song of the group.

    Those same track enthusiasts might also like the lightning-quick shifts of the SMG transmission. With paddle-actuated shifts performed faster than any human could do, the Formula 1-derived system takes some of the thinking out of driving fast. Do-it-yourself stalwarts may still prefer the satisfaction of performing their own gearchanges, but there's no denying the system's speed and convenience at the track. Around town, our crew's opinions were mixed. International Editor Sam Mitani was enamored of SMG in all conditions, while the rest of us still prefer the 6-speed manual for street use.

    [​IMG] Factor: BMW M3

    [​IMG]

    • The Z's V-6 lacks some of the M3's inline-6 smoothness and horsepower, yet enjoys more torque at lower revs. The result is an engine that's nearly as powerful at the racetrack, but feels less satisfying and refined around town, where it matters more.
    • Inside, the $20,000 price difference becomes most apparent in the quality of the materials. The BMW's cabin doesn't work $20K better, but it's a more pleasant, sophisticated place to spend your daily commute. Poor outward views and little usable space also hurt the Z especially compared with the M3's four seats and trunk.
    • Dynamically, it's tough to fault the Nissan's unflappable handling. It's more confidence-inspiring than the M3 (which is saying a lot) with less at-limit understeer and none of the M3's off-throttle oversteer. A little oversteer would actually be welcome at the track, but the current setup increases the safety margin for the average driver around town.
    • The braking edge goes to the Nissan, whose Brembo stoppers posted the exact same braking numbers as the M3, but were more fade-resistant during high-speed use.

    Bottom Line: Similar to the Z in performance, the M3 delivers a more sophisticated driving experience, but at a price premium.

    Chevrolet Corvette Z06 — Track tuned, street civilized

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    From the moment pricing was first announced, the Corvette Z06 has been the best performance buy in modern sports cars. It's hard to argue with 405 bhp, 400 lb.-ft. of torque, 0-60 mph in 4.5 sec. and a 171-mph top speed all for a shade over $50,000. What's more, after years of evolution and well-executed chassis tuning, this latest Corvette also offers refreshing levels of refinement to go with its searing performance.

    Drive a new Z06 on your favorite stretch of bad highway and the ride is light-years ahead of previous iterations. It's still firmer than many sports cars, but not nearly as harsh as its extreme speed potential would lead you to expect. Even more surprising is that, among our foursome, the Z06 actually delivers the most compliant ride in daily driving conditions. Few doubted the Vette would trounce all comers at the racetrack, but would it also be the most comfortable?

    Instrumental to its dizzying speed is the Z06's ability to generate huge amounts of acceleration and grip. With the lightest weight (3110 lb.) and highest horsepower of the bunch, it comes as little surprise the Corvette powers away like it does. The 5.7-liter LS6 engine produces prodigious amounts of thrust from 3500-6500 rpm and then starts all over again with each shift of the 6-speed manual transmission. Even in higher gears, acceleration continues unabated until the speedo climbs above 140 mph after which speed gain tapers off slightly.

    [​IMG]

    Keeping this terrestrial rocket on the ground is a combination of 17/18-in. wheels/tires and a well-sorted suspension. Track-tuned bits like a thick 30.0-mm front anti-roll bar, specially tuned shock absorbers, stiff transverse rear leaf spring and a half degree more negative camber at all four corners combine to grace the Z06 with unparalleled high-speed grip. At lower speeds, a deft right foot (and traction control) is the only thing keeping the rear tires from lighting up.

    Balance remains impressively neutral at speed with neither the front nor rear end itching to step out before the other. At the track, transitioning from braking to turning to accelerating takes some practice as the body has a tendency to seemingly hover over the wheels for a moment until the chassis has had a chance to take a set. Once loaded, the chassis responds well to throttle inputs and rewards the driver with increasing levels of grip. Just as impressive are the brakes, which serve up excellent initial bite, predictable control and the shortest stopping distances of our group.

    [​IMG]
    The Chevrolet Corvette's 5.7-liter V-8 pumps out 405 bhp, and it serves as a testament to the adage "There's no replacement for displacement."

    Performance aside, the Corvette suffers from some of the same interior cost-cutting issues that plague the 350Z. While delivering a perfectly comfortable seating position and sound ergonomics, the Z06's cockpit still lacks the higher-quality feel of its more expensive competition. Some of the plastics would better suit a Camaro and for a car with such a high level of lateral grip, the seats don't offer nearly enough lateral support.

    Despite these quibbles there's still no denying the Z06's amazing bang-for-buck factor. It delivers the performance expected from cars costing two to three times as much yet walks away from cars in its immediate price vicinity.

    [​IMG] Factor: Chevrolet Corvette Z06

    [​IMG]

    • There's little the Z or any other car in this test can do against the Z06's monstrous V-8. Its unrelenting power and bottomless torque make it hard to beat.
    • The Corvette requires a careful period of acclimatization before its full performance potential can be realized. The 350Z is almost immediately easy to drive quickly and doesn't demand nearly the same seat time to get comfortably up to speed.
    • Both cars share interiors that can't compete with other high-end sports cars. This certainly doesn't affect the performance of either car, but plays a role in the quality of the overall driving experience. At their price points something had to give, and better the interior than the mechanicals.
    • Under hard acceleration, both cars create quite an interior racket, but in different ways. The 350Z's overly mechanical engine sounds drown out the much more pleasing exhaust note, while the Z06's engine and exhaust work in concert to produce a loud, intoxicating roar.

    Bottom Line: Brothers in arms from a performance versus price standpoint, each delivers impressive performance for the money without the frills of more expensive competitors.

    Porsche 911 Targa — Ultimate rear-engine refinement

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    No one said it would work in a sports car, but Porsche has continued to baffle physicists for more than 40 years with its nonstop improvement of the rear-engine layout. The latest-generation 996 platform has gone the furthest at refining the 911 so effectively that the tail-happy behavior of past 911s is all but a myth.

    Due to end-of-the-year availability issues, we were unable to secure a Sport Chassis-equipped 911 Carrera 2 for testing, so instead we went with a 911 Targa. Initially there were concerns over its torsional rigidity versus a coupe's, but as it turned out, the Targa felt every bit as stiff as previous coupes we've driven and did an excellent job of representing the 911 line. The only real performance difference is that the Targa weighs about 150 lb. more than the coupe.

    [​IMG]

    Underway, it's tough to tell the difference as the 911's signature flat-6 works its melodious magic in back. Displacing 3.6 liters and putting out 320 bhp, this latest engine is the quietest and smoothest-revving Porsche powerplant to date. Combining increased displacement (over the 2001 models' 3.4 liters) with VarioCam Plus variable valve timing has produced improved midrange torque. Performance from the 6-speed manual transmission is typically Porsche. It doesn't draw attention to itself with any glaring strengths or weaknesses, quietly getting the job done shift after shift, lap after lap.

    Given its unorthodox configuration, the 911's chassis never ceases to amaze with its ability to go fast. At lower speeds, the MacPherson-strut front and multilink rear suspension does a commendable job of keeping the chassis settled and the car pointed in the right direction. As speeds climb, weight transfer becomes more pronounced and the 911 occasionally hints at its former self. A fair bit of vertical suspension movement reminds drivers to keep their inputs smooth and a mild dose of mid-turn/exit understeer prevents too much in the way of tail-out shenanigans. "Wide rear tires and decades of tuning haven't completely tamed this car's rear bias," commented Kott. "You learn to respect it and modify your driving accordingly."

    [​IMG]
    There's little to fault with the Porsche 911 Targa's 3.6-liter flat-6; its 320 bhp comes on smooth and linearly from idle to its 7000-rpm redline.

    Like all Porsches, steering feel is nearly telepathic with a slight lightening under acceleration. Braking performance is also typically 911 with a very communicative pedal, good power and excellent modulation. The brakes on our test Targa feel a little softer than on other 911s we've driven, though braking distances are not adversely affected. Fade is a non-issue and directional control under braking is the most stable of our group.

    Given its considerably steeper price tag, finding where the money goes is a case of looking in a lot of small places rather than a couple of big ones. Interior appointments are on a similar level to the M3's and considerably more elegant than in the 350Z or Corvette. Fit and finish also appear just a touch better than in the value twins, as does overall build quality. And then there's the Targa top that costs an extra $7000 over the standard 911 coupe. But add it all up and there's still a huge difference that can be justified only by the simple fact that the 911 is a Porsche. Purchasing a 911 not only buys you a car, but a small slice of automotive history mixed with ample quantities of performance and prestige.

    [​IMG] Factor: Porsche 911 Targa

    [​IMG]

    • As with the Corvette, driving the 911 takes patience and a period of adjustment. Once mastered, there are few cars as satisfying to drive quickly. The Z suffers from no such waiting period, as it's instantly easy to drive near its limits.
    • Its interior may not be nearly as plush as the Porsche's, but for enthusiastic driving, the 350Z's well-bolstered seats, rifle-bolt shifter and idiot-proof handling take the thinking out of logging some fast miles.
    • Logging longer, faster miles are right up the 911's alley, where a pleasing driving environment is of greatest importance. Over time, the Z's choppy highway ride and droning engine are no match for the Porsche's proven long-haul credentials.
    • If you can afford a 911, odds are good you're not shopping for a Z. But if you are, it's amusing to know you can own a car with nearly the performance of a high-dollar Porsche for about half the cost.

    Bottom Line: Very different cars for very different buyers, but given their respective audiences, each delivers the goods.

    Final Thoughts

    Our Z Factor notes reveal that the 350Z gives away very little performance relative to its more costly competitors. What's not shown in the numbers is the overall ease with which the Z can be driven. Thanks to a willing engine and capable chassis, the 350Z makes it possible for impressive levels of performance to be accessed with minimal fuss.

    Z buyers probably won't cross-shop M3s or 911s, but at least they can feel confident in knowing they're paying way less and still getting a whole lot for their money. As for buyers of these more expensive sports cars? It's hard not to respect Nissan's accomplishment, but they're probably fine with spending the extra cash for the added refinement their particular cars possess.

    As with the original 240Z, this newest incarnation is as affordable today as its predecessor was back in 1970. Costing around $35,000 with all the bells and whistles, the 350Z represents a serious sports-car value. Not only does it offer performance rivaling cars costing thousands more, but also it signals the arrival of a capable new contender in a market that can always use a fresh face. Is it as good as its more costly counterparts? In some ways yes, in some ways no. When we assigned a "performance per dollar" value to the cars, it was the venerable Corvette that took top honors, not the Nissan. But regardless of how you look at it, the 350Z is clearly car enough to put up a good fight no matter who the challenger is.

    The Z Factor

    [​IMG]

    We derived a way to compare Performance Per Dollar of our varied group, in a sense another Z-Factor: In the expression:

    (A x B x SL x SK x L) ⁄ √P

    and P, price, are normalized on 10-point scales. The final values are normalized as well so the cars can be rated on a 10-point scale, 10 being best.

    Putting it all together,

    Nissan 350Z Track

    Price - $34,688
    0-60 mph - 5.8 sec.
    0-1/4 mile - 14.4 sec.
    Lap time - 01:40.06
    Skidpad - 0.88g
    Slalom - 67.3 mph
    Braking, 80-0 mph - 213 ft.

    BMW M3 SMG II

    Price - $55,695
    0-60 mph - 4.9 sec.
    0-1/4 mile - 13.5 sec.
    Lap time - 01:40.09
    Skidpad - 0.89g
    Slalom - 68.8 mph
    Braking, 80-0 mph - 213 ft.

    Chevrolet Corvette Z06

    Price - $51,450
    0-60 mph - 4.5 sec.
    0-1/4 mile - 12.8 sec.
    Lap time - 01:36.50
    Skidpad - 0.98g
    Slalom - 67.6 mph
    Braking, 80-0 mph - 204 ft.

    Porsche 911 Targa
    Price - $84,975
    0-60 mph - 5.0 sec.
    0-1/4 mile - 13.5 sec
    Lap time - 01:40.79
    Skidpad - 0.92g
    Slalom - 65.5 mph
    Braking, 80-0 mph - 208 ft.

    Performance Per Dollar,

    Nissan 350Z Track - 7.8

    BMW M3 SMG II - 7.6

    Chevrolet Corvette Z06 - 10

    Porsche 911 Targa - 6.1

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Urinal Mint

    Urinal Mint bourbon afficionado

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    I think that pretty much proves that the Corvette Z06 is the baddest sports car on the road for the money. :cool:
     
  3. ZAQ786

    ZAQ786 BMW: The reason Lexus is still 'In the pursuit of

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    M3s 13.5 1/4 is compelete BS.
     
  4. pixel804

    pixel804 yabba dabba do

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  5. mucky

    mucky .

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    Damn...All of them are nice cars, but all different perspective in a sports coupe/car.
     
  6. tun

    tun Active Member

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    Only for people that can afford it...
     
  7. DMClark

    DMClark Active Member

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  8. ZAQ786

    ZAQ786 BMW: The reason Lexus is still 'In the pursuit of

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    M3>911>Zo6>350
     
  9. vodkamattvt

    vodkamattvt Guest

    z06 > *
     
  10. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    :werd:

    This is a cool comparo, figuring out if the premiums paid over the 350Z really buys you more real performance or not.
     
  11. Corvettes4Life

    Corvettes4Life New Member

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    correct :bigthumb:
     
  12. tun

    tun Active Member

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    None of it is. Just buy a Base or Enthusiast model for about 30,000 or less and do your own mods.
     
  13. Rummy

    Rummy "bored and extremely dangerous"

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    if I was up your ass you'd know where I was
    Z 0 6
     
  14. HisXLNC

    HisXLNC ๑۩۞۩๑ Hot ๑۩۞۩๑

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    350Z is hot.
     
  15. vudoodoodoo

    vudoodoodoo Guest

    I'll take the 911 or M3.
     
  16. KenKaniff

    KenKaniff Guest

    ibaMILLIONPAGES


    i'd still take an m3.
     
  17. Read more...

    Read more... SPQR

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    funny....I'd still

    911>M3>Vette>350z
     
  18. dmora

    dmora Guest

    Hmm, seems like they hit on the very point ive made about the 350z and the vette.
    Crappy interiors ;)

    But i will agree, that the z06 > *.NewCars
     
  19. HisXLNC

    HisXLNC ๑۩۞۩๑ Hot ๑۩۞۩๑

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    Thats because all you care about is penis power!
     
  20. Read more...

    Read more... SPQR

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    Actually it's pure pussy power...
     
  21. antihero

    antihero OT Supporter

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    lol... the m3 and the 911 just got embaressed man. I mean we all know most of the lower end 911's are all show no go, but the m3 should be ashamed of itself.
     
  22. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    Isn't this a major :repost:

    :o

    This just proves that the Z06 is awesome, and that the 350Z is a 14-second car.
     
  23. HisXLNC

    HisXLNC ๑۩۞۩๑ Hot ๑۩۞۩๑

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    Where is Ford?Probably fixing all the recalls.
    :fawk:
     
  24. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    Hey, they couldn't review every single car.
     
  25. HisXLNC

    HisXLNC ๑۩۞۩๑ Hot ๑۩۞۩๑

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    True.They just reviewed the best.
    :big grin:
     

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