Questions!!

Discussion in 'That'll Buff Right Out' started by StuDLei, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    I finally started using my Flex today. Some of you may remember my previous thread from about a month ago but probably not. Anyways, now that I just started to use it I have some questions.

    How often do I need to clean the pads?? If I let them sit for an hour will I be okay? The reason I ask this is because I just practiced on my dads car and now I want to wait until the sun comes out a little bit more so I can finally work on my black 350z.

    I only got the CCS red and orange pads in my kit. Orange is light cutting and red is final polish pad or whatever. I used the orange pad with meguiars 105 on my dads car and was astonished with what it did on the hood of his '89 LeSabre.

    I want to start with something lighter on my own car for obvious reasons and as reccommend by all the pros in this forum. My question is is it even worth using 105 or 205 with a red pad? My understanding is that it has no cut at all.

    Crap, I know I had some more questions but I can't think of them.

    Again, I was amazed at my results and can't wait to see what I can do on my black 350.

    After the pads have been primed how much product should I use per 2x2ft area? I've been putting 3 little dots of product on the pad.

    I had a little bit of marring while polishing the hood and I think it might have been because I was using too much product..could this be the case? The only way I got rid of it was by aggressively rubbing it by hand. Any advice for this scenario?
     
  2. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Watch the vids Scottwax has posted about proper DA and Rotary technique, that should give you an idea of how much product you need to use.

    The reason you had marring on that hood is that 105 with the Orange pad is actually a quite aggressive combo... you'll need to follow it up with 205, preferably on a white polishing pad to remove that marring.

    And that brings me to the next point.... you don't have anywhere near enough, or the right pads in your arsenal just yet. You really do need to have at least a couple of the white CCS pads or yellow Meguiar's pads for use with 105 and 205. Starting off with 105/orange is beyond what I would usually recommend unless you have prior knowledge of the vehicle you're working on to know its paint is hard enough to require that combo. Just like learning to shoot, you start off with a .22lr before jumping to a .357Mag.

    And the pads will be fine if you leave them sitting for a bit.... just put them in a ziploc bag between uses so they don't dry out. I keep two sets of pads so that every time I finish a full detail with one set, I wash them and use the other set while they dry. That could be overkill if you are working on cars that aren't that bad, but since I usually get cars where I'm pulling a lot of oxidation and contaminants out of the paint they get encrusted with gunk rather quickly.
     
  3. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Hm... I know the orange pad is somewhat aggressive. I actually started with the red pad and the 205 and it didn't help much so I went straight to the orange/105. It was on a really old car that I wasn't worried about screwing up, so I just went for it. I went over it again with red/205 and then topped it with opti-seal. The results were incredible. Couldn't believe how easy it was either.

    I'm kind of in a tough position because I dont have a "medium" pad. At the time of ordering I didn't realize I'd need a white pad. The orange pad I'm using is classified as a "light cutting" pad. The yellow CCS is the regular/heavy cut. Not sure if you have that confused because maybe Meguiars pads are the opposites as far as cut goes?

    Either way my problem is the car needs to be done(my 350z) before winter rolls in here. Can I pick up a decent medium pad at any local stores? Or should I just go ahead with the combo I used on the "old" car? Or should I just wait??- that I don't really want to do. Tommorow if the weather is nice I will try the red/205 on the Z buts its got quite a bit of light scratches/swirls in it that I think it will need the compound/cut.

    Any advice?
     
  4. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009
  5. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Rule #1 with pads: There is no industry standard for pad cut by color. Go by what the company says the cut is and not what color the pad is.

    The yellow Meguiars polishing pad is an excellent product and the 7" pad is machine washable.
     
  6. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Thanks for the input.

    Scottwax, I know you're probably irritated for having to repeat things like that over and over. I remember and I know that. Basically I'm just in a rush because I live in Nebraska and I'm at my parents house and planned on detailing my car with this kit I bought. I bought a few things along with it and had some things already, but the one thing I didn't get was more pads.

    Here is the kit I actually bought:

    http://www.autogeek.net/flex-meguiars-polish-kit.html

    I guess I figured it would come with pretty much what I needed to take care of my care. According to what this webpage says I should use the 105 with the light cutting pad then the 205 with the gray pad. I used the red with the 205 today and even though from your charts its says it has no cut and is to be used for applying waxes/sealants I actually got great results today. Tommorow I will use the gray pads as well, like the website/package suggests.

    My question to you guys does this sound like something that would work in your opinion? Would I perhaps get better results with and actual polishing pad instead?

    Chances are if the weather is nice enough tommorow I'm just going to go ahead and go for it. I've been waiting a long time to polish my car and based on the results I got today on my fathers old Buick I think I should be okay. I guess I'm just looking for some reassurance/advice from you guys- the pros.
     
  7. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    It would absolutely do better using the right pad/product combination. I'm not going to say that the 105/Orange pad will 100% certainly be too aggressive (you might actually find you need it, but DO NOT start right off with it until you've seen how a less aggressive combo reacts first -- and don't jump right from 205/red to 105/orange as there are a number of levels of aggressiveness between the two), but I will say that you're taking a risk by starting off with that 105/orange combo on a vehicle you've never polished before.

    The BIGGEST mistake you can make is to get into a huge rush just because you've got a new toy to play with. You have to remember that when you're polishing a car, especially with the goal of correcting defects using aggressive compounds/polishes/pads/buffers, you're removing an amount of paint from the vehicle. Once that paint is gone, it's not coming back without a potentially costly repaint if you remove too much.

    As a newcomer to machine polishing, it would behoove you to be a bit less comfortable just tearing into a vehicle without fully understanding what you're doing. Not saying you're dumb, just inexperienced. Granted the machine you're using does have a bit of a safeguard in that it isn't a full-on rotary, but I watched a friend burn through the paint on a newer Buick using his Flex DA (he and I both have/use them, but he has much less experience with a buffer than I do) by jumping the gun and grabbing 105 and a Meguiar's Cutting Pad (maroon... about the equivalent to an LC CCS Orange) before trying anything less aggressive. So be mindful, it CAN happen just that fast.

    The take away point here is that it's your car and you can handle it however you'd like, but are you SURE you want to take a risk? Different cars and different paints can and do react differently to the same exact pad/product combo, so what worked on your dad's car might fuck yours up, or to the contrary might not be aggressive enough for the defects you want to correct.... but you have to follow proper procedures in order to safely find that out, at least until you've got some experience under your belt and can better determine what process to start with in a given situation.

    {NOTE: I'm not here to be an elitist or discourage anyone from learning to take care of their own vehicles, but it is my belief that noobs who may be under-equipped and overconfident should have the fear of God put into them about the potential to cause damage due to non-purposeful negligence.}
     
  8. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Well put. I see exactly what you're saying and if I was in your shoes I might be saying the same thing. Most people these days are fucking idiots, I'd like to consider myself a man of common sense. In any case, I will for sure try the weaker polishes and pads and gradually step down to first the 105 and then step up to the orange pad. I'll try to find a true polishing pad tommorow first as well. I wish I had gotten a couple green and white CCS pads. I have to admit, after using this stuff today combined with everything I've been reading for a long time I'm pretty confident only a complete tool bag could fuck the paint up. I said I'm in a rush and I am, but in actuality I've been preparing for this for a long time(then why don't have white/green pads I know I know:fawk:) Hopefully I remember to take some pics tommorow and hopefully I don't burn my paint. I've put off doing this partially because of fear for a long time. Its go time.
     
  9. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    And for the record, I never planned on starting with 105/orange;) I don't think I was ever clear on that but I learned that much a long time ago- thanks to this forum.

    Thanks again :cheers:
     
  10. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Just did another hour of reading/ research. There's a couple guys over at Autopia that used Meg's 105 with Orange LC followed by Meg's 205 with black LC pads and the results were phenomenal. I can get to sleep a little easier now. Hopefully the sun is out tommorow.

    PS I'm still going to start with the mildest products:fawk:
     
  11. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Well for whoever is interested-

    I started working on the 350z today. I'm having a tough time.

    So far I washed with ONR and clayed at the same time. It really didn't need the clay as I've done it quite a few times in the past, but what the hell I just did it again.

    Then I stared to assess where I'm at. The paint wasn't really as badly swirled as I had originally thought. I started with a black LC pad and 205... Didn't notice a whole too much difference...so I tried that pad with 105... really about the same. So I stepped up to the orange pad. That seemed to take out a little bit of the swirls but definately not all of them. One problem I'm having is just trying to see the paint. THis black paint is next to impossible. I've spent 3/4 of the time just looking at it from different angles. I'm really just at a loss as to what to do. Yesterday I had such an easy time on my father's car and was hoping for the same today to no avail.
    So I don't know what I'm going to do. Probably just end up going over the car with the black pad and 205..which might not do much but put some oils in the paint a little bit. I might just end up applying the opti seal and getting the windows squeaky clean and rain-xing them before winter here.

    I did go over my headlights with some 105 and the orange pad...wow they came out looking great. It put some swirls in there that I can't get out with the 205 and black pad...but they definately look 100 times better than before, so I'm happy with that at least.
     
  12. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Yes, I need polishing pads lulz
     
  13. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Told you so :fawk:

    One thing you probably should note though, once you do get your hands on the right pads: when it comes to stepping up the aggressiveness of your polishing, remember that you should generally follow the "pad first, product second" philosophy. Meaning if you start with 205 on a finishing and/or polishing pad, keep using it and step all the way up to 205 on a cutting pad before moving to 105 on a less aggressive pad. Once you've found the right combination and taken care of your defects, then you can step back down to 205 on a finishing pad before applying your LSP.

    And if you're having trouble seeing the defects in your paint, you'll want to pick up some halogen work lights or a Xenon swirl-finder light to make it easier on you. Something like the following:

    http://www.autogeek.net/brinkmann-swirl-finder-light.html

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_... Lights&psid=FROOGLE01&sid=IDx20070921x00003a
     
  14. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Shit man, I did a few more spots with 105/orange followed by 205/black. They look fine...still some minor swirls. I spent so much of the day trying stuff out that I'm running out of sunlight. Next time I do this I'm going to use work lamps. I think it'll be easier and I can aim it wherever I want. My paint really isn't too too bad as is. So I left it and went over it with opti seal. I came in for a break real quick and I still have to rain x the windows and clean up the interior a little bit. Just wanted to see if anyone had responded.
    Come spring, Ill get some more pads and some lights and have at it again. I was really impressed with what I was able to achieve on my dads car and on my lights, so I know with a little more patience and experience I can do better on my own paint.
     
  15. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Helpful hint-Opti-Seal the glass.
     
  16. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    I tell you what man, glass is such a pain in the ass. I need to get in the habit of cleaning it once a month. A wait too long in between cleans and end up having to go over it 3 times and still have problem with smears. I use Stoners and newspaper.

    I really liked the opti seal. Goes on as easy as the optimum wax...not sure why I'd ever use the wax again as they go on just as easy as eachother and the opti-seal last longer. Any advice here?

    Overall my car came out looking great. Come spring I'll get some work lamps and a few more different pads and give it another go. I'm really happy with how my lights/hood came out. The lights on my car were really starting to look like shit and made the car looked aged/uncared for.

    I didn't know you could use opti-seal on glass. I ran out of sunlight so I didn't rain-x and if IRC you (Scottwax) said Stoners works almost as well by itself. I'll opti-seal the glass next time.

    I took some pics but it's going to be a couple days before I can post them. I took them on my mom's camera. I told her to email them to me so I can put them up. Maybe I'll take some pics of the whole car tommorow as I only took a before and after of the hatch lid today.
     
  17. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Microfiber is your best friend on glass, much better than newspaper. I use Clearkote's Quikshine on glass, not Stoners.

    Try using OCW over Opti-Seal. Not sure which version you have (the new version has the new label that has the motto "accelerate into the future") but the new version over Opti-Seal adds depth, wetness and slickness. They compliment each other very well.
     
  18. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Huh, I always start with microfiber on glass and end up using newspaper.... toughest place is the inside of the front and rear windshields. Next to impossible to get the rear glass on my Z.
     
  19. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    http://www.autogeek.net/glass-master-pro.html

    That's what you need. Makes cleaning glass MUCH easier. Note that there's a different style of MF material for use on glass, does better than the towels you use on your paint.

    And yeah, Stoner's SUCKS for me. I much prefer Eagle One 20/20.
     
  20. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    I bought optimums glass towel but I've never used it. I couldn't remember if you were just supposed to use water or not. Anyone used it before?
     
  21. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Thought about buying that, but I had over 500 already invested....had to stop and some point:rofl:
     
  22. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Pffft.... $500 is nothing. I've almost lost track of how many thousands of dollars worth of tools and product I've bought; but then again I do make money with it.
     
  23. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    Exactly.

    I'd like to get to that point someday myself, we'll see.

    I took my car to the carwash tonight..the doityourselfer. Wanted to see it under some different lights/ see how the opti-seal beads. It's nice that I can put the opti seal on pretty much anything and protect/not have to worry about getting it on trim. I really like that I can put it on my headlights. I compounded/polished the hood and it looks better than the other parts I didn't. Which makes me feel good, like I accomplished something. It's not so blatant it looks stupid though, if you know what I mean. Might try to get on a coat of opti wax here soon.
     
  24. StuDLei

    StuDLei Death before Dishonor

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    BUMP BUMP BUMP*******

    Hey guys, I know I'm bumping a thread that's old as shit, but I thought it might be helpful to whomever responds to have some background info and to know(remember) where I'm coming from.

    My car looks like shit these days. Swirls fucking everywhere. I picked up some new pads (green white, etc) so I am better prepared for this spring. Last year I went over my hood with 105/ orange(light cutting) pad and it didn't seem to do as much as I had hoped for. Which kind of concerns me because I've seen a few black 350z's over on Autopia that were compounded with that combination and came out great. Maybe I was doing something wrong, like not using enough product or not working it in well enought, etc.

    My main point in bumping this thead is to better prepare myself for when I can finally get out and detail my car. I have a few questions.

    The last thing I put on my car was opti seal in november. Do I need to use any type of wax remover before compounding/polishing my car?

    How many times do you think you can typicall compound a vehicle with a product like 105 and a light cutting pad or even a cutting pad? I'm scared as shit about burning paint. AND...I just want anyone who reads this to know that I WILL be starting with the least aggressive product/pad before gradually moving up..first by pad then by product. You guys have drilled this into my head so please, I know yall get sick of lecturing and I'm telling you it doesn't need to be said to be anymore.

    How do you know if you've burned through paint?? Is it obvious??

    I'll make sure to take some pictures this time and I'm sure I have more questions that I just can't remember right now.

    I miss what my car looked like when it was new. The paint looks glorious when it's swirl free and waxed...hopefully I can bring it back soon.
     
  25. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Is your car black? Just because the KBM method works on black Nissan paint (which is definitely on the soft side) doesn't mean it will be as effective on their other colors. You may need to bump up the speed and pressure and move the Flex at 1" per second or so.

    You do not need to strip wax, if polishing will remove swirls, do you really think wax will stand up to that?

    You can probably hit your car pretty good once or twice a year for several years before it affects the life of the clear coat. What you need to do is work on your washing technique so as to minimize swirls in between details. Also, it never hurts to wax as often as possible, no matter how durable whatever you are using is. You want as much of a barrier in between your paint and the outside elements as possible.
     

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