Question for those with their own server...

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Steve Kerr, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Steve Kerr

    Steve Kerr 6 Time NBA Champion OT Supporter

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    Hey guys.

    I have a question for those of you who have their own server. I'm thinking of buying one of those cheap-o Dell SC400 poweredge servers.

    You know the ones you can get for $900 loaded.

    My question is...

    Does it pay to have your own server? Is it really that useful for webhosting etc? And on the subject of webhosting... how much do you pay for bandwidth and how does that work? What's a good compnay?

    Do you find it useful to have a server in your house/small business if you have multiple computers? I think it'd be cool for file/print sharing within my house.

    Anyone have anything to add that I don't know what to ask.
     
  2. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

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    I got my SC400 (2.8GHz w/ HT) for $300 and put a GB of RAM in it for another $150... If you have 512Kb or less upstream, I would say don't bother. Also you need to check your ISP rules, if they say no servers, then they might do checks on port 80 and drop you if they get a response...
     
  3. Steve Kerr

    Steve Kerr 6 Time NBA Champion OT Supporter

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    do you find it useful? what exactly do you use it for?
     
  4. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    Depends on where you are putting the server.

    You can usually squeak a server behind your 'net connection, but I wouldn't consider doing anything professional with it UNLESS you have an SLA that says if your connection goes down, you have every legal right to bend [your ISP] over and rape them. Typical home internet connections have it so if the 'net connection goes down, "to bad".

    On the cable side of things, port 80 tends to be blocked pretty often. You can setup the web server to listen on other ports and thats not a problem. But you can't register a domain name to it though.

    The other option is to colocate the server with an ISP. When you do that, its a free-for-all and the ISP doesn't care what you do (unless you go over your allotted bandwidth and then they get to rape you). Colocating isn't cheap and sometimes you have to provide all sorts of other gear depending on the ISP.

    For tinkering, a simple simple simple box at home will do fine (mine is a Pentium 100!).
     
  5. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

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    I use my machine for gaming and as a PVR and a web server + file server to stream video to my laptop over my wireless network. I don't use my cable modem connection for the web server, except to schedule recordings for my personal use. I use a hosting company for my website.
     
  6. ziggie216

    ziggie216 New Member

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    current i'm using my server has a file server (lan only), httpd (apache), email (qmail), and couple of other stuff that I just play around with. My connection is static dsl so that the only reason I can setup an email server. it's not that u cant, but it would be a bad idea if it was dynamic. Back then I got sick of looking for webhost since all of them are comming out with pop up and banner. So I decide to setup my own. And since it's for my person stuff, very little bandwidth is use. btw.. my upstream is 384kb/s
     
  7. RobsMob

    RobsMob Guest

    I have a win2k server that runs my home network. I have cable, but I only use the server to have central storage/printing...etc. It works for my needs, but a workgroup on a switch with an extra computer would work the same for what I need. :dunno:

    For the record:
    AMD Athlon 1ghz
    512mb PC133 RAM
    Cheap mobo
    40gb WD HDD
    80gb WD HDD
    60gb IBM Deskstar
    20gb WD HDD
     
  8. Steve Kerr

    Steve Kerr 6 Time NBA Champion OT Supporter

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    Thanks a lot everyone!
     
  9. Holiday

    Holiday Switching to Runlevel 0

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    dont waste money if your only buying one server. Colocation for net speed is expensive. Lease a dedicated server from a dedicated host provider. It will cost less and suit you fine, managed or unmanaged. (better unmanaged)
     
  10. Ximian

    Ximian New Member

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    Towers take up lots of place at the colo datacenter, they'll charge you more. If you got a 1U form server, it would save you money in fees. Also, what kind of connection are you looking into getting, 1Mbit, 100? Trfx ( www.trfx.net ) is a pretty good colo host, look at the plans.

    As for me, I run a web server, mail and other things on my 128K upload with dynamic DSL. It's useful, if it wasn't, I wouldn't run it.

    For dynamic DNS, I use ODS ( www.ods.org ) which is $5 per year for a public host name and $20 for a private. It's free for me though since I "work" there. :)
     
  11. SL1200MK4

    SL1200MK4 New Member

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    This really depends on what you need.

    Few warnings to begin with.

    1. if it is for business, say a website for your own business, e-mail...etc. I won't recommand it. A server without proper admin is asking for trouble. You could easily get owned by script kiddies

    2. I also won't recommand a server running Microsoft products. I personally would recoomand Linux/BSD. By running a Microsoft product you are asking for MORE trouble

    3. Even if you do run Linux, or some flavor of BSD. I still won't recommand that you setup your own mail server. It is a pain in the butt to admin it properly

    Now, the advantages of having a personal server.

    1. Provided that you have enough HD space, you can put however many stuff you want to put on the server. It is a lot quicker to update the content. Because you are uploading via LAN, much faster than your internet connection I suppose.

    2. Having your own server allows you to store your file and grab it whenever you want it. (You can do this with VPN as well, but it is a little different, because with your own server you can choose to share some stuff with some other users easier)

    With above points, I assume that you want a server that servers webpage, maybe FTP/SSH and is open to the public.

    Disadvantages:

    1. Your upload speed probably isn't all that fast, so that might be your main bottleneck.

    2. You have to spend time admin the box, which can be difficult for many people.

    p.s. Personally I will NEVER have a server that's open to the outside world server webpage/FTP/SSH...etc. AND be the print server/file server for the LAN at the same time. Personally they don't mix.

    If the some files on the file server needs to be avaliable to the public. I would probably settle for a DMZ pinhole to the LAN and have the server in DMZ rsync to the file server on LAN.
     
  12. Ximian

    Ximian New Member

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    Keep up with the patches and remove the default CGI (etc) scripts and you should be fine unless you do something bad. Never run any services you don't need and you definitely shouldn't host a company web site at home.
     

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