MIL Question for recruiters

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Alexqzilla, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. Alexqzilla

    Alexqzilla New Member

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    Is it true that if I am prescribed Concerta, I will be ineligible to join the Navy? Are there people in the Navy who have ADHD and are taking medication for it?
     
  2. dmcgill

    dmcgill New Member

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    from what i know, ADHD is a disqualifying disorder. meds or not.
     
  3. Alexqzilla

    Alexqzilla New Member

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    What about people who are already enlisted and are then diagnosed? Are they discharged?
     
  4. dmcgill

    dmcgill New Member

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    isn't that a disorder that is developed from an early age?

    but if so, yes they would be.
     
  5. DawnsKayBug

    DawnsKayBug New Member

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    I have a "friend" who has add he didnt answer his recruiter. he thought he asked if he had ABD not ADD... Why dont you ask a recruiter not the internet
     
  6. SofaKingKong

    SofaKingKong New Member

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    Under the old standards, any history of ADD or ADHD was disqualifying. While waivers were sometimes possible, they were among the hardest categories of waivers to get approved. Under the new standards, ADD/ADHD is disqualifying only if the applicant has been treated with ADD/ADHD medication within the previous year and/or they display signs of ADD/ADHD. For applicants with a previous history of ADD/ADHD who have been off medication for more than one year, and they do no demonstrate significant impulsivity or inattention during MEPS processing, the MEPS examining official may find them qualified for military service without submission of a waiver.

    Records review is still required. Any history of being evaluated or treated for ADD/ADHD must be documented. As a minimum, all treatment (if any) within the previous three years must be submitted to MEPS, in advance, as part of the medical pre-screening. Full medical records are required if the applicant was ever treated for ADD or ADHD with any medication other than Ritalin, Adderal, or Dexedrine, or if there were any additional psychiatric symptoms, such as, but not limited to, depression. MEPS may require school transcripts to demonstrate acceptable academic performance for the year without medication. If treatment for ADD/ADHD occurred throughout the school environment, but wasn’t stopped until after the applicant left school, there is still the possibility of waiver consideration.
     

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