Question about weight training for the elderly.

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by romostud22, Jan 19, 2010.

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  1. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    So my pops is turning sixty tomorrow, and my mom is almost sixty as well. They are both overweight... My dad has diabetes and my mom has a weaker heart. My sister is a chubbster as well...but I have her doing the "New Rules of Lifting for Women" book.

    [​IMG]
    Picture of the family including me about a year ago.

    That being said I really really want my parents to get slim and healthy. I don't want them to die early...I love these guys. So I was thinking for my mom: A three days a week light cardio. 30 minutes a day and then the swimming pool for 30 minutes after. I think that, coupled with a change in diet will help her alot.

    My father is the main reason for this thread... He wants to lift weights... but he has a tear in his left bicep tendon thing..so he can't go heavy or anything... I was thinking of starting him on a super light lifting routine. What do you guys think of this for my pops:

    Monday- Chest/Tris
    Tuesday- Legs/Abs/light cardio 30 minutes
    Wednesday- off
    Thursday- Back/Bis/light cardio 30 minutes
    Friday- Shoulders/Tris/Abs
    Sat/Sunday- light cardio 30 minutes

    Please let me know any info you guys could give me. Please.
    I searched online for info but just found some Men's Healthy routine which was basically something that I don't think my pops could do.
    If you guys have any books you could point me towards...that would be much appreciated as well..

    Cliffs: parents are overweight, need help on finding a good routine for them. they are old.
     
  2. jeffreyliu838

    jeffreyliu838 New Member

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    If your mom has heart problems and your dad has a torn muscle, they should consult doctors before doing any exercise that would stress their respective ailments.
     
  3. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    Doctor recommended "light cardio" five days a week for my mom...but that's too much for her at a time..

    And for my pops...the doc recommended strength bands for his bicep. He said everything else is good to go. So for arms day I was gonna have him do some resistance band training for biceps.
     
  4. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    There has been a lot of research in resistance training for the elderly.

    Loss of strength is the number one cause of disability associated with aging.

    You however have no expertise in the area and therefore you should seek advice from those with knowledge in the area. In Australia, there are exercise physiologists who specialise in training the elderly, try and seek the equivalent professional in the US.

    http://www.acsm.org/AM/Template.cfm...emplate=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=8650

    The ACSM guidelines are something I would follow if training your parents.


    In all seriousness, I would focus your attention on your sister and let someone else worry about your parents.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2010
  5. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    she is número 1 on the list. She's down 15lbs in 1 month and two weeks. So I'm working very hard with her.

    Where do you recommend I look for a specialist? Ask the doctor for a recommendation?
     
  6. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    Get your Mum walking, 30 minutes a day of accumulated moderate intensity physical activity. If she can manage that, think about incorporating some basic resistance training. Squats, or a modified version of, etc.
     
  7. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    Yep ask the doctor for an acsm certified specialist

    or look one up yourself

    http://forms.acsm.org/_frm/crt/online_locator.asp

    I don't know about over there, but here our public healthcare system will pay for a minimum number of free sessions. Perhaps your health insurance will cover it.
     
  8. Bodhi

    Bodhi My crotch is red .. my lambos blue .. and ill be g

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    my dad's a type 1 diabetic .. used to run 2 miles every morning with him when i was a kid .. watch his sugar level even out when he starts exercising .. it does wonders man .. even an early morning walk for 1-2 miles does some good .. my old man doesn't exercise at all anymore and he's in his mid 60s .. it shows when he does a blood check ..

    good luck to them bro .. keep on em
     
  9. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    Yep, exercise will do wonders for type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    The drug trial of metformin is one study in particular that highlighted the efficacy of exercise in the management of t2dm.
     
  10. Spur

    Spur Boomer

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    1st, congrats on being concerned about the future of your parents physical health (I'm waiting til mine retire). The earlier they start, the better their remaining years will be.

    2nd, I agree with Peal. ACSM seems to have the best material/guidelines on the elderly populations.

    3rd, the primary goal right now would be fat loss to a healthy weight. It's going to get exponentially more difficult as they age. In regards to weight training, focus on functional strength and ROM. A lot of injuries to the elderly happen because they lose ROM, make shorter movements and lose their balance. And when I say functional strength, I mean light squats and lunges, not leg extensions/curls. Specificity is key.
     
  11. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    3rd point is a great one.
     
  12. knight42

    knight42 OT Supporter

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    definately only start out with daily walks. Once they get up to a point that they can do some sort of resistance program I think an easy full body routine for functional strength is better then the typical body building splits people post.

    Just remember to take it really slow and dont let them over extend themselves.
     
  13. tbizzle

    tbizzle you smoke that shit?

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    do you guys look that sad in all of your family photos?
     
  14. LuciferBowels

    LuciferBowels New Member

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    Old people should lift weights to prevent osteoporosis, especially if they are overweight.
     
  15. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    ahh yes. Perfect. Thank you, this is kind of what I was looking for. I need to sit down and speak with a specialist and see what they have to say.
     
  16. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    hmm. point taken. maybe i'll have both my parents do a walk in the morning for thirty minutes. just a light moderate walk before breakfast?
     
  17. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    Thank you. Point taken.
     
  18. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    Nah, just the ones I post online ;)
     
  19. eljefedetonto

    eljefedetonto OT Supporter

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    romanian = super serious
     
  20. Uglybob69

    Uglybob69 I miss beer.

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    as much as the ACSM gets on my nerves they have a lot of specialized training for elderly populations.
     
  21. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    Hmm... I'll definitely check it out. Thanks for input brother.
     
  22. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    You can get away with deadshit personal trainers with general populations, but when training a high risk population, eg. elderly with some form of cardiovascular complication; I'd want someone with half a clue.
     
  23. jeffreyliu838

    jeffreyliu838 New Member

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    If doctors have cleared them for cardio, I'd do walks and stuff. If you can get equipment, an elliptical would be great. They're easy on the knees but they still get your heart and lungs working.
     
  24. romostud22

    romostud22 New Member

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    This sounds like the way to go. Thank you so much Peal, I really appreciate your help in this matter. I'll post results and what I find out after talking with a specialist.

    Hmm, that sounds like a possibility. Thank you!
     
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