GUN Question about competative shooting v.noob

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Rip The Jacker, May 30, 2009.

  1. Rip The Jacker

    Rip The Jacker New Member

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    Havent shot a handgun much, but how soon should I get into competitive shooting? I dont want to be competitive, I just want to make myself better. Should I start ASAP or get more range time under my belt first?

    Looks like USPCA is available in my area, what do I need to compete in that?

    Any other info for someone to get into this stuff? Lets make this as informative as possible :x:
     
  2. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    One thing I hear from my new shooters all of the time is:

    "I'm not ready yet, I should get some practice..."

    Oh yeah, what/how are you practicing? 99% of folks won't even know what to practice. It's like saying you are practicing to have sex for the first time. You won't know until you do it.

    Most important things you need:

    - Time
    - Dedication to getting better
    - Commitment to go out there every time it's possible
     
  3. Is the USPCA like the ASPCA?

    Seriously though, just get out there and do it. As long as you are safe that's all you need to get started.
     
  4. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    My advise:

    Shoot what you already have, you'll have plenty of time later to buy what you really need.

    Most common issues with getting started are obtaining the following:

    - Good holster. I would highly recommend kydex.
    - Magazine pouches and magazines. You can play it either way. If you can afford to get 4 pouches and 5 magazines. Go with production division. You will be most productive here as a new shooter. If you only have 3 magazines, and 2 mag pouches. Shoot your gun in Limited/minor.

    What I'm trying to accomplish here is giving yourself enough ammo to finish a field course. Most events will have 1 or 2 big field courses that could require 32 rounds. Doesn't sound like alot but you will need to do speed reloads from position to position. In Limited, you can load your magazine to full capacity.

    As for ammo, I usually bring 200 in my bag, and 100 in my back up range bag in the car.

    I wrote a big EDU on competitive shooting here some time ago, don't know if anyone else can find it.
     
  5. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    You will lose badly the first time out, likely regardless of how much time you shoot at the local range. This is almost a certainty. USPSA is run and gun stuff, and is hard because it takes skillsets in a whole bunch of areas. Being able to shoot fist sized groups at 10 yards will pretty much translate to dick in that arena.


    Point is...... Go shooting now. Focus on SAFETY. Reads Yar's primer - it's good. No one will care if you are new and slow, and don't know what you are doing. If you are a likeable guy (or have money/booze/hookers/ammo to offer), people might even be kind enough to help you out. Everyone, on the other hand, cares about someone doing unsafe shit. DQ's happen, but if I were you I would focus more on that, than on my score.


    You can pretty much compete in USPSA with whatever you have. You might get stuck in open class, but if you are just wanting to see what's up that's not a big deal. What you will need is a gun, mags (more the merrier, I'd want at least 4, but I usually show up with 8-10 mags when I'm shooting production, obviously not all on my belt). You will need a belt (the CR Speeds are seriously worth the money), and a holster. Also will want a way to carry magazines, so toss in a couple mag pouches too.

    What kind of pistols you wanting to shoot, or what division are you thinking?
     
  6. Rip The Jacker

    Rip The Jacker New Member

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    Ok well I have a Glock 17, 4 17 round mags, and a blade-tech holster. I just need mag pouches i guess.
     
  7. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    Buy a good belt, probably another G17 mag, and go rock production class.
     
  8. Rip The Jacker

    Rip The Jacker New Member

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    What about my 33rounder? I kid I kid.

    What kind of mag pouches should I look at?
     
  9. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Depends on how committed you think you are.

    I try and avoid being like some guys on other forums and give you a laundry list of the most expensive gear.

    If you can, borrow some pouches until you find it's something you like. then do some homework and find out what you really want. Trust me, there's plenty of time. When you are at the match, observe what everyone else is shooting, ask questions, lots of questions, then decide for yourself.

    If you want to go cheap, get 2 dual pouch Blade Tech pouches. They usually go for 19.99 each. You'll need 2 so you can put 4 magazines on your belt. Tec Loks are what I would suggest for hanger solutions for the pouches.
     
  10. Rip The Jacker

    Rip The Jacker New Member

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    I'd rather spend more money on better gear, I know I'll be doing some handgun and carbine courses so I dont want to skimp.
     
  11. Radicus

    Radicus OT Supporter

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    As far as practice I think the thing that helped me in IDPA the most was double-taps. idk how similar USPCA is to IDPA but nobody else in my beginner course had learned double-taps. That in itself set me above the rest of the class by a large margin.
     
  12. Rip The Jacker

    Rip The Jacker New Member

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  13. spankaveli

    spankaveli OT Supporter

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  14. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    I shoot both. In IDPA, the guys that win, do so by picking up all available points, in the most efficient manner. It's not hard for a steady eddy shooter to beat a fast shooter. There's an older gentleman (70's) I shoot with that's a retired Naval officer and he's not very fast, but he's smooth and get's his points. I'm pretty quick, but when that all falls over, which it does, he mops the floor with me, and I don't even feel bad.

    In IDPA, transitions are even more important then splits. Fast transitions, learning shoot on the move in all directions and getting all your points and you will win matches.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2009

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