Protection against Tree Sap

Discussion in 'That'll Buff Right Out' started by warden, May 3, 2005.

  1. warden

    warden New Member

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    Greetings folks,
    Are there any products out there that offer protection against tree sap?
    I'd assume it would be some product either mixed with the final polish, or a final layer in itself. Anybody found anything that offers this kind of protection?

    Cheers
    Warden
     
  2. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    A good wax or sealant will help protect the paint (see product and product review stickys) but the best protection is to not park under trees and to wash as soon as possible if you don't have a choice and end up with sap on your paint.
     
  3. exceldetail

    exceldetail New Member

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    Start with a quality detail, and maintain frequent mini details to keep your surface slick. Debris adhesion is your paints worst enemy, well, and U.V's.
     
  4. NorthPac

    NorthPac New Member

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    Sap specially conifers contains turpentine and turpentine is used chiefly as a solvent and drying agent in paints and varnishes. To remove large sap amounts use mineral spirits or paint thinner, citrus cleaner best to let the "cleaners soak", BEST NOT to rub off but to gentle wipe rinse off. On small size sap use a clay bar. Best to remove sap ASAP because once it dries it hardens.

    May not be Sap but could be honeydew. As aphid or scale insects feed on trees, honeydew is excreted as a transparent syrup which later stains black from sooty mold fungus.

    Sense it's spring it could be Artillery fungus?
    The artillery fungus is a white-rotting, wood-decay fungus that likes to live on moist landscape mulch. Artillery fungus can generate up to 1/10,000 of a horsepower when expelling these spores and leaves black spots on white cars. The spore of the artillery fungus stick like super-glue.

     

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