A&P PP these for a free signed and numbered art print

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Stevie DV, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    I have taken an amature picture of my two paintings that are going to made into run prints. If someone is able to PP these I would be soo grateful.. The originals need cropping as well. PM me your email and I can send you the original files.

    For those whos pictures I use I will send you a print of each. One of which is a giclee print.

    Thanks again

    Stevie DV

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Bloke

    Bloke Banned

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    it doesnt look like the camera was perfectly perpendicular to the painting. also they look very soft.
     
  3. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    I am taking it with a sony digi camera and do not own a tripod...let me try again
     
  4. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    how about these?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I used a level, not as good as a tripod, but oh well. Crop into the painting a little if you have to
     
  5. Asherman

    Asherman New Member

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    Help. I can't figure out how to get a photo to appear here from Flickr. I copy the address there, click "insert image" here, and get a box with nada. Anyway here are Steve's two paintings rotated, cropped, and with a very slight adjustment to contrast/light levels. With art work minimal PP is necessary, unless you have the original in front of you for color corrections. The painter's eye and vision aren't the same as those who see his work; close perhaps, but the artist is in a continual struggle to translate inner vision into a form acceptable to his audience whose own inner aesthetic may be quite different. Be careful with PP.

    I've overlaid some lines over the two images to demonstrate my comments.

    These images are very symetrical, and therefore very static. The diagonal grid lines converge on the dead center of the viewing area, and that's where the eye will naturally go... and get caught. Asymetrical compositions, though those need to be balanced, are visually more interesting and the viewer's eye can be drawn from one element to another by the skillful artist.

    The Golden section points (there are four for any rectangular surface) are almost as powerful as the dead center, but they are dynamic because the eye moves from one to the next in a regular pattern.We are conditioned to move our eyes over a surface in a "Z" pattern. Upper left to Upper right, then down to lower left and back to lower right. When nothing is happening at these points, and all of the compositional lines lead to the center of the viewing area, you get "dead". This is a weakness, Steve that appears in a number of your works we've seen here. I'd suggest that you work to create more interesting compositions.

    The backgrounds, as I've noted before tend to be slap-dash. They are almost all strictly vertical slashes of color, but if there is a reason for your color choices, it elludes me. The colors are formless and flat, and don't seem realted in anyway to your "main element", your stencile work.

    Your stenciles are your strongest visual element, and they are very strong. It looks like you are using maybe 5 stencils on these, and they are skillfully done. Registration is often a problem for this sort of creation, but you seem to have solved that problem nicely. The subject matter chosen is obviously popular with many younger viewers, but if you are going for the gold, you'll need to step up your game considerably in other areas.

    http:[email protected]/3241999741/

    http:[email protected]/3241999759/
     
  6. xconverge

    xconverge OT Supporter

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    Are these accurate to the originals?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I can bump up the contrast and even the lighting a bit if you want, I just didn't want to steer them to far away from the originals. Let me know what you want, I really want a print and am willing to work a bit for it :big grin:
     
  7. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    Thanks Asherman. Do you suggest a class at the LACMA? I have no training in art and would be willing to take classes to learn new techniques.

    I just went to the art store and will attempt an 11 layer stencil next. I would hate to do it on a sub par background or not create interesting compositions.

    After these prints are made and a few commissions that I have in the works, I will re evaluate what I would like to do and develope an indentifiable style.

    I had attempted to contrast my stencil work with my background to emphasize the stencil. I wanted to give a B&W stencil color, without actually giving it color. I guess this is something I will need to work on. but how? what should I do? I guess I will have to try out new things and see how they work. I hope there is enough time.


    As for these two, I need them made this week. I had presold a lot of these and they are due for mailing
     
  8. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    :bowdown::bowdown:

    I took these in a garage, a dark garage. They look very close to the originals with the exception of some pearl in the second one. Can you PM me your email and I will send you the larger versions so you can do this to them so I can get them printed? You will be paid in prints and will be credited on my blog for the awesome work
     
  9. Perkwunos

    Perkwunos Dog Bones OT Supporter

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    It looks like the lens in that camera is distorting the images too...
     
  10. Asherman

    Asherman New Member

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    You do need training, and classes at LACMA are a pretty good place to start. The fees are very reasonable, and meeting once a week for an hour or so in a class is easy to do. You can read, so hit the local library and find books that can deepen your knowledge and understanding of the problems you face. Above all, look at what is widely considered to be successful art.

    When I say "look at", I mean spend some serious time absorbing how the finest artists of the past have translated their vision onto surfaces. I highly recommend spending at least one full day every week at LACMA, or the two Getty Museums. Being in LA you have three world-class art museums at your fingertips. The paintings and drawings in their collections is so vast that you are unlikely to ever see, really see, more than a fraction of them. As you can tell when I say "see", I mean something a bit different than the ordinary definition of "see".

    Most people spend less than a second looking at a pictoral image. The glance at it, maybe a fraction of a second, and if there isn't something there to grab their interest, they move on to something else. I remember overhearing someone sitting in the patio at LACMA say, "I'm bushed, but I saw everything in the collection today". Yeah, sure they did. Seeing is more than walking past a row of paintings lookinig over your shoulder. To "see" you have to spend time with at least selected works. How big is it? How is it framed? What is the support? The ground? How was the pigment applied, and what sort of medium forumla did the painter use? What are the major and minor elements that appear in the painting? What are the relationships between those elements? How is your eye drawn across the painting surface, and how did the painter manage to manipulate you personally even though the painter may have died a hundred years ago? What and where are the values, the hues, and the relationships between them? What are the historical anticedents of the work? What are the dominent colors? Where is the light source within the painting? How did the artist create an illusion of 3D space on a 2D surface? Is mechanical perspective used, and if so does the painter strictly adhere to its principles? What rhythms and beats utilized in the composition? Is it a story painting, a conceptual work, or does it derive whatever power it has from some other source? If you were to do the picture, what would you do differently?

    As an apprentice in the Datoro-Tonoff Studios years ago back in R.I., I was assigned a painting to look at and analyze. It was a pretty simple modern piece, with only a few elements, and the various fields were deceptively "flat". It took two months before my Master was satisfied that I had drained all the lessons from that single work that I was capable of. I'm not absolutely convinced that was a necessary exercise, but the principle of it is certainly correct. To really see something, you have to zero down your focus and study it very, very closely. From this you learn what works and what doesn't. You learn to be very picky and critical of what you see, and after awhile you will be seeing much more in the world than you did before.

    For those who don't have the advantage of living in a major art center, books and films are a substitute to get started with. There are films/videos of Pablo Picasso and Jackson Polock actually working on various paintings, while talking about their creative process. Watching those a couple of times, or more, is the equivilent of a semester being lectured at by a Professor of Art.

    As your aesthetic judgement and knowledge of "seeing" increases, your skill levels will be challenged. Trying to stretch your skills to cover what your vision demands is something that never ends. Learning what and how to use surface, pigments, media, brushes, etc., is tough. If you can find a studio that will take you on, that is an option that worked pretty well for me. I spent a lot of time watching how canvas is properly stretched, gessoed and prepared for painting while sweeping up and fetching coffee for the Master. When he let me begin to draw for him, I did probably a hundred drawings before letting him critique a single effort. My first painting for him was in one color, and he tore it to shredds. Probably a dozen more were deemed inadequate, but with each effort I became more conscious of and careful of what I was actually doing. Paint, scrap it off and start over. By the time I finished an "acceptable" painting, I had learned enough of the "rules" to know when, where, and how to break them to achieve a particular effect. Any fool can paint a masterpiece once by luck, but a professional works every day in a workman like manner, and over a career will create maybe a dozen exceptional pieces. Each painting should clearly, to you be better than the last. When you start doing the same thing over and over again, its time to move on.

    BTW... the images above by xconverge are probably fine for most purposes. They show the work itself, and nothing else. The colors are, if not exact, close enough for most folks who probably will never see the original. When you take the file to have glice prints made, you can deal directly with the print maker to tweak the image(s). Send the lad prints, but in the future you can do the work yourself with a bit of effort. Take the effort and learn more about how images can be manipulated to achieve an effect.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2009
  11. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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  12. oliver

    oliver New Member

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    :wtf: cliffs :mamoru:
     

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