Power Supply Help

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Chabaz, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Chabaz

    Chabaz OT Supporter

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    Okay...so I bought a power supply big enough to handle my graphics card. But when I got it home - and tried to install it; I found out that it is a 20 pin; and my motherboard is an ATX 24 pin. My old power supply was a 24 pin as well.

    I am still able to fit the 20 pin power connector into the 24 pin slot; but then a message comes up when I start my computer stating 'It is recommended that you disconnect your 20 pin connector - and replace it with a 24 pin connector. It doesn't say it's mandatory - but recommended.

    Well - that got my shaking in my boots - and I didn't want to hit the 'any-key' to see if something would get fried or not.

    I went up to Best Buy and Comp Usa, looking for a 20 to 24 pin converter, but to no avail. I talked to a gentlemen at the geek squad - and he told me that my motherboard could blow - but it might work. I really don't want to drop an extra 20-30 dollars on a newer 24 pin power supply, but I might if I have to.

    Do you guys think that if I just press the any key - and let it go on - that I would have a good chance of my computer being okay, and not frying my motherboard, hard drives, etc.

    All help is greatly appreciated, thank you.
     
  2. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    I believe the extra wires are to supply more current to the board. Trying to pull too much current through too few/too small wires is bad. 24 pin supplies aren't exactly expensive. Most are coming that way today anyway.
     
  3. Chabaz

    Chabaz OT Supporter

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    Really...so what do you think the worst that can happen?

    Woudl you recommend it at all?
     
  4. chips

    chips ...

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    im useing a 20 pin with the 24 pin port, I am pertty sure its for somthing with PCI express
     
  5. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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  6. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Actually it's the pins that can't handle the heat, not the wires. The pins on an ATX connector are rated to 4.5 amps. You can get a converter but that won't really solve the problem since the single 12 volt pin that plugs into the converter is also rated to only 4.5 amps, so if you pull to much power it will still overheat. I'd exchange the PSU for a 24 pin model, especially if you have a recent video card that pulls a lot of power. If you got it from BB or CompUSA you should have x days to return it (30 and 15 I think, check the back of the receipt).

    That being said, Newegg and others do carry 20 to 24 pin converters.
     
  7. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Also, does your PSU have a 4 pin (square) connector as well? This is not the connector that goes into the drives (rectangular molex) but a square (2x2) 4 pin 12v connector. If so, check if it will fit in the ATX connector where pins 21-24 should be. I know some PSUs are designed as 20/24 combos where the 4 pin connector can either go into the ATX power connector on the MB in 24 pin configuration, or into a separate 4 pin aux connector (if the mobo has it) in a 20+4 configuration. Some times the 4 pin connector can actually be snapped onto the end of the 20 pin connector to make a 24 pin connector.
     

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