GUN Police should have to qualify atleast monthly

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by TL1000RSquid, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. TL1000RSquid

    TL1000RSquid ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    I'm sick of hearing this sort of shit 3 cops shot him and hes still breathing WTF

    Armed Huffman man shot by deputies

    By JENNIFER LEAHY
    Copyright 2006 Houston Chronicle

    Three Harris County sheriff's deputies shot and wounded a Huffman man Friday night after he pointed what turned out to be a BB gun at them.

    Brian Murry, 26, was hit by several rounds fired by the deputies when Murry aimed the realistic-looking weapon at another officer.

    Around 7:30 p.m., said Lt. John Martin, "a man said that his brother was cooking methamphetamine in the house and had a gun and that he was scared. The man then hung up. Our dispatcher called the number back but did not receive an answer. The man soon called back and said that he was in the woods behind the house and was dying. The dispatcher could hear him gasping for breath."

    Deputies searched the woods behind the residence and called in a canine unit, but no victim was found.

    About 9:20, Martin said, one of the officers saw a light go on in the garage and heard noises that led him to believe that someone in the garage was loading a weapon. Murry came out, confronted the deputies and raised the BB gun toward them. Deputies then shot him.

    "It appears that the intent was to provoke deputies into shooting him. There are very limited situations in which deadly force is authorized. This is one of them — officers shot to neutralize a threat," Martin said.

    It was later determined that the weapon was a BB gun.

    "Obviously this was in a low-light situation, however, the gun recovered looks just like an actual firearm," said Martin.

    Murry was taken to Ben Taub Hospital where he is listed in stable condition. He has been charged with aggravated assault on a peace officer.

    "This is a very bizarre incident. Murry was the only one at the home the entire time, there was no brother," Martin said.

    Murry was charged with criminal mischief in September. In December 2005 he was charged with making a false report, and in December 2004 he was charged with discharging a firearm.

    The incident remains under investigation, standard practice when deputies discharge their weapons.

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  2. Soybomb

    Soybomb New Member

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    Handguns are just really crappy weapons.
     
  3. Aequitas

    Aequitas If it keeps on raining, levee's going to break.

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    What a douche bag, I'm glad he didn't die. Fuck just wanted someone else to kill him, now he gets to live and face charges.
     
  4. TL1000RSquid

    TL1000RSquid ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    I'd rather he died, guess who gets to foot his medical bill and and pay for his incarceration the tax payers, he's a worthless POS doesnt sound like he'll ever become a usefull member of society.
     
  5. Artyboy

    Artyboy Necessity is the excuse for every infringement of

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    :werd: I'm sick and fucking tired of these idiots that seem to think that we should let criminals live so that they can "be punished properly" and "think about what they did". Way to rationalize things fellas :ugh2:.
     
  6. Gimik

    Gimik New Member

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    This is why we need suicide services. someone wants to die, they check-in and get put to sleep. Doesn't cost a lot of money, and that way no one else gets hurt because someone wants to commit suicide. Shouldn't be a lot of red-tape either.
     
  7. Aequitas

    Aequitas If it keeps on raining, levee's going to break.

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    Taking someone's life can seriously mess someone up. For the sake of the police officers involved I'm glad he didn't die. I'm not saying it's good he now gets to be punished and "think about what he did." I just get irritated with the pussies that can't do it themselves and force someone else to be in a life changing situation.
     
  8. THT

    THT The easy way is always mined

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    I don't know if this is true of all departments but I know of at least two that are not allowed to use hollow point rounds...that may have something to do with it.
     
  9. Bdog

    Bdog ...but do I really care?

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    I qualified years ago with a town in our county. We could carry most anything (I had a USP Compact at that time), but the county was there also and they had S&W Sigma's. Two of the 6 or so deputies couldn't hit anything. They had to stop qualifing and the instructor had to fire their weapons so show them it did actually work if you used some kind of aim. This was at like seven yard using a Q target and they couldn't hit the target. Then one guy kept limp wristing and jamming the gun, and couldn't clear it in time for the next shot, so the instructor had to stop and show him how to shoot the gun. I could see this at a training class in police school, but this was qualification for already working deputies. They qualify once a year here.
     
  10. They use hollow points around here. MD PG 9mm hollow points I think. Don't qoute me.
     
  11. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    http://www.ksn.com/news/local/4494486.htmlTown, friends cope with death of sheriff

    HOXIE, Kansas, Oct 28, 2006 -- He spent his whole life in a Kansas county, eventually given the responsibility of protecting it from harm. But it was Sheriff James Johnson who was shot and killed by a resident who was anything but a stranger. We take a closer look what happened and how the community is dealing with his sudden loss.

    The KBI continues their investigation into the tragic shooting, including autopsies that were conducted Friday on both 54-year-old Sheriff Johnson and the suspect, 35-year-old Steven Rietcheck.

    A quick survey of Hoxie, Kansas reveals typical small-town America where everyone knows your name and a smile is not uncommon. Yet, in this town, tragedy grips it’s residents.

    "It’s just hard for the whole community to accept it. The sheriff was a hometown boy. He was born and raised here," said Earl Hartzog, resident. "It just don’t happen. It don’t happen."

    But it did happen. Two men are dead -- one of them the sheriff -- gunned down in his own office.

    "Jimmy was just a great man. He did his job and he did his job well," said Lori Horesky, mayor.

    Sheriff James Johnson was doing that job when he was killed. The KBI says the situation started on Wednesday at a cemetery west of Hoxie. That’s where 35-year-old Steven Rietcheck was found digging up his father’s grave. Rietcheck, described as emotionally challenged, was brought into the Sheriff’s Department on Thursday to have a chat with Sheriff Johnson. The two had known each other nearly all their lives. Johnson’s goal was to get Rietcheck to admit himself to a hospital for treatment.

    "He appeared to be cooperative. They asked him about voluntary commitment, he agreed, then suddenly it deteriorated," said Kyle Smith, deputy director, KBI.

    The KBI said it deteriorated to the point where Rietcheck pulled out a handgun and shot Sheriff Johnson. A nearby deputy returned fire, killing Rietcheck.

    "You know, you read them things in the paper and you see it on television but you don’t expect to see it in your own hometown," said Hartzog.

    A town once protected by a popular sheriff and now feeling as if it’s small town innocence has been shattered.

    Flags are now flying at half-staff in Hoxie. The family of suspect, Steven Rietcheck, has expressed their condolences to the Johnson family. The Johnson family themselves are not yet ready to talk.

    SMALL TOWN, BIG RISK

    Sheridan County is small but we learned in the last 24 hours that it didn’t matter, a danger was still lurking. In fact, the last few years have proven that rural Kansas sheriff’s face more danger than we might think. But is part of that because in small towns, our guard is down?

    Hoxie, Kansas has a population of 1,250. Sheridan County has only 2,800 -- small enough to know everyone, including the local sheriff.

    "Sometimes we get a little casual," said Kyle Smith, deputy director, KBI.

    For Sheriff James Johnson, casual meant no bullet proof vest. But then again, he knew his shooter. For years, Steven Rietcheck’s problems, and his meeting with the sheriff Thursday, were nothing new.

    "If you’re in Hoxie, Kansas, where everybody knows everybody, and I don’t know how much crime you have here but you probably didn’t file 20 cases last year, it’s not a situation where you’re expecting something like this to happen," said Smith.

    In Sheridan County, Sheriff Johnson was law enforcement. Only three deputies backed him up. In Kansas, small forces are routine. In fact, 48% of law enforcement agencies have five or fewer members.

    "Sometimes he didn’t wear a gun belt. He always had it with him or it was in the car, but he didn’t always wear his gun belt," said Trooper John Lehnerr.

    Trooper Lehnerr is talking about fallen Greenwood County Sheriff Matt Samuels. Early in his career, he was known as a county steward, never keen on showing his gun until a traffic stop nearly got him killed.

    "I told him, don’t ever do that again, no matter how big a hurry you get in. And he knew that. He was just sick that he did forget it," said Tammy Samuels

    It’s that kind of complacency that can seep into a county where crime is rare. Make no mistake though, law enforcement officials know that there are dangers anywhere and a small town doesn’t mean lazy police work.

    "You can have non-professional conduct in really large departments, you have really outstanding cops in small departments," said Smith.

    In Sheridan county today, they say goodbye to one of those outstanding cops.
     

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