A&P Pointers for shooting indoor portraits?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Curren$y, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. Curren$y

    Curren$y New Member

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    So i got my d50 about 2-3 weeks ago and its my first DSLR. I take it everywhere i go and am slowly learning how to use this thing. My mom wants me to take some pictures of me, her, and my brother. I was wondering if anyone in here could give me some pointers on how to shoot it? Shall i use some white sheets as a backdrop with lots of lighting? Will flouresent lamps work for lighting? My only gear is my d50 with 18-55 kit lens and a tripod. I have been experimenting with bouncing the flash using white note cards and stuff liek that and it has helped me. I just want some more info from the wise men. Thanks guys

    :wavey:
     
  2. use bedsheets, and go get those $20 flood lamps from home depot

    That's all I ever use :dunno:

    How do you like your D50? I have is a nikon s5 that I use for my indoor portrait photoshoots. :bigthumb:
     
  3. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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  4. :rofl: you guys are groupie / stalkers

    oh and i have no clue what that thing is, I just found it, I think it's a satellite dish, when I put it next to my TV I get HBO and Skinimax!! :run:
     
  5. 19Godfather86

    19Godfather86 New Member

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    I think you should shoot in natural light if you can. You probably don't have any sort of formal lighting setup and you don't want to use the built in flash. And a sheet as a backdrop sounds kinda ghetto to me. Finding a nice setting within your house or elsewhere might yeild a result that you/your family will like.
     
  6. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    to take this one step farther, find a north facing window and place your subject next to it so thay the light illuminates the side of their face. Place your camera so that it doesn't include the window in the shot. Arrange the background wall so that it isn't cluttered. Shoot with your lens at it's longest telephoto setting or close to it. Bracket your exposures (one f/stop over and one f/stop under exposed-see "photo 101" sticky to learn what an f/stop is ) to insure that you have at least one correct exposure.

    You should be pleased with the results.
     
  7. Tedrzz

    Tedrzz New Member

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    this is exactly what i was going to say

    here are the results:

    [​IMG]

    only thing i did differently was use my 50mm @ f/2
     
  8. ( * )( * )

    ( * )( * ) OT Supporter

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    Cute kid.
     

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