People with IT careers.

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by JoeMayo, Feb 19, 2008.

  1. JoeMayo

    JoeMayo New Member

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    Selling my 2003 Cobra to buy cheap car and attend college in August.Looking to get into the IT field. I have 3-4 close friends that are in in the IT/programming fields and are willing to help/tutor me. Would you suggest a junior college or go to a 4 year university. I'm not looking to make big bucks. Honestly I'd be happy with 55k. Just need to know what fields that would be hot to go into right now. I live on the Coast of MS where casinos are popping up and business are also. Hospitals,local AFB,Casinos,Stennis Space Center,Northrup Grumman Ship Systems are some of the bigger businesses around here.
     
  2. retorq

    retorq What up bitch??

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    55K isn't big bucks in IT ...
     
  3. JoeMayo

    JoeMayo New Member

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    I heard 55k is big bucks in the "IT" field.. Now programming I hear you can make alot more.
     
  4. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

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    a college education is certainly good to have and computer science is useful for a programmer. other support type stuff doesn't require a degree as much, but college is always good.
     
  5. pyehac

    pyehac if she's old enough to cross the street, she's old

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    You just need the experience.
     
  6. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    I grew up in Biloxi...well technically between Gulfport and Biloxi.
     
  7. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    But to answer your question, you will most certainly not jump into a really great job right outside of college...but don't fret. Your best bet after graduation (and preferably beforehand--internships ftw) is to get in on the ground level in IT for a company and work your way up.
     
  8. RiSk

    RiSk New Member

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    55k aint much, thats like entry level at a decent gig. (Not Helpdesk)
     
  9. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    Not true. Salary is solely dependent on where you live and the company you work for. 55k in SC (I am currently at 55k) is upper middle class...and is a nice paycheck for the IT industry.
     
  10. RiSk

    RiSk New Member

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    55k is not bad for sure, but there is much greener fields out there for sure.

    55k is pretty entry level for most REAL IT jobs no helpdesk or networking flunky
     
  11. Frequency

    Frequency New Member

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    Let me slow it down for you

    It... Depends... On... Where... You... Live...

    I'm currently at 60/yr in bumblefuck PA and its a comfortable living. Now if i were to move to parts of NJ or NY I'd be a poor mother fucker @ 60/yr
     
  12. m0nk3y

    m0nk3y Not now, chief.

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    Out of curiosity, what do ya'll define as a "real" IT job?
     
  13. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    Depends on what your expectations are. Desktop support/helpdesk are technically "IT," but they are generally looked down upon as career choices (starting off as helpdesk and advancing doesn't count).
     
  14. LongDongWong

    LongDongWong U can call me Mr.Wong

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    pardon my ignorance, but why are there so many math courses required for a Computer Science Degree?
     
  15. critter783

    critter783 OT Supporter

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    Because you can't have a true academic understanding of computer science without an understanding of the underlying mathematics.
     
  16. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    What do you like to do? I would suggest you do NOT rely on your friends. Figure shit out yourself no matter how difficult. Yes there will be times when you need help but you should save these for when you're really stuck.

    Why? Because when you get a job, they will expect YOU to be able to think on your feet, to solve problems without constant supervision, to contribute to the team not take away because you're so dependent on others. That's a sure fire recipe for failure.

    OH and college/Uni > community college but it's harder.

    Having said all that, programming can be very boring if you're not into it. Perhaps an MIS degree would be more appealing.
     
  17. Mike99TA

    Mike99TA I don't have anything clever to put here right now

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    I'd just like to chime in with a personal experience.

    I have no college degree, I've been working in IT professionally since ~1997, and I make "big bucks" for the area I live (Greenville SC which has a low cost of living and I'm just barely grazing $100k/yr).

    I'm a system admin (Well, Sr. Unix System admin) so yes, if you know your stuff, decent money is very possible without a college education (which hasn't really seemed to affect my career at all yet - I'm sure if I wanted to get into management, which I don't, it would affect me).
     
  18. Dnepr

    Dnepr Guest

    4 year BS and 2 year MS degree's in Computer Engineering and you can expect 60k+ out of college with some inschool work and research experience.

    45k+ without any experience.
     
  19. Mike99TA

    Mike99TA I don't have anything clever to put here right now

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    Of course depending on where you live - thats a huge factor, especially in the IT world. 45k in NY city is not equal to 45k in piedmont north dakota.

    Unfortunately I know quite a few people that have the bachelor degrees and still only made 35k coming out of college with no experience... as admins of course, if you start out doing programming you may be able to get a little bit more but its not guaranteed - experience is really what gets you a higher IT related salary. The degree is what removes the ceiling.
     
  20. Mike99TA

    Mike99TA I don't have anything clever to put here right now

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    Oh and one piece of advice I like to spread around that I got from someone just like me that was about 5 years ahead of me in their career a long time ago...

    When you start out in IT, especially the helpdesk/system admin world - more than likely you will need to find a new job every 1 1/2 - 2 years. Thats where the reward/time starts going downhill. The first year you'll learn a lot of new things at a job that will help your career, the second year one or two things will happen.

    1) Your learning curve will flatten out quite a bit

    2) You will not get a very big raise but will be given alot more responsibility

    Both of these are very bad in the IT world.

    Sometimes neither will happen after 1 - 2 years, if you're lucky. Generally they both happen at lower job levels (helpdesk, jr system admin, etc) but will tend to not happen as much when you're higher level (regular system admin, sr system admin, etc) as they want to retain people that know the environment, not have a high turnover, and they'll give you more control over technology direction the company is taking - keeping you sharp and keeping your learning curve...curved.

    After doing this for 11 years, the first 6 years I changed jobs every 1 1/2 years - it was the only way I could get a raise > 5%. My last job I actually got 5 raises in 4 years (4 of the raises were > 10%) which is why I stayed there for so long. Now I'm sort of at a point in my career where stability and longevity are important as my learning curve is fairly flat even when first starting anyway, and I'm in an important enough position that we get really good raises and bonuses.

    Just wanted to toss that advice out there, more for people already in the field in their first few years than anything else - it served me quite well as you can see with my job/salary history. Starting salary in IT as tech support while still in High School/just after graduating - $19/yr full time, whereas my current salary ~$100k/yr, no college degree. History of job pay - 19k 1 1/2 years, 34k 1 1/2 years, 45k, 1 1/2 years, 48k-75k (one job multiple raises) 4 years, 85k-98k (current job, just over a year here so far).

    Of course at each of the jobs I still got 3% cost of living raises most of the time at the very least - this is pretty standard and if you don't even get this then its definitely time to move on.

    Oh and last but not least, if you don't love what you do in the IT field theres a really good chance you'll never make decent money without resorting to management. I know tons of system admins and programmers that really just don't enjoy it and they always get stuck in lower end roles because its obvious to management that they're not really "into". You have to be excited about being woken up at 3am to replace a failed hard drive and stuff like that or people either won't hire you at all, or will never give you additional pay/responsibility.
     
  21. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    It's good to start with. Shit, the median household income in the USA is $40k. He'd be making almost 50% more out-of-the-box if he gets $55k for his first job.

    EDIT: And what Mike99TA said about liking your job -- that's a definite must. It really helps if you gain satisfaction from doing something useful, whatever that might be. For my part, I got sick of the IT shit after about 2 years, but because I'm not really an "IT guy" and I just do that stuff because nobody else in the office knows how, the IT work gets mixed in with the other stuff I do. Variety is also a big plus.
     
  22. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

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    i wholeheartedly agree with Mike99TA. early in your career, job hopping is big. and i'd like to add some other things. there are a few people i've worked with over the years who got into one company and worked there for many years and i generally found that they were nowhere near as well rounded as someone who moved around a bit. there was a whole department at my last job working at corporate headquarters who i believe built their entire IT career at that one company. they were so sheltered and had no idea how things worked at different companies, so they were so limited in the solutions they could come up with. but, then on the flip side, i was a hiring manager at my last job and would not hire a senior person who was a job hopper. at the junior level i expect a high rate of turnover, but when i'm investing in a high end person i don't want another pair of hands for a few months to a year. i want someone who is going to stick around and help shape the environment going forward.
     
  23. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    It certainly seems like a double standard here....but I understand why you would think this way. I would suggest it's possible that someone that's moved around a lot, even for a senior position, has been looking for the right company to settle down.

    For me, it would depend more on the person's accomplishments, whether or not I know anything about their prior companies, and what they are looking for. It's possible to expect a mover to jump again in 2 years or less and use that to your advantage.
     
  24. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

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    it isn't really a double standard. there are 2 major issues with junior positions. first, you generally start off with a low salary and most major corporations have a limit to have fast they can promote you or provide you raises. so, early in your career you will find it much easier to get more money by changing jobs. you know, 1st job you generally know next to nothing so you start out doing the most menial tasks. after a very short time you've gotten all that you will get out of that job, yet most likely that company still wants to keep someone at that level doing the low end stuff so they aren't going to move you up right away. so, you need to move. now you have some experience on your resume, though you are still very green. this is the resume building part of your career.

    the 2nd part is that this is the good time in your career to build up the breadth of your knowledge to really see where you want to move towards as you go forward. i started in helpdesk and then moved to desktop support. at that company i got my hands on UNIX and never looked back.


    once you start hitting senior level though, you should have a much better idea of what you are looking for both in terms of your career as well as the company you want to work for. if you haven't kept a recent job for > 1 year, then how am i to feel confident that you'll want to stay at my company? just so you know though, to me senior level is exactly that. i work in the northern NJ or NY area and found that 99% of the people i interviewed for a senior level position paying around $100k were nowhere near what they considered themselves to be.

    by the way, i'm thinking 6months to a year. i wouldn't stay at any job early in an IT career more than a year unless it is a rare company that really gets you involved in a lot of different stuff, provides a lot of training and a lot of growth.
     
  25. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    I understand all that...that's not even addressing the double standard.

    The double standard is that while you advocate people switching jobs you say, "...I was a hiring manager at my last job and would not hire a senior person who was a job hopper. at the junior level...". This seems to be an obvious double standard to me.
     

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