PC problem

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by New Character, Jul 22, 2007.

  1. New Character

    New Character Active Member

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    Story: Ages ago I bought an external hdd, recently it stopped working so i had the bright idea of taking it apart from the case and trying to put it inside my computer. So I hastily unopen my computer and peak inside. Oh look, theres a wire that conveniently fits into one of the connectors! How cool!. So I plug it in and turn on my computer with 2 hdd's inside. I hear a bang then see a spark so decide to turn the computer off. I take away the hdd and turn the pc back on. Everything seems to be fine apart from the fact that it will only run in safe mode, otherwise the monitor just says Mode not supported, even though I can hear the vista sounds loading in the background.

    Any suggestions on how I can run my pwned computer not in safe mode?
     
  2. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    There's so many things that could have fried, there's just no way of telling without troubleshooting it.

    The first thing I would do is unplug every component from the motherboard except the cpu. (not the front panel connectors or the power supply)

    Then turn it on and see if you get beep codes.

    If it doesn't beep you may have fried something on the motherboard.

    If it does beep, plug the hard drive back in and one stick of ram if you have two. If you only have one, put it back in a different slot.


    Now for my guess...
    If you plugged the extra plug in upside down into the hard drive, you may have damaged the power supply as well as the hard drive.
    And that could make it to where you can only get to safe mode.
     
  3. Stilgar1973

    Stilgar1973 New Member

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    The good news is that the hard drive that is inside an 'external' hard drive enclosure is EXACTLY the same drive that is inside of your computer.
    Better news is that when you opened your PC up and saw that wire that looked like it would fit in the end of the hard drive you yanked out of the enclosure - you were on the right track.

    Don't beat yourself up too badly.

    The bad news, you really didn't provide enough information that anyone is going to be able to say, 'Oh this is the problem!'. At least not yet.

    Anything could have happened, anything at all.
    As an example, lets say you dropped a screw and the screw got behind the motherboard. It is possible that the screw shorted out some connections on the motherboard, that would create the sort of spark you mentioned.

    Here is what you are going to do.

    Open the computer back up. Don't touch anything. Take your time and carefully look inside the PC. Look for black marks on any of the PCB's inside the computer. Specifically examine the video card and the motherboard as carefully as you can.

    If you find such a mark then you might have found the culprit.

    Now I am going to give you some really bad news. It is possible for a short like that to take out SEVERAL components.

    So, for the moment there you go.

    If you do decide to remove some things inside the computer you might want to sketch out on a piece of paper how the thing fit in there in the first place.
    If you remove a sound card from a PCI slot it is best to put it back in the same PCI slot.

    Plus if you take notes about how you took something out and how it was in there in the first place there is a less of a chance of getting it wrong when you put it back in.

    And once again, don't blame yourself. This shit just happens.

    Something else that MAY have bitten you.
    Electrostatic discharge.
    When you walk across the carpet in your socks and touch the doorknob - that is an electrostatic discharge.

    This is very, very, very bad for computers and electronics. It is perfectly harmless to you and me but for the insides of the PC it is evil.

    One of the functions of the computer case is to route the ESD around the delicate internals and ground it through the plug into the wall.
    And you thought the case was just decorative!

    The thing is, when you open up the case to do work inside of it you are bypassing this. When you are working inside the PC it is up to you to ensure that no sort of ESD takes out the components.

    I did a quick Google, this page: http://www.pccomputernotes.com/esd/esd.htm
    talks a bit about this subject.
     
  4. Stilgar1973

    Stilgar1973 New Member

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    Most IDE cables are keyed so they cannot be plugged in backwards. Notice I said 'most'. Not all. I can't imagine an IDE cable in backwards causing the problem he is describing. I suppose that *anything* is possible though.

    Also, the power plug on a *hard drive is set up so that it CANNOT be plugged in backwards. Someone would have to exert a considerable amount of force on the plug (and maybe a pair of plyers) to overcome this.
    Not to mention that if one flips the plug over so it is the correct way it goes on easily.

    *Molex plug - I couldn't remember the proper name when I originally wrote this post.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2007
  5. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    I meant the power cable.

    I don't think you would get sparks from the ide cable being in upside down.
     
  6. Stilgar1973

    Stilgar1973 New Member

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    The Molex plug of the hard drive is almost impossible to put in upside down.
     

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