P4 2.6 or 3.0? and raid 0 or not?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Achance007, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. Achance007

    Achance007 Active Member

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    Is it worth the extra $123 to get a 3.0 instead of the 2.6.
    And the computer I'm looking at comes with 2 maxtor 60 gig hd set up in raid 0. Now I know that is supposed to be faster, but I've heard that my chances of loosing all my data is increased. So is it better just to have get the two drives and tell them not to set up the raid 0?
    The system is going to be mainly used for gaming, internet, and occasionaly a photochop.
     
  2. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    With a RAID 0 setup your chance of a HD failing and loosing all your data is doubled. For what you are doing I would just use them as 2 seperate drives. Or if you are good about backups and want the extra speed gor for the RAID 0
     
  3. Achance007

    Achance007 Active Member

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    I guess I better get them as two seperate drives then because I rarely back up. How much of a speed boost is it? if its less than 5% or something then i don't think it would be worth it.

    Any thoughts about my p4 2.6 or 3.0 decision?
     
  4. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    2.4

    Buy the slowest of the new generation chips all the time. There's not a huge jump from our PIII 733 to my current 2.4 Hyperthreading machine :hs:
     
  5. TenzoR

    TenzoR She is hot hot hot

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    2.4 and OC that sucker, but if you are not plannig to OC or upgrade in the future by all means by the best processor you can afford.

    As for HD, I personal dislike Maxtor and prefer WD and Seagate myself. If date integrity is important to you, then you can set your RAID to raid 1. That will mirror image your drives so you have a total of 60GB. Basically when ever something is created on one drive, the other drive will have an image.
     
  6. Achance007

    Achance007 Active Member

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    not really sure how to overclock, is there alot invovled?
     
  7. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    No - but you could void your warranty by doing so. There's going to be benchmark whores telling you to overclock, but I guarantee you won't see any realworld difference between a 2.4 and 3.0
     
  8. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    I'd stay away from RAID 0 unless you know what you're doing. And from reading the posts, you're not quite ready yet. Later on, you can always reconfigure it (although you will probably lose all your data, so plan ahead).

    I haven't figured out the overclocking thing. I haven't been reading the gaming magazines so I'm up to speed on the OC numbers, but at this day and age, are the OC numbers there to justify the overclocking? Are you really getting that much more gain to make it worth the tweaking and risks?

    Or is this a retro thing? Where it was cool to do OC 386s and 486s so we shall continue doing it today? Back in the day, overclocking a 386DX 40Mhz machine yielded 80Mhz which was a HUGE difference in performance and price. I dunno... Call me old school.
     
  9. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Na, you're just old.

    :fawk:

    But as you can tell - I totally agree. As I said before - my 733 is not much slower than my 2.4 - and that can be attributed to the 768 MB of RAM difference :rofl:
     
  10. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    With this, that means that there isn't anything critical on this machine, correct? Then I'd say do it. The performance increase will be worth it if you don't care to loose anything. Just make sure you backup your photoshop projects remotely and/or on a regular basis.

    I personally have a box like this, a raid 0 box for games, movies, mp3's, and crap. Nothing I care about. Well a box that I don't care about so much, that I forgot the password. =/ Anyways...

    I've asked this before and I'll ask it again. People who are claiming "double" the risk of disk failure, of course that's true, but what are your experiences? Do you have any or is this just from reading this online?

    I've been using raid sets long long before the were introduced to home usage, software and hardware and seen what can be recovered and what can't be recovered.

    Now, lets look at an example hardware errors for a single disk. A disk starts clunking, head crashing, platter jams. Hopefully initial signs are bad block on the disk that can't be read or written to. Hopefully a scan disk can mark it unusable. But that's a sign to back up what you need and get rid of it. What do you think this will look like if it was a stripe set? Same exact thing. The raid set will still be alive until you access that block.

    Software error or controller errors. Let say your pci controller dies or you update your raid software it screws everything up. It doesn't see your boot device or the stripe set or even mirror sets. What do you do? There are quite a few utilites to recover from raid sets, even stripe sets. Why? Because of the metadata that is written in each partition across the platter. With this metadata, you can rebuild what once was there after you fix the controller issue. I've experienced this a few times and the utility I used is the same one that fixes crashes from the old chernobyl virus. I don't remember what it's called.

    That was a lot of babbling. But essentially, if you don't care about the data on this box, go raid. Have fun.

    -crontab -l
     

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