A&P OT I need some photo taking help.

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by momoarrowz, May 20, 2003.

  1. momoarrowz

    momoarrowz New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2002
    Messages:
    10,467
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    LI, New York
    My camera is an Olympus d-370 1.3 MP.

    I wanted to take some cool pics of my car with just the overhead lamps lighting it up, you know a pic like this:
    [​IMG]

    With Flash
    [​IMG]
    Without
    [​IMG]
    Without
    [​IMG]



    What am i doing wrong? I click the icon that has the lightning with a circle in it to turn off the flash.
     
  2. Dan3S

    Dan3S New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2001
    Messages:
    14,384
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MA
    You need a tripod. At night with lights like that requires longer exposure times, and you cannot do those by hand, because the camera moves in your hands, thats why its all blury. You also need to set your white balance somehow or something,thats why the pictures are so red. But first, get a tripod.
     
  3. momoarrowz

    momoarrowz New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2002
    Messages:
    10,467
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    LI, New York
    woot thanks :bigthumb:
     
  4. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    If you really want to shoot some cool night shots, go buy yourself a cheap flash unit. Set your camera on a tripod and set your lens to F/8. Open the shutter to "bulb" or a time exposure of 30 seconds. Quickly walk around the car with the flash unit in your hand and "flash" the car from several different angles while your cameras shutter is open.
    Don't point the flash towards the camera. Do this several times, at different apeture settings. As long as you are moving and don't stand still, your body will not registar on the photo however the light will.

    This techinque is called "painting with light".

    You can buy a small strobe for under $50 at most photo supply stores.

    cheers
    J.
     
  5. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2002
    Messages:
    116,620
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    nocal
    tripod, tungsten setting for white balance, meter on something dark (you can put your hand infront of the lens right before you take the picture)

    in your example, it's probably a safe guess that it was exposed for a long time, just because the night sky is tinted green, meaning that it was open for a long time and the city lights were able to reflect off the sky enough. in yours, the sky is so dark that it means your shutter wasn't open for nearly long enough. I've done 10 min exposures (but they were at f22) that didn't have that much light pollution

    watch out though, because it looks like in yoru second picture, there are street lights behind you and they're reflecting off your car... if you expose it for too long with a tripod, those spots are going to become really really white and washed out
     

Share This Page