Ooh...tough choices.

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by deusexaethera, Aug 12, 2009.

  1. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    First off, the new internal wireless card showed up for my VAIO yesterday, and that went in nice and easy. Funny how reassembly is always about 10x easier than disassembly.

    Supposedly this machine can only handle 1GB of RAM, but I swiped 2GB from work (that I bought and never expensed) out of a machine I've been testing Vista on, and what do you know, the 2GB works fine in the VAIO. But Vista needs lots of RAM. Should I keep the 2GB in my VAIO and put the 1GB into the work machine, or should I put the 2GB back in the machine that needs it more?

    Also, when XP first came out there was a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth about the Prefetch function, and apparently lots of people disabled it before they realized it really is useful after all. But, my VAIO has an SSD in it, and disabling the Prefetch continues to be recommended for SSDs. Anybody know if there really is a good reason to disable the Prefetch on an SSD? Is it designed to make up for a deficiency in rotating disks, or would it be useful when every bit of data is equally accessible at all times?
     
  2. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Weren't you one of those people?
     
  3. SeeVinceRun

    SeeVinceRun Currently In Prison OT Supporter

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    On older SSDs people disabled prefetch to take a load off the JMICRON chips that stuttered or something.

    There was also the idea that prefetch lowered the life expectancy of SSDs, but that was just a unfounded fear.
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    So basically it's useless to disable it. Okay, that's pretty much what I suspected.

    Now, disabling write-caching does make a difference, since SSDs don't have any latency to speak of, there's no reason to wait until nothing is reading data before trying to write data.
     
  5. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    My SSD Macbook Pro is not much faster than the HD one was, now that its got some data in it. An incremental, not revolutionary improvement. Worth the 5 Grand? Not yet, thats for sure. Over the next year? Probably.

    My workflow is... Postgres, lots of copies, lots of finds/ack/greps, Apache Pig iterating on data, etc.

    I'll probably replace it with something faster in the next year or so.

    Dunno if thats helpful or not. I need 8GB of RAM, not 4. And I need an SSD 4-8 times this fast. Then I'll be happy.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Peyomp, what you need is a database server that fits in a purse. Why are you running SQL on a laptop?

    Does Mac OS support the SSD TRIM command yet?
     
  7. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Dunno what that is, but I agree with you. Problem is I'm mobile. Sometimes I bother to boot EC2, sometimes i don't.
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    If you're actually considering spending more money on a better laptop, buy an IPSEC VPN router and spare econobox for your house instead and set up a SQL server back home. You can hit it from wherever you are as long as you have an internet connection.

    SSD TRIM is a command supported by some higher-end SSDs (the ones in Macbooks included, I'm pretty sure) that uses idle time to clear the contents of unused memory pages, because what slows down SSDs is when a non-empty page needs to get overwritten, the entire block of pages has to get read, modified in RAM, erased from the SSD, and rewritten.
     
  9. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Other than a notebook, I never, ever buy hardware. I'd just use EC2 :)
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Dunno what that is, but if it involves the SQL server running somewhere other than your laptop, do it.

    Or else buy a quad-core and a second hard drive.
     

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