LGBT On Politics...

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by CoCo, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    not really queer, but an interesting string of articles...
    (and in all honesty, when I read the title to the first article, I just knew it was going to be queer :o )

    Celebrity Donors Come Out in Force for Kerry:
    Can they turn his tide?

    GEORGE Bush might have the upper hand over Senator John Kerry in the fundraising race that is fuelling their bids for the White House in November, but Mr Kerry’s Hollywood supporters are doing their utmost to eliminate the president’s financial advantage.

    This week the rock star Jon Bon Jovi hosted a fundraiser for Mr Kerry at his New Jersey home at which 300 guests raised more than $1 million (£540,000) for the Kerry campaign. Mr Kerry, underlining the importance and financial muscle of the celebrity endorsement, flew in by helicopter for the event.

    Speaking at the fundraiser, the singer acknowledged the drawbacks of dabbling in politics but pledged to continue to back Mr Kerry’s campaign.

    "I’ve received hate-mail at my house. I’ve had people drive by my home and shout things out," he said. "And I think that they question my patriotism because I decided to stand up and have a voice. And I stood up to have a voice because I think that’s the most American thing that you can do."

    Bon Jovi is not the only celebrity to have pledged support for Mr Kerry. Joining him at the fundraiser were the actors Meg Ryan, James Gandolfini and Steve Buscemi.

    The pop musician Moby has joined forces with the liberal pressure group moveon.org and has urged liberals to make their own anti-Bush adverts that can be spread via the internet.

    Madonna, who initially endorsed General Wesley Clarke during the Democratic primary campaign, has said of Mr Bush: "Our greatest risk is not terrorism, and it’s not Iraq or the Axis of Evil. Our greatest risk is a lack of leadership, a lack of honesty and a complete lack of consciousness."

    Among the fiercer critics of the president is the actor Alec Baldwin, like Barbra Streisand and Martin Sheen a long-standing liberal activist, who has argued: "Everything that Bush touches turns to manure in public policy."

    Gwyneth Paltrow recently joined the growing number of A-list stars to criticise the president when she said: "I think George Bush is such an embarrassment to America in the way that he doesn’t take the rest of the world into consideration."

    Mr Bush’s campaign is notably less star studded than his rival’s. Although Arnold Schwarzenegger will campaign for Mr Bush in California, his duties as its governor mean he is unlikely to spend much time on the national campaign trail.

    Kelsey Grammer, whose hit sitcom Frasier has just concluded its final season, is one of the few stars supporting the president’s campaign for re-election. He acted as master of ceremonies at a Bush fundraiser in March.

    Last year Bruce Willis told the president he was willing to volunteer for military service if necessary, only to be told he was too old for active duty.

    Four years ago the actors Bo Derek and Chuck Norris were among the few Hollywood celebrities to campaign openly for Mr Bush, although neither has so far appeared in the president’s 2004 campaign.

    This Bush campaign season has been almost equally star-free, although the pop singer Jessica Simpson has sung at Republican fundraisers. Former Beverly Hill 90210 star Shannen Doherty also calls herself "a big fan of President Bush".

    While the Clinton years saw a procession of celebrities staying overnight at the White House, Mr Bush’s residency has been largely celebrity-free. White House records show that the golfer Ben Crenshaw is one of the few celebrities who have been invited to stay the night.

    Although celebrity supporters can raise a candidate’s profile, their chief use is to attract more voters and sell tickets to fundraising events, argues Alan Schroeder, professor of journalism at Northeastern university in Boston and author of Celebrity-in-Chief: How Show Business Took Over the White House.

    "An upside to celebrity endorsement of a candidate is that a star can glamorise a campaign. Someone like John Kerry, who’s not the most charismatic politician, can, by associating with a celebrity, make himself look like a celebrity," he said.

    Such endorsements can also pose a danger, as Gen Clarke discovered this year when the campaign was forced on to the back foot following comments from the film-maker Michael Moore, who supported Ralph Nader in the 2000 elections.

    After backing the former NATO commander, Mr Moore accused Mr Bush of being a deserter. Gen Clarke was asked if he associated himself with the allegation, a story that ate up valuable airtime and newsprint, preventing his campaign from communicating a more positive message.

    Although celebrity support can win a candidate free extra media coverage, it is not likely to be a factor when voters decide who to vote for.

    According to Larry Sabato, director of the Centre for Politics at the University of Virginia: "My take on celebrity endorsements is that the only weak minds they can sway are fortunately not registered voters, or they don’t show up at the polls."
     
  2. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    this was just enlightening...

    The Inner W.
    Three new psychological portraits of George W. Bush paint him as a control freak driven by rage, fear and an almost murderous Oedipal competition with his father. And that's before we get to Mom.

    [​IMG]

    By Laura Miller

    June 16, 2004 | Through a glass, darkly. That's how most Americans see the character and personality of George W. Bush. The only difference is the tint: Bush's supporters look at him through a rosy filter that makes him look like a man of moral fiber and resolve, unpretentious and commonsensical. His detractors see everything he does with a sallow brown tinge, tainted by greed, dishonesty, bellicosity, self-righteousness and ignorance. But even the most alarmist descriptions of him clash: The Bush-bashers' Bush is either a scheming, shameless champion of the rich and powerful or their empty-headed puppet, a soulless tool of corporate power or a religious fanatic convinced he's preparing the nation for the Second Coming. None of these versions jibes very well with the accounts of people who actually know him, and so -- once you step outside the cartoon universe of pure polemics -- Bush himself has never quite come into focus.

    "Bush on the Couch: Inside the Mind of the President," by Justin Frank, a clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at George Washington University Medical Center, is supposed to offer a more in-depth portrait. To say that it succeeds would be to give Frank and his publisher too much credit. This is a sloppily written and edited book, padded with repetitions and laced with dubious psychological theories. It is also -- despite Frank's avowed intention to "preserve a distinction between my personal questions about President Bush's politics and my psychoanalytic evaluation of his character," far too partisan a work to make any claim to being a judicious examination of Bush the man.
    Nevertheless, if you can hack your way through the underbrush, "Bush on the Couch" brings together a lot of provocative information, and some genuinely enlightening hypotheses, from which the resourceful reader can assemble a portrait of Bush that accounts for his seeming contradictions. Combine it with Peter Singer's "The President of Good and Evil: The Ethics of George W. Bush," a clear-headed and superbly reasoned dissection of Bush's much-touted morality, and the forthcoming "Personality, Character and Leadership in the White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents," a comparative evaluation of Bush and his predecessors in the office, by Steven J. Rebenzer and Thomas R. Faschingbauer, and the portrait gains more heft.


    What emerges is the image of a man shaped by rage and fear. Frank, who subscribes to the variant of psychoanalysis formulated by Melanie Klein, has his own ideas about where Bush's anger and anxiety come from. Some of those ideas are silly and difficult to support, like the belief that newborn infants blame themselves for their expulsion from the paradise of the womb, and feel both guilt about and fear of their own destructive capabilities. Others make sense, like the probability that Bush, who surely experienced the usual sibling rivalry, felt some unconscious guilt over the death of his younger sister Robin, from leukemia, when he was 7 and she was 3.

    Bush's parents dealt with Robin's death by squelching any expression of grief; there was no funeral and they played golf the day after she died. This, according to Frank, is a key example of the family's approach to all such painful emotions, and the result was to distort and cripple the psyche of their firstborn son. Frank provides an elaborate description of how the healthy process of psychological "integration" is supposed to work, some of which is based on such unconvincing Kleinian theories as the "good mother" and the "bad mother." But in general, his thesis is credible: If a child's parents teach him that his feelings of suffering, fear, weakness and rage are so unacceptable that they can't even be acknowledged, he is likely to spend his life projecting those feelings onto other people and punishing them for it. It's one of the ways bullies are minted.

    George W. would find plenty of opportunities to practice the art of projection as he grew up. Frank, who is always on firmest footing when he's working from concrete biographical material, points out that from an early age, George W. Bush consistently failed in everything at which his father excelled. He got poor grades at the same schools where his father did well, and was a disaster in the same industry (oil) where his father made his fortune. His father was a varsity athlete; George W. had to settle for the cheerleading squad. His father was a fighter pilot in World War II; George W. was a desultory member of the Texas Air National Guard.

    Frank's psychoanalytic training pays off in one aspect by giving him an eye for the eloquent detail. There's George W.'s first, abortive engagement at 20, the same age at which his father married. And then there's George W. celebrating his role in the purchasing of the Texas Rangers by printing up baseball cards with his picture on them, a pathetically transparent effort to erase the fact that "he could never be the baseball star his father was." Even the exhaustively analyzed "Mission Accomplished" charade on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln in May 2003 takes on new meaning when you interpret it as a "pantomime of [George W.'s] father's war heroism."

    Some observers have read George W.'s obsession with ousting Saddam Hussein as motivated by revenge for Saddam's attempted assassination of his father. It could also be seen as the determination to pull off something that his father failed to achieve. But dig a little deeper and it also looks like an attempt to exorcise what must be one nasty case of Oedipal resentment. By Frank's formula, families like the Bushes, where difficult emotions are banished, produce children who cast other people as the symbols of their own unintegrated negative urges and feelings: "I don't want to kill my father, he does, and to prove that I'm devoid of such bad impulses, I'll take him out."

    Of course, not everyone faced with such a nightmarish Oedipal setup as George W. Bush's deals with it by simply playing through. Most, in fact, probably do something like what George W. himself did in his youth: act out, get in trouble and stifle the internal conflicts with booze. Bizarrely, seen in context, George W.'s drinking actually starts to look like a relatively straightforward way to confront a miserable situation, as in the notorious 1973 incident in which the 26-year-old George W., called on the carpet for driving drunk with his teenage brother, crashed through some garbage cans and called out his father to "go mano a mano right here!" Sure, it's a messed-up way of venting, but it's better than starting a war.

    Now (ostensibly) sober, George W. toes the family line, and when he's not letting off steam geopolitically, he uses the outlets favored by his mother, a less-discussed but probably more significant influence on his character. By most reliable accounts a truly scary piece of work, Barbara Bush is known around the Bush home by the nickname "the Enforcer." (A family friend described her to George W. biographer Bill Minutaglio as "the one who instills fear.") Barbara seems to be the source of George W.'s penchant for teasing, that overtly chummy but covertly hostile technique he especially likes to use on the press, who alarm and intimidate him. The animosity swirling beneath the placid surface of the Bush family keeps leaking out in little puffs of chilly spite disguised as jokes, whether it's George W.'s cracking wise about his mother's cooking, referring to his wife as "the lump in the bed next to me," or telling the press that a daughter recently hospitalized for an emergency appendectomy might join the family for a Florida vacation, but "if not, she can clean her room."

    How much do these personality traits affect Bush's performance as
    president? As unsavory as they are, they aren't necessarily guarantors of a disastrous presidency. As Rebenzer and aschingbauer point out in "Personality, Character and Leadership in the White House," several presidents rated by biographers and historians as vindictive and domineering are also considered effective leaders, Lyndon B. Johnson being one prime example. The president whose personality assessment most closely matches George W. Bush's is Andrew Jackson, a controversial but undeniably accomplished man, rated as "near-great" by most of the historians polled. (Native Americans, of course, would strenuously disagree.)

    Jackson, however, was also rated as a particularly creative leader by the same respondents, and creativity is not a quality anyone, not even his supporters, would attribute to Bush. He's just not that flexible or adventurous. Frank, who considers Bush to be "an intelligent person whose access to his intelligence [is] hampered by his disabilities" (he suspects attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and dyslexia), comes up with several reasons for this and other behaviors that cause many to dismiss Bush as stupid. Above all, he points to the president's rigidity. In some of the most insightful passages of "Bush on the Couch," he suggests that Bush's semiparalytic manner when speaking publicly, his insistence on rigorously scripting such appearances and the obviously enormous effort he puts into maintaining his focus during official occasions point to a horror of spontaneity, even if it comes in the form of a rudimentary dialogue.

    While the conventional wisdom might suggest that Bush fears being unmasked as a dolt, Frank believes that Bush's rigidity -- also manifest in his ironclad daily routine -- protects him from inadvertently revealing the darker emotions he's never come to terms with. In addition to the fear of not living up to his father's example, there's the anger at being expected to, and the fear of the destructive power of that anger should it ever be unleashed. The primitive moral vision Bush subscribes to -- in which the world is divided into the good, "freedom-loving" people of America and "evildoers" like Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein -- is another inflexible schema that imposes order on the internal chaos that's always threatening to rise up and swamp him. Maintaining such control takes a considerable amount of energy, according to Frank, which may be one reason why Bush needs so much sleep and finds it so hard to concentrate.

    Bush's born-again Christianity, an anomaly in his patrician East Coast clan, serves a similar function. For Bush, faith is less about the joyful worship of God in a community of believers (as Frank points out, he seldom attends church) than it is about forcing a structure on both the world and his own life without the risks inherent in a genuine attempt to understand either one. As Frank shrewdly observes, unlike your garden variety AA member, the born-again Christian need not ever examine his pre-conversion past; it can be partitioned off and dispensed with as irrelevant, which is just what Bush has done. The rowdy George W. who drank too much and, when soused, actually owned up to his wrath at his father and his own lot in life, now no longer exists.

    Unfortunately, not all of Frank's insights are so welcome. If political commentators often resort to overly simplistic notions of character, psychoanalysts tend to overly personalize politics. Frank regards every act of the Bush administration as a direct emanation from the psyche of George W. himself. He seems unaware that a presidency is a collaboration, or that sincerity is not always a viable political option. What can you say about a book that deplores the vindictive dirty tricks the administration uses on its critics yet never once mentions the name of Karl Rove? Likewise, when a politician reneges on a campaign promise to supply funds to one downtrodden constituency or another, the motivation is much more likely to be expedience than a sadistic delight in seeing the needy disappointed. It's unlikely that Bush personally decided to release photographs of the bodies of Saddam Hussein's sons, and in any case, the more plausible motive was the stated one, to forestall Iraqi rumors of a hoax, not to crow over the victory and gross out the world. A lot of what the administration does is driven by simple greed and political calculation, not complicated unconscious desires.

    Psychoanalysts also have an annoying propensity to interpret every behavior that they don't approve of as a manifestation of pathology, teeming with hidden meanings. As a result, Frank, your basic liberal, never honestly engages with the conservative ideology that Bush espouses and all the counterarguments it makes to liberal ideals of good government. The underlying premise of "Bush on the Couch" is that because Bush is a conservative, he must be suffering from "an array of multiple, serious and untreated symptoms." Bush may indeed be gravely troubled emotionally, but that conclusion doesn't automatically follow from his conservatism and it's neither respectful nor adult to act as if it does.

    That's why Peter Singer's "The President of Good and Evil" is a necessary companion to "Bush on the Couch." Singer, a professor of bioethics at Princeton, subjects the various moral and policy pronouncements of the president to rigorous but fair scrutiny, unveiling them as a mass of contradictions and inconsistencies. "The President of Good and Evil" is no semihysterical denunciation, and it's more credible for that. Yet, interestingly enough, this stringently impersonal survey of Bush's ethics conveys a sense of how Bush thinks that jibes well with "Bush on the Couch" in many areas.

    Of course, there's something slightly absurd about applying the reasoning of a philosopher to what's essentially an instinct-based moral code. "I'm not a textbook player," Bush told Bob Woodward, "I'm a gut player." Still, at every point where Bush's stated values come into conflict with his actions or other stated values, a little flash of light goes off, and what's illuminated is a vision of life rooted in fury and terror and a need to dominate the self and others as a way of containing both. Maybe that's one reason why George W. Bush is always talking about freedom. He'd probably like to know what it feels like.
     
  3. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    lolololololololol....Oh Ben...

    Gay Democrats Leave Boston Energized & Hopeful
    [​IMG]


    (Boston, Massachusetts) While many of the 255 GLBT delegates to the Democratic National Convention held here July 26-29 expressed disappointment over presidential candidate John Kerry's opposition to same-sex marriage and his support for amending Massachusetts' constitution to ban it, they were nonetheless united in their conviction that four more years of George W. Bush will be a disaster for GLBT people.
    And they said that Kerry has taken the right position on nearly every other issue of concern to the GLBT community. He supports enactment of same-sex civil-union laws that grant the rights of marriage, and opposes amending the U.S. Constitution to ban same-sex marriage.

    "I want to address these next words directly to President George W. Bush," Kerry said in his nomination acceptance speech. "In the weeks ahead, let's be optimists not just opponents. Let's build unity in the American family not angry division. Let's honor this nation's diversity. Let's respect one another. And let's never misuse for political purposes the most precious document in American history: the Constitution of the United States."

    That reference to the antigay Federal Marriage Amendment elicited the second-loudest outburst of cheering of Kerry's 47-minute speech.

    Outside of the convention hall, GLBT Caucus meetings were addressed by a cavalcade of politicians and celebrities who proclaimed their support for GLBT Americans.

    "The gay and lesbian community is no longer put on the sidelines," said New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson. "You are an essential part of the Democratic Party."

    "There will be a time," said actor-activist Rob Reiner, "and it won't be so long in the distant future, where gays and lesbians will have all the rights that every American has. And we'll look back at this time as being ... what was the issue? What were we even thinking about?"

    Actor Ben Affleck seconded that emotion.

    "I really look forward to looking back on this aspect of our convention [the marriage debate] with some degree of embarrassment for how antiquated it was, where we even have to stand up here and mention that we have some friend who's gay," he said. "Guess what folks? Everybody has a friend, a brother, a family member who's gay. ... You're entitled to every goddamned right that every other American is.

    "If you want to defend marriage," Affleck said, "find somebody and love that person, and care for that person, and be faithful to that person, and commit your life to that person, and don't worry about your neighbor's marriage. ... As somebody who, to be perfectly frank, has enough trouble figuring out who to marry, I don't need the federal or state government telling me who I can marry."

    Greeted with wild applause from GLBT delegates, Affleck said: "A reception like that just makes me want to take my shirt off and dance. ... You know ... my partner and I -- Matt Damon -- have done more for raising the profile and awareness for gay men in this city than anyone in the last 10 years."
     
  4. PSUPef2K

    PSUPef2K #Elite member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2000
    Messages:
    116,260
    Likes Received:
    0
    please see my avatar. :o
     
  5. Notorious R.I.E.

    Notorious R.I.E. Queen Bee

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    807
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Newnan, Ga
    same here even though i don't have an avatar ;)
    I get so tired of seeing political bashing...
    offices used to be about public service, and now it's just about power and prestige....

    I honestly think though that bush really cares about this country and wants to do what is best for it... even though he doesn't agree with gay marriage and as long as he is running the country i know i won't be able to get married. to me he is still the better choice...
     
  6. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    a funny pic...

    :rofl:
    [​IMG]

    The photo, credited to the Yale yearbook (the caption is in the original), appeared in the yesterday's Los Angeles Times, alongside a story on the appeal of "bad boys" in American politics.

    Incidentally, while rugby is a contact sport, every player knows that tackling above the shoulders is a foul. And so is leaving your feet during a tackle. Either of these is serious enough that the other team is immediately awarded a penalty kick, often directly resulting in points for the other team.

    So even without throwing a punch, Bush is already well outside fair play.

    Grasping an opponent by the back of the head and punching him in the face is beyond the pale -- being at St. Mary's with no football, I've watched rugby for years, and I've never seen it during an open-field tackle like this, honest -- and will typically result in a player being immediately sent off.

    So all of that makes this a really funny picture.
     
  7. NOVAJock

    NOVAJock Modded & Underrated

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2002
    Messages:
    15,260
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nowhere in particular
    "Fools"
     
  8. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    WASHINGTON - The House emphatically rejected a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage Thursday, the latest in a string of conservative pet causes advanced by Republican leaders in the run-up to Election Day.

    The vote was 227-186, 49 votes shy of the two-thirds needed for approval of an amendment that President Bush backed but the Senate had previously scuttled.

    "God created Adam and Eve, He didn't create Adam and Steve," said Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., on behalf of a measure that supporters said was designed to protect an institution as old as civilization itself.

    Democrats countered that Republicans were motivated by election-year politics as much as anything, particularly since a Senate vote this year ended any immediate chance the amendment could be sent to the states for ratification.

    Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the Democratic whip, accused GOP leaders of "raw political cynicism" and said they hoped to "create the fodder for a demagogic political ad."

    Bush issued a statement expressing disappointment with the vote's outcome.

    "Because activist judges and local officials in some parts of the country are seeking to redefine marriage for the rest of the country, we must remain vigilant in defending traditional marriage," the president said.

    The measure drew the support of 191 Republicans and 36 Democrats. Voting against it were 158 Democrats, 27 Republicans and one independent.

    The debate on the gay marriage amendment came a day after the House voted 250-171 to overturn a 28-year municipal ban on handgun ownership in the District of Columbia. And last week, Republicans forced a vote on legislation to protect the words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance from court challenge. It passed, 247-173.

    While both of those measures face uncertain prospects in the Senate, they -along with the gay marriage proposal- appeal to voting groups whose support Republicans are counting on in the Nov. 2 elections. Recent surveys in battleground states in the presidential race indicate roughly one-quarter of Bush's supporters say moral or family values are uppermost in their minds.

    The gay marriage amendment said marriage in the United States "shall consist only of a man and a woman." It also would have required that neither the U.S. Constitution nor any state constitution "shall be construed to require that marriage or the legal incidents thereof be conferred upon any union other than the union of a man and a woman."

    Even among majority Republicans, the issue generated dissent.

    Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, was the principal speaker on behalf of the measure, taking a role that is almost always reserved for the chairman of the committee with jurisdiction. In this case, though, the leadership bypassed the Judiciary Committee, and GOP officials said the panel's chairman, Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., made clear he wanted no part of the debate. His spokesman did not immediately return a call for comment.

    DeLay said the need for congressional action was "forced upon us by activist judges trying to legislate from the bench." He noted that under 1996 legislation passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton, marriage is defined as between a man of a woman.

    "One would think this would be the end of the story. But it is not," DeLay said. The law is "under an incessant and coordinated attack in the federal courts," where he said judges feel a greater "responsibility to their own political ideology than the Constitution."

    "The limitations of traditional marriage rest not on an intent to discriminate, but on what is most beneficial for society and children as evidenced by volumes of social science research," added Rep. Marilyn Musgrave, R-Colo.

    "Traditional marriage is worth preserving, because the nuclear family is far and away the best environment in which to raise children. Every child deserves both a father and a mother," said Musgrave, whose persistent advocacy for the measure has gained her national notice unusual for a first-term lawmaker.

    Critics saw it differently.

    "We feel love and we feel it in a way different than you," said Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., who is openly gay. "We feel it with someone of the same sex, male or female, and we look at your institution of marriage and we see the joy it brings. How do we hurt you when we share it?"

    Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass. quoted Vice President Dick Cheney _ who has a gay daughter _ as saying, "The fact of the matter is that we live in a free society and freedom means freedom for everybody."

    Public polls show strong opposition to gay marriage, but opinion is about evenly divided regarding a federal constitutional amendment to ban it.

    At the same time, voters in 11 states will decide the fate of proposed amendments to their state constitutions this fall, and opponents of bans on gay marriage concede they will be difficult to stop.

    The issue has gained prominence this year. Massachusetts residents have had first-in-the-nation rights to same sex marriages since May, the result of a ruling by the state's highest court. A judge in Washington recently struck down that state's ban on same-sex marriage.
     
  9. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    What did everyone think of the debate last night?
     
  10. marxwa99

    marxwa99 Boom Squad

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2001
    Messages:
    4,493
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    B. Lake, WA
    i am still undecided in who i will vote for. I'm letting the debates aid in helpin me make my decision. I looked at the debate from the viewpoint of both a republican backing bush, and a democrat backin kerry. I didn't listen to pre or post debate commentary. Although everyone says now that Kerry 'won" it, I really don't see strong enough evidence to back up that statement. Bush and Kerry performed just as they were expected to and there was no true winner.

    I'm still undecided but look forward to the next two debates to see what happens there.

    As a side story, my friend, Jake, who is a gay republican and has been losing a lot of his friends over the fact that he supports bush had a bit of a run in at the airport. A guy who used to like him and now hates him because he supports bush made a huge scene. Jake and his family were goin in the board room at an airlines to wait for a flight. The guy that used to like him, clinton, works at that board room coincidentally, sees Jake and stops what hes doin and goes and makes a big scene screaming "i cant believe you're voting for bush! you're gonna screw it up for the rest of us!" Then he directs his attention to not only Jake's dad, but also his grandma. From what Jake knows and understands, because of his father's complaint to Clinton's supervisor, Clinton is no longer employed by the airlines company. :owned: serves the jerk right i says :)
     
  11. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    ...that fag was crazy. :eek3:
     
  12. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    Okay, so I found this article a couple days ago, and emailed it to my job so that I could read it at work. It was written by Dave Lindorff, who is the author of "This Can't Be Happening! Resisting the Disintegration of American Democracy".

    Bush's Mystery Bulge in the First Debate
    October 8, 2004​
    By: Dave Lindorff​
    [​IMG]

    Was President Bush literally channeling Karl Rove in his first debate with John Kerry? That's the latest rumour flooding the Internet, unleashed last week in the wake of an image caught by a television camera during the Miami debate. The image shows a large solid object between Bush's shoulder blades as he leans over the lectern and faces moderator Jim Lehrer. The president is not known to wear a back brace, and it's safe to say he wasn't packing. So was the bulge under his well-tailored jacket a hidden receiver, picking up transmissions from someone offstage feeding the president answers through a hidden earpiece? Did the device explain why the normally ramrod-straight president seemed hunched over during much of the debate?

    Bloggers are burning up their keyboards with speculation. Check out the president's peculiar behaviour during the debate, they say. On several occasions, the president simply stopped speaking for an uncomfortably long time and stared ahead with an odd expression on his face. Was he listening to someone helping him with his response to a question? Even weirder was the president's strange outburst. In a peeved rejoinder to Kerry, he said, "As the politics change, his positions change. And that's not how a commander in chief acts. I, I, uh - Let me finish - The intelligence I looked at was the same intelligence my opponent looked at." It must be said that Bush pointed toward Lehrer as he declared "Let me finish." The green warning light was lit, signalling he had 30 seconds to, well, finish.

    Hot on the conspiracy trail, I tried to track down the source of the photo. None of the Bush-is-wired bloggers, however, seemed to know where the photo came from. Was it possible the bulge had been Photoshopped onto Bush's back by a lone conspiracy buff? It turns out that all of the video of the debate was recorded and sent out by Fox News, the pool broadcaster for the event. Fox sent feeds from multiple cameras to the other networks, which did their own on-air presentations and editing.

    To watch the debate again, I ventured to the website of the most sober network I could think of: C-SPAN. And sure enough, at minute 23 on the video of the debate, you can clearly see the bulge between the president's shoulder blades.

    Bloggers stoke the conspiracy with the claim that the Bush administration insisted on a condition that no cameras be placed behind the candidates. An official for the Commission on Presidential Debates, which set up the lecterns and microphones on the Miami stage, said the condition was indeed real, the result of negotiations by both campaigns. Yet that didn't stop Fox from setting up cameras behind Bush and Kerry. The official said that "microphones were mounted on lecterns, and the commission put no electronic devices on the president or Senator Kerry." When asked about the bulge on Bush's back, the official said, "I don't know what that was."

    So what was it? Jacob McKenna, a spyware expert and the owner of the Spy Store, a high-tech surveillance shop in Spokane, Washington, looked at the Bush image on his computer monitor. "There's certainly something on his back, and it appears to be electronic," he said. McKenna said that, given its shape, the bulge could be the inductor portion of a two-way push- to-talk system. McKenna noted that such a system makes use of a tiny microchip-based earplug radio that is pushed way down into the ear canal, where it is virtually invisible. He also said a weak signal could be scrambled and be undetected by another broadcaster.

    Mystery- bulge bloggers argue that the president may have begun using such technology earlier in his term. Because Bush is famously prone to malapropisms and reportedly dyslexic, which could make successful use of a teleprompter problematic, they say the president and his handlers may have turned to a technique often used by television reporters on remote stand-ups. A reporter tapes a story and, while on camera, plays it back into an earpiece, repeating lines just after hearing them, managing to sound spontaneous and error free.

    Suggestions that Bush may have using this technique stem from a D- day event in France, when a CNN broadcast appeared to pick up - and broadcast to surprised viewers - the sound of another voice seemingly reading Bush his lines, after which Bush repeated them. Danny Schechter, who operates the news site MediaChannel.org, and who has been doing some investigating into the wired-Bush rumors himself, said the Bush campaign has been worried of late about others picking up their radio frequencies - notably during the Republican Convention on the day of Bush's appearance. "They had a frequency specialist stop me and ask about the frequency of my camera," Schechter said. "The Democrats weren't doing that at their convention."

    Repeated calls to the White House and the Bush national campaign office over a period of three days, inquiring about what the president may have been wearing on his back during the debate, and whether he had used an audio device at other events, went unreturned. So far the Kerry campaign is staying clear of this story. When called for a comment, a press officer at the Democratic National Committee claimed on Tuesday that it was "the first time" they'd ever heard of the issue. A spokeswoman at the press office of Kerry headquarters refused to permit me to talk with anyone in the campaign's research office. Several other requests for comment to the Kerry campaign's press office went unanswered. As for whether we really do have a Milli Vanilli president, the answer at this point has to be, God only knows.


    Source => http://www.independent-media.tv/item.cfm?fmedia_id=9321&fcategory_desc=Under%20Reported
     
  13. coma

    coma New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    0
    Almost looks like a bra strap or some other kind of womanly undergarment.
     
  14. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
  15. boris yeltsin

    boris yeltsin New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2004
    Messages:
    32,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    It does :eek3:
     
  16. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
  17. boris yeltsin

    boris yeltsin New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2004
    Messages:
    32,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
  18. Jo`linar

    Jo`linar Guest

    Its sad and pityful that extreme left wing lesbians/homosexuals resort to fake and incomplete radical left articles such as this to attack our president.
     
  19. coma

    coma New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    0
    Motion to ban CoCo!:sadwavey:
     
  20. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    :hahano:
     
  21. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    Psalm 2004

    Dubya Is My Sheperd
    Psalm 2004

    Bush is my shepherd, I shall be in want.

    He maketh me lie down on park benches,

    He leadeth me beside the still factories.

    He restoreth my doubts about the Republican Party.

    He leadeth me into the paths of unemployment for his cronies' sake.

    Yea, though no weapons of mass destruction have been found, he maketh me continue to fear Evil.

    His tax cuts for the rich and his deficit spending discomfort me.

    He anointeth me with never-ending debt:

    Verily my days of savings and assets are kaput.

    Surely poverty and hard living shall follow me all the days of his administration,

    And my jobless child shall dwell in my basement forever.
     
  22. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    :nuts: haha, again, G'oul Du Kaht (or whatever you're calling yourself this week) is removed.

    -PS- I'm one "Indian" you shouldn't fuck with. ;)
     
  23. Taylor

    Taylor Guest

    :love:
     
  24. Ferron

    Ferron So yes, I'll see you there.

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,375
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland
    Ok, so I am a little panic stricken here. With Rehnquist's diagnosis and the general age of the other Justices, I have heard reports that the next president may have it within his power to appoint two new Supreme Court Justices.

    Clearly, I am voting for Kerry and I have a general dislike of Bush and his politics, but this news is terrifying to me. If Bush is re-elected, I can foresee the country being set back decades. We have already had civil liberties taken from us in response to 9/11, and I shudder to think about Bush picking the people who get to decide on the legality of Gay Marriage and Abortion.

    Please someone tell me I'm just exceptionally paranoid this morning! Please tell me that I'm wrong in my fear!
     
  25. CoCo

    CoCo ...is a Queer Don!! OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland ; the land of Mary's...
    Actually, far from it... Political Watchers have long been predicting that the next President will be appointing one or more supreme justices. That is why in the third (and last :rolleyes: ) Presidential Debate, both candidates were asked about this issue. AND Bush answered that he will appoint people who will not be an 'activist judge', upholding moral laws as well as civil laws. And I was terrified :eek3: !
     

Share This Page