Nutrigenomics

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Genghis.Tron, Sep 22, 2006.

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  1. Genghis.Tron

    Genghis.Tron New Member

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    Here's something I posted elsewhere :

    [​IMG]

    This figure shows how some genotypes of the APOE (apolipoprotein: Apolipoproteins are the protein part of the fat found in blood and may affect our body's reactions to different fat ratio in our diet.) react to different fat ratio in the diet. Let's also note that we carry two versions of the same gene, one from our mom, one from our father.
    The (a) graph shows how everyone in the experiment reacts to different fat ratio. If there's no effect of the fat ratio, the line in the graphic will be horizontal. Graph (b) shows how people with at least one e2 allele react. Graph (c) shows how people with two e3 alleles react and graph (d) is how people with one e4 allele react.
    We can conclude that people that carry at least one e4 allele react greatly to saturated fat intake. These are the people that should avoid it. They have a higher LDL in their blood if they take 25% of the amount of energy from saturated fat. This is not always bad since we can also see that they can have a lower LDL level than the other groups when they avoid it.

    So if I get tested and know that I have a certain version of this gene, I might be able to know if it's important for me to avoid saturated fat (such as those who carry the e4 allele) or if I shouldn't even matter (the line on graph (c) is almost horizontal so the saturated fat intake has almost no effect on those who carry two e3 alleles).
    This is only ONE gene that has a certain influence on cholesterol. We will know the use of many more genes in the future and maybe there will be a study on the reaction to protein and how they make you feel full or maybe on how our body reacts to a certain carb intake. It costs about 250$ to get a genetic test nowadays and it will get cheaper and cheaper (it was 1000$ 1-2 years ago). Once we have the results, we will know what alleles we carry and all we have to do is to read about studies on genes and see what we should do.

    Here's the link to the entire article : http://docstore.ingenta.com/cgi-bin...ingentaconnect.com/error/delivery&format=html
     
  2. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

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    thanks, ceaze
     
  3. Marijuanair

    Marijuanair Remember to have your pet spayed or neutered! OT Supporter

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    I actually tought it was ceaze for a sec too. He stopped posting like this though.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2007
  4. MIK3

    MIK3 New Member

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    i have no idea whats going on in this thread
     
  5. Genghis.Tron

    Genghis.Tron New Member

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    Holy bump from hell because I found something interesting :o

    They basically showed that a low-fat/low-cholesterol diet (probably similar to what's suggested by nutritionists and government agencies) has a positive effect on people with a specific version of a gene (which, from what I gathered, is found in only 1/3 of the population :eek3:) while it might have negative effects on those who don't have this version of the gene (2/3% of the population...).

    So when a diet is suggested, whether it be by a nutritionist or here, there WILL be a lot of individual difference in response to it. Some people can do quite well on a Burger King and Wendys diet while some should be eating like meat-eating vegetarians.

    They also found that some veggies/fruits activate some genes that protect from cancer and so on. There will be tons of interesting research like this from now on.
     
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