NTFS or FAT32 and cluster size question

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by irichie, Jun 3, 2003.

  1. irichie

    irichie New Member

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    I am upgrading my friend's old Toshiba laptop and was planning on installing Win XP instead of ME, which he has now. Its a Celeron 700 with 192MB.

    The HD is 8GB and I was wondering if FAT32 would be faster, since he doesnt need any of the security features or compression that comes with NTFS, all he does is surf the internet and some word processing.

    Also, I have a question about cluster size in general, XP defaults to 4KB but if I dont use compression, would there be any benefits by resizing the clusters to 16 or 32KB?
     
  2. R-Type

    R-Type The Bydo Empire must die!

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    FAT32. NTFS is a lot slower on a simple workstation like a laptop. The 5400rpm disk doesn't help much either. Hell, I notice the difference on my 10krpm SCSI disks.
     
  3. NoLiving

    NoLiving Guest

    FAT32 is worthless and ancient. The advantage from NTFS doesn't come from compression in the filesystem, it comes from the fact that NTFS is journaled and isn't nearly as suceptable to filesystem corruption as FAT32. I would never recomend someone to use FAT32 over NTFS.
     
  4. R-Type

    R-Type The Bydo Empire must die!

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    A laptop 8GB 5200 rpm disk is going to need all the help it can get performance-wise and NTFS can get quite slow when used on such disks. Since that is the case for this disk, why go for a filesystem that has tons of unneeded overhead?

    NTFS can be a chore to extract data from should the OS become non-bootable for some reason. In a pinch, if you use FAT32, you can use a win9x cd to get critical files off the disk without having to boot the installed OS. If you use NTFS, you'll have to depend on 'system restore' and/or repair, which I would never recommend anyone depending on.

    Another retrieval option for NTFS would be a linux boot cd. Then you could mount either filesystem and at least read the data. With PCMCIA and net support, you could transfer critical files off the laptop before formatting/reinstalling windows (again).

    Is FAT32 ancient? Hell yeah, but in this case I think it would be the better choice. As always, never trust any media, no matter what FS is used on it! Journalling file systems can and do lose data too!! Back up your stuff!!
     
  5. CyberBullets

    CyberBullets I reach to the sky, and call out your name. If I c

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    bah!

    easiest way to fix problem. go ext3 :big grin:
     

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